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936 



REYNOLDS HISTORICJB[D 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



J 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02281 8899 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/officialstatisti03miss 



THE 



Official and Statistical R egister 



/ 



STATE OF MISSISSIPPI 



"1Q08 



BY 

OUNBAR ROWLAND, LL.r). 



I 

I DIRECTOR 



Departmeni of Archives and History, Member American Historical 
Association and National Public Archives Commission. 




NASHVILLI-, TKN'N. . 
PRESS OF THE BRANliON PklNTlNG COMPANY 
1908 






1726936 

MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 869 

made no detailed report, and Bowen was severely wounded, and the Hud- 
son Battery is not mentioned in the official reports. 

Served in defense of Vicksburg, July, 1862, under command of First 
Lieut. J. R. Sweaney, attached to Helm's Brigade. Under command of 
Sweaney participated in the battle of Baton Rouge, August 5, 1862, with 
the division under General Clark, General Breckenridge gave them hon- 
orable mention in his report. The battery had six men wounded. At- 
tached to Rust's Brigade of Lo veil's Division, VanDom's Army, at the 
battle of Corinth, October, 1862, Lieutenant Sweaney in command, but 
had no opportunity to participate. With Rust's Brigade, January, 1863, 
Port Hudson district; same, March, Lieut. Sweaney commanding. 
Transferred to Jackson, ]Miss., sent April 18, with Lowry's Regiment, to 
reinforce General Bowen at Grand Gulf. At r a. m., April 30, hearing that 
Grant was crossing the river to Bruinsburg, Bowen sent a section of the 
Hudson Battery, with Col. Robert Lowry's Regiment and a part of 
Green's Brigade to occupy the roads in front of Port Gibson, in all 775 
men, which he reinforced during the battle of May i with other infantry 
and artillery to a total of 5,000. General Green reported that in the 
opening of the battle, three hours before dawn, on the Rodney road near 
Union Church, "the Hudson Battery, though in a very warm place, suc- 
ceeded in driving the enemy's battery from its position. This, however, 
was soon replaced by another, which opened upon us with great fury. 
Our battery replied with signal success, though the enemy's shells and 
balls fell thick around them, wounding many; yet they stood by their 
guns and kept up a regular fire. After three hours hard fighting the enemy 
ceased firing and withdrew a short distance." Sweaney retired his bat- 
tery for ammunition, but soon returned and was engaged until Green was 
compelled to retreat about 11 o'clock. 

"The Hudson Battery brought off all their pieces," General Bowen 
said, "but had lost so many horses they were compelled to abandon their 
caissons. This battery suffered severely, having twenty wounded." 

May 14, Lieut. Sweaney's section, camped near the Cox hospital, 
placed at disposal of General Forney for defense of Big Black bridge. 

On the Vicksburg line tablets 131 and 132 mark the right and left 
guns (i2-pounder howitzers) of Hudson's Battery. These guns took 
position on the morning of the investment and remained until disabled 
First Lieut. E. S. Walton commanded two guns in the railroad redan. 
From this detachment four men were captured during the charge made 
upon the fort. Tablet 150 marks the site of a 6-pounder gun, commanded 
by Lieuts. Sweaney and Trantham. Sweaney was killed and Walton 
desperately wounded, and Lieut. Trantham was left in command. 

In parole camp at Enterprise, November, 1863, Captain James L. 
Hoole commanding; present, 64; aggregate, 102, December, exchanged. 
Chalmers sent Hoole 's Batter}- of mountain howitzers, with his reinforce- 
ments, to General Forrest during the Meridian campaign, and they par- 
ticipated in the battle of Okolona, February*2 2, 1864, both in the town, and 
in the attack five miles out, where Col. JeiT. Forrest and Colonel Barks- 



fh\Uy'S\ I 



870 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

dale were killed. Hudson's Battery, Lieut. E. S. Walton, two lo-pounder 
Parrots and two 12-pounder howitzers, in Morton's Artillery Battalion of 
Forrest's Cavalry, with batteries of Morton, Thrall and Rice. 

In battle of Harrisburg, July 14, 1864, on the right of the line, with 
Roddey's Division. 

In the attack on Athens, Ala., September 23, 1864, "Hudson's Battery, 
commanded by Lieut. E. S. Walton, was placed northeast of the fort," 
(Forrest's report) which surrendered after artillery firing was kept up a 
short time, Walton's guns were also in action at Sulphur Springs, where 
another garrison was taken, September 25, and at Eastport, October 10, 
Walton, supported by Kelley's Cavalry, defeated two gunboats and three 
transports loaded with troops. "Two balls penetrated one gunboat and a 
shell burst in one of the transports, causing it to be enveloped in steam 
and flame." . The batter}' was with Forrest in the raid in West Tennessee, 
which followed, and at Johnson ville, November 3, with Morton's and 
Thrall's Batteries, made the famous fight against the land batteries and 
gunboats defending the military depot. About fifty guns were in action, 
mostly on the Federal side. "The gunboats, in fifteen minutes after the 
engagement commenced, were set on fire, and made rapidly for the shore, 
where they were consumed. My batteries next opened upon the trans- 
ports, and in a short time they were in flames. The immense amount of 
stores were also set on fire, together with the huge warehouse above the 
landing. The enemy continued a furious cannonading on my batteries." 
(Forrest's report.) At times the rammers were shot from the hands of the 
cannoneers and men were nearly buried under the dirt thrown on them by 
f the explosion of shells from the land batteries, and their work was possible 

.[ only by reason of their remarkable accuracy and rapidity of firing. 

General Chalmers reported that a section of the battery aided in the 
capture of the transport Cheeseman, October 30, at Paris Landing. 

March 23, 1865, General Forrest, at West Point, ordered General 
Chalmers at Pickensville, Ala., to send Armstrong's Brigade with Hud- 
son's Battery to Selma. April 11, Hudson Battery with General Starke 
at Greensboro. 



QUITMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY. . 

Captains — William S. Lovell, promoted Major; Richard T. English. 

First Lieutenants — John L. Holt, resigned; Lyman G. Aldrich. 

Junior First Lieutenant — W. W. Wilkins. 

Second Lieutenants — George W. Miller, resigned; Harvey G. Mans- 
field. 

Third Lieutenant — Richard T. English, promoted Captain 20 Sep- 
tember, 1 86 1. 

First Sergeant — Lyman G. Aldrich. 

Organized at Natchez. Officers commissioned of date 11 April, 1S61; 
number of men, 68 (Adjutant-General's report). Secretary Walker 
despatched Go\emor Pettus, April 8, 1861, that the artillery company at 



■f r'.<xs''^T\ 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 871 

Natchez, William S. Lovell, Captain, was needed at once at Pensacola. 
Ordered to Pensacola, where general orders of April 30 announced that 
Captain Lovell's independent company of cavalry had been received into 
the service of the Confederate States. See English's Battery. 



• SMITH'S-TURNER'S BATTERY. 

Organized July i, 1861 ; in active service from August, 1861. 

Captains — Melancthon Smith, promoted; William B. Turner. 

First Lieutenant — A. G. Hough. 

Junior First Lieutenant — John G. Dables. 

Second Lieutenant — Joseph W. Eckford. 

The company was first organized as the Chickasawhay Desperadoes 
of Clarke County, Captain James S. Terrall, April 24, 1861, for infantry 
I service, original roll, 51. Consolidated with company raised by Captain 

Smith, commissioned July 14. Smith was a native of Alabama, graduate 
of West Point, who had resigned from the United States Army, in 1854, 
after nine years' service. 

Captain William B. Turner entered the Confederate service April 24, 
1861, as a private of infantry, promoted First Lieutenant; commissioned 
Captain May 2, 1863, for skill and valor. His battle record was Belmont, 
Shiloh, Perry ville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge. First 
" Lieut. Chandler S. Smith entered the service as Second Lieutenant of 
infantry, April 24, 1861. Second Lieutenant W. W. Henry as Sergeant 
of infantry same date. Second Lieutenant B. T. Harman as Sergeant same 
date, Lieut. C. LeB. Ingraham killed at Chickamauga. 

The battery was with General Clark at Union City, Tenn.; August 5, 
1 86 1, was ordered to report to General Pillow at New Madrid. In Oc- 
tober it w^as attached to Colonel Stephens' Brigade of Cheatham's Division 
in Polk's army at Columbus, Ky. When General Grant landed a force 
to attack the Confederate post at Belmont, on the Missouri shore, No- 
vember 7th, Smith's Battery was ordered to the river bank, where it 
opened upon the Federals across the river. General Polk reported that 
he was particularly indebted for victory to Captain Smith, of the Mississippi 
battery, and to Major A. P. Stewart, who directed the artiller\' in the fort. 

After the retreat to Corinth the battery continued with Cheatham's 
Division, Col. George Maney succeeding to command of the brigade. 

At the battle of Shiloh, April 6-7, the batter}- had 120 men and 6 guns 
engaged, i man killed and 13 wounded, lost 23 horses, 3 guns and 5 
caissons, but took 5 guns on the first day. It happened that General 
Cheatham encountered the left of the line of General Sherman, reinforced 
by Hurlbut's Division, which marched up to Sherman's position through 
the remnants of Prentiss' Division streaming to the rear, and consequently 
Cheatham had the most determined opposition found on the field that 
day. He brought up Smith's guns to oppose Hurlbut's Artillery-, and the 
Mississippians unlimbered and came into battle with the utmost prompt- 



A -■■■ •■■ ■■' 



872 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

ness, under a fire that disabled some of their horses. Their first shot 
stampeded one of Hurlbut's Batteries (Myers' of Ohio) but Ross' Mich- 
igan Battery made a gallant fight and was a worthy antagonist of Smth 
during an artillery duel of an hour, in which the Michigan company lost 
50 killed and wounded. When Breckenrdge came up and went into line 
on the right of Cheatham, a charge was attempted across an open field 
against the Federal line, but the Confederates were driven back with 
heavy loss. Later in the day, when Breckenridge had pushed around 
to the flank of the Federal line, a second assault was successful and Hurl- 
but fell back toward the river. In the course of his retreat Miller's 
Mississippi Cavalry made a dash and captured the Michigan Battery 
before it could unlimber — at least four of the guns and 27 men as stated 
in the Federal reports. "Capt. Melancthon Smith's Light Battery did 
splendid service," General Cheatham wrote, "and Captain Smith and his 
officers were' distinguished examples of gallantry'." Casualties, killed, 2. 
Smith's Battery fought gallantly through the second day also when 
victory was with the Federal troops. Cheatham held from morning until 
after 2 o'clock, when he was ordered to retire from the position he had 
gained, and was supported effectively by Lieutenant Eckford, of Smith's 
Battery, with two guns of the battery. 

Lieut. W. B. Turner, commanding, in battalion of artillery under Maj. 
Melancthon Smith, attached to Cheatham's Division, Polks' Corps. In 
the battle of Chickamauga, September 19-20, 1863, Turner had four im- 
pounder Napoleon guns, served them at short range, fired 220 rounds and 
did great execution, at a loss to the battery of 2 killed and 5 wounded, and 
2 horses killed. They crossed the Chickamauga on the 19th, with Clancy's 
Brigade, marched to the north and went into battle where Forrest's 
Cavalry was attacking the left flank of General Thomas on the Chattanooga 
road. The place was one of great confusion and danger and in obedience 
to orders Turner posted three guns on a hilltop to the rear, which then 
became, because of his occupancy of the position, one of the chief historic 
spots of the field. One gun, under First Lieutenant Smith, remained 
with Maney's Brigade, which was driven back in a shattered condition. 
Maney reported: "My advance gun, under the immediate command and 
I efficient management of Lieutenant Smith, after covering the retiring line 

with several well-directed shots at short range, was withdrawn to tht 
hilltop and took position with the other three, the batterv', by order of 
! the Division General, being retained there with the line formed to check 

the enemy's advance." The battery was the rallying point of the division 
of Cheatham, who reported that Jackson's and Smith's Brigades were now 
[, advanced to the right and left of Turner's Battery. "The enemy, flushed 

with a supposed victory, boldly advanced upon my line, and coming 
within short range was checked and forced back in disorder by the well- 
directed discharges of shell and canister from the guns of Turner's Bat- 
• tery." In his report of that day's battle Cheatham made personal 

I reference to this, "I cannot forbear to refer to the important service ren- 

I dered by Lieut. William B. Turner, connnanding battery. Posted on an 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 873 

elevation commanding the approach of the enemy, he used his advantage 
with great effect and displayed a degree of efficiency in the service of his 
guns highly commendable to himself, his officers and men, and accomp- 
lished a result the importance of which it is difficult to estimate." The 
division rested quiet under the protection of Turner's guns until ordered 
into the fatal night attack. Maney proudly mentioned his "four as good 
guns, and in my judgment, as gallantly and efficiently manned and served 
as any our service can boast." Three times, he said, the Union lines were 
shattered by the artillery fire, and this conduct was but a repetition of 
what Turner and his men had done at Perry ville and Murfreesboro. 
After the siege of Corinth the battery accompanied Bragg's army to 
Chattanooga. In the organization of August 18-20, 1862, attached to 
Maney's Brigade of Cheatham's Division, Polk's right wing. Army of the 
Mississippi, Capt. Melancthon Smith was made Chief of Artillery, and the 
battery was commanded by Lieut. W. B. Turner. The battery accom- 
panied the army in the Kentucky campaign, and at the battle of Perry- 
ville, October 8, 1862, had 4 wounded. The battery was placed on a hill 
on the extreme right, overlooking the Federal line of battle, and Turner 
opened an enfilading fire at a distance of 250 or 300 yards, with canister 
and shell, until the Federals fell back, when the Confederate infantry 
captured the battery which had been replying to Turner. That night 
Turner and his men took their horses to the front and brought off seven 
pieces of artillery that had been captured. Under the command of 
Lieutenant Turner the battery, two 12 -pounder Napoleons and two 12- 
pounder howitzers, took part, in the battle of Murfreesboro. Maneys, 
Brigade advanced to Lavergne, where General Wheeler was stationed, 
December 26, and advised General Bragg that Rosecrans' army was 
advancing, whereupon Bragg fell back to Murfreesboro, and went into 
line of battle. In the battle of the 31st, Cheatham reported: "General 
Maney placed Turner's Battery of Napoleon guns in position near the 
brick-kiln, which in a short time silenced the battery on the east side of 
the road (Wilkinson pike)." This was the only one of Cheatham's 
batteries used that day (Wednesday) and it "did good service," Cheatham 
said. "On Friday and Saturday Captains Stanford, Scott, Cames and 
Turner did excellent service with their guns, which had been advanced up 
the railroad by order of Lieutenant-General Polk," to assist in the attack 
on Round Forest. Turner reported that the battery was engaged four 
times Wednesday and six times Friday. "We drove back a line of in- 
fantry on Wednesday, and on Friday, in conjunction with Cames' and 
Stanford's Batteries, were engaged with several of the enemy's batteries 
and drove back a column of their infantry." That evening, at sundowm, 
Turner opened with his two light 12-pounder guns on an approaching 
column of infantry and repulsed it. During the two days they fired about 
800 rounds. One man was killed, Henry Sellers, and 4 wounded. Smith 
was severely wounded as he was covering the retreat of Maney's Brigade, 
and Turner put in his place Lieut C. LeB. Ingraham, who was killed in the 
fight that followed. "My battery fired during the engagement, which 



874 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

lasted one hour, 220 rounds of solid shot, shell, spherical case and canister. 
The repulse of the enemy was effected by my battery alone, as there was 
only an occasional shot fired by a few sharpshooters who had remained to 
support it." (Turner). On the 2 2d Lieut. W. W. Henry's section was 
the first to take position on Missionary Ridge, opposite Chattanooga, and 
that night the entire battery moved ov^ the ridge to the place assigned 
them in the line of siege. The casualties of the 19th were 2 killed and 4 
wounded. The battery was not in action on the 20th. Private F. H. 
Hendrix, killed, was named in the Roll of Honor. 

In December, 1863, after the battle of Missionary Ridge and retreat 
to Dalton, Turner had been promoted to Captain. Present for duty, 107. 
Early in 1864 Lieutenant Smith was on detail as Regimental Adjutant. 
He had once been passed for promotion to Captain, was again recom- 
mended for promotion. March 29, 1864, four Napoleon guns, 89 men 
present for duty. 

During the Atlanta campaign, 1864, Col. Melancthon Smith com- 
manded the artillery of Hardee's Corps, Hoxton commanded the battalion, 
Captain Turner commanded the battery. 

September, 1864, Captain Turner commanding the battalion. Lieu- 
tenant Henry the company. In the Franklin-Nashville campaign, Col- 
onel Smith, commanding artillery of Cheatham's Corps, battalion com- 
manded by Captain Turner. March, 1865, Colonel Smith commanding 
right wing defenses of Mobile, Captain Turner commanding the company. 



SEVEN STARS ARTILLERY. 

Of Copiah County, officers commissioned by Governor May 14, i86i; 
enlisted at Hazelhurst September i, 1861. 

Captains — Hezekiah G. D. BroTvn, Calvit Roberts. 
First Lieutenant — Calvit Roberts. 
Junior First Lieutenant — John E. Butler. 
Second Lieutenant — Mica j ah D. Wade. 
First Sergeant — William H. Thompson. 
Enrolled, 114. 

Captain Calvit Roberts' . company, aggregate present, 77, at Port 
Hudson, report of August 31, 1862; assigned to Maxey's Brigade, Jan- 
uary, ib63, in the breastworks at Port Hudson; Lieut. F. W. Coleman in 
command April 30. 1863. Roberts' Battery temporarily assigned to 
Colonel Miles' line on the breastworks. May 15. Two guns of Roberts' 
Battery was with Col. John L. Lggan in the fight at Plains' store. May 21. 
at the beginning of the siege of Port Hudson, and continued with his 
command, headquarters at Clinton, La. The other section was in the lines 
during the siege. Colonel Brand, commanding right wing, reported one 
man of the battery wounded June 26. That part of the battery sur- 
rendered July 8 and paroled, was commanded at parole by Lieut. F. G. W. 
Coleman. 



1-. ..r?.-j ' >: 



JilLITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. « 876 

The section with Colonel Logan served with that command in Louisi- 
ana and Mississippi; with Logan's Cavalry in several skirmishes with 
Winslow's Federal Cavalry during McPherson's reconnaissance from 
Vicksburg toward Canton, October 15-19, 1863. Winslow reported a 
severe fight near Brownsville, October 15, in which the Fifth Illinois was 
thrown in much confusion, while Logan gave most importance to the 
fight near Livingston, October 16, where he claimed a substantial check 
to the enemy. In this battle the artillery was effectively engaged. 
Later in 1863, mentioned as attached to Griffith's Brigade of Jackson's 
Cavalry; early in 1864, Roberts' Battery attached to Wirt Adams' 
Brigade of Cavalry. 

QUITMAN LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

Captain — J. Frank Kerr. 

First Lieutenant — R. H. Purdom. ' • 

Second Lieutenant — M. W. Boyd. 

Third Lieutenant — James T. Lester. 

This company, of Jackson, is included in the Adjutant-General's 
report of September, i860, Captain Kerr commanding. Previous to 
January 10, 1861, when the Louisiana State Government took possession 
of the United States forts on the river in that State, Governor Pettus was 
requested by the Governor of Louisiana to protect the latter from rein- 
forcement of the forts from up the river. Governor Pettus sent Captain 
Kerr, with sixteen of the Jackson Artillery, and ordered Capf. H. H. 
Miller to call out the volunteer companies of Vicksburg, and take such 
position as would enable him to prevent any hostile expedition from the 
Northern States descending the river. Kerr arrived at Vicksburg Jan- ; 

uary 10, and fortified at Fort Hill, supported by three Vicksburg infantry ' 

companies. Next day a steamer from Cincinnati was fired upon, but the i, 

boat made its landing as usual and nothing warlike was discovered in the J 

cargo. i 

The company officers above nam.ed were commissioned 9 February, ^ 

1861. April 8, Secretary Walker asked Governor Pettus to order the j 

artillery company at Jackson, of wh;ch R. H. Purdon is Lieutenant, to ,^ 

Pensacola. April 15, Maj.-Gen. Charles Clark reported that he had re- ' 

ceived report of Kerr's company at Hall's Ferry, and ordered them to -i 

march immediately and report to General Bragg. At Pensacola, April i 

20, it was announced that the company had been received in Confederate ] 

service. June 30 the battery was attached to the Tenth Regiment. ; 

. In 1863, attached to the cavalry command of General Chalmers in ; 

Northern Mississippi. May 21, General Chalmers ordered Captain Kerr, 
with one rifled gun, to accompany Colonel Slemons' command to some 
point on the Mississippi River, near Austin, to fire upon and capture passing 
steamboats. On the same duty with Chalmers on the river in June, and 
in engagements along the Coldwater and Tallahatchie. Under General 
Chalmers' command, at Panola, July, 1863; sent to Grenada, July 14. j 



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876 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

STANFORD'S BATTERY. 

Of Yalobusha County, organized May 17, 1861 ; mustered into service 
of Confederate States at Grenada November 6, 1861. 

Captain — Thomas J. Stanford. 

First Lieutenant — Hugh R. McSwine. 

Junior First Lieutenant — -Ansel! A. Hardin. 

Second Lieutenants — Tillman R. Trotter, James S. McCall, 
V Junior Second Lieutenants — James S. McCall, William A. Brown. 

Muster roll of November 6, 1861, for twelve months, 11 officers and 
70 men.' Roll of June 30, 1862, 21 officers and 117 men (includes 5 died). 

Stanford's Battery was ordered to Columbus, Ky,, November 7, and 
remained there with General Polk until the evacuation and retreat to 
Corinth. The battery was then, in March, 1862, fully equipped, with 
two 1 2 -pounder howitzers, three 6-pounders and one 3 -inch rifle. At the 
reorganization of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston's army, the battery was 
attached to A. P. Stewart's Brigade, and at the battle of Shiloh was the 
only Mississippi organization in the division commanded by Gen. Charles 
Clark, who was wounded and succeeded by Stewart. The battery was 
reinforced before going into the battle of April 6, 1862, by a detachment 
of the Vaiden Artillery, taking the place of men that w^ere sick. Because 
of the scarcity of ammunition, General Polk said, Stanford's men had 
never before heard the report of their own guns, but they fought with 
the steadiness and gallantry of well trained troops. As was the case 
with most of the batteries, Captain Stanford was left at first to fimd his 
own position and work where he seemed most needed. He foimid a 
Federal battery in action and opened upon and silenced it at 600 yards 
distance. 

According to General Ruggles, in the course of the fight that com- 
pelled the surrender of General Prentiss' Federal Division, he brought up 
Trabue's and Stanford's Batteries to oppose a Federal column advancing 
and gaining ground, "and when the conflict was at its height these bat- 
teries opened upon his concentrated forces, producing immediate com- 
motion, and soon resulted in the precipitate retreat of the enemy from 
the contest. At this moment the Second Brigade and the Crescent 
Regiment pressed forward and cut off a considerable portion of the 
enemy, who surrendered." On the second day, April 7, Stanford and 
his gunners were sent to the support of a column commanded by General 
Breckenridge and engaged a Federal battery at a range of 500 3-ards, 
keeping up the battle gallantly, though Breckenridge 's charge failed, 
until almost surrounded, when Stanford brought off as much of his battery 
as he could. Meanwhile, his persistent stand had enabled the infantry 
to rally before falling into a complete rout. He gave honorable mention 
to Lieutenants McSwine, Hardin, Trotter and McCall, and to Lieutenant 
Dimlap, temporarily attached. The battery had 131 men in the battle. 
of whom 6 were killed or mortally wounded, 15 wounded and 2 captured. 
They lost also fifty horses and four of their six guns, but this was through 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 877 

no fault of their own. The guns were afterward recaptured but could 
not be brought away. 

During the siege of Corinth, with Stewart's Brigade, Clark's Division. 
Died at Corinth, 20 or 25. After the retreat to Tupelo, the company 
set out July 23 on the march to Chattanooga. 

After the transfer to Chattanooga, organization of August 18, 1862, 
Capt. T. J. Stanford commanding, attached to Stewart's Brigade, Cheat- 
ham's Division, Polk's right wing. Army of the Mississippi. Accom- 
panied the army to Kentucky and were engaged in the battle of Perry- 
ville, October 8, 1862, where the casualties were 2 killed, i wounded, by 
a single shot in an artillery duel with a battery a mile distant. When ] 

the infantry charged the battery advanced and aided materially in the 
victory won in that part of the field. After this battle they marched | 

back through Cumberland Gap to Knoxville, and across the mountains 
to Tullahoma. Since leaving Tupelo they had marched 1,200 miles. 

At Murfreesboro, Tenn., on Tuesday afternoon, December 30, 1862, 
General Stewart was asked for artillery to support Manigault's Brigade. 
"Knowing that Stanford, his officers and men, were always ready to go 
wherever needed, two pieces were promptly dispatched in charge of 
Lieut. A. A. Hardin. On their return I was informed that they were 
not properly supported; that they were required to engage, at a distance 
not exceeding 600 yards, guns that were throwing shell, canister and 
spherical case; that they accomplished no useful purpose but sustained - 
some loss, one or two men being wounded, and Lieut. A. A. Hardin, a ] 

most estimable and gallant young officer, being killed." Stanford i 

reported that Hardin had performed the object of his mission and was 1 

returning to the battery when he was killed by a cannon shot. In the ' 

great battle of the 31st Stanford was employed under the immediate j 

orders of General Polk. He fought effectively from the old field on the j 

right of the Wilkinson pike, replying to the fire of the Federal artillery, i 

protected the Confederate columns when repulsed, and checked the J 

Federal advances. Advancing as far as the Cowan house on the Nash- 
ville pike, later he gave material aid to the Confederate advance, though . 
exposed to a galling fire, which killed two of his gunners. January i, * 
the batteries of Stanford, Cames and Smith were posted near the rail- - 1 
road, where they were in action on the 2d. To assist the attack by ] 
General Breckenridge, at four in the evening, Stanford was instructed 
to open on the left of the woods to draw their fire from our right. "This 
I evidently succeeded in doing," Stanford reported. "They turned all 
their batteries on me, producing a concentration of shot and shell such 
as I never before witnessed." This artillery force that Rosecrans massed 1 
to repel the attack by Breckenridge was the greatest known to that time 
during the war in the west, and was only equalled by the artillery battle 
in the same month at Fredericksburg, Va. Stanford cared for his men 
so well that in the battle only 3 were killed and 4 wounded, and 7 horses 
killed. He complimented the conduct of Lieutenants McSwine and 
McCall. "The whole company acted bravely, doing no discredit to 



878 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

their reputation gained at Shiloh and Perryville." Private Richard H. 
ElHott was chosen to represent this command on the Roll of Honor for 
this battle. 

May 5, 1863, Brig. -Gen. A. P. Stewart recommended the promotion 
of Captain Stanford to a majority. "Were I permanently in command 
of a division he would be my choice as a Chief of Artillery." 

Capt. Melancthon Smith was promoted to command of the artillery 
battalion of Cheatham's Division, to which Stanford's Battery was 
assigned during the Chickamauga campaign of September, 1863. The 
battery was attached to Strahl's Tennessee Brigade, which suffered 
heavily in the battle of the 19th against Thomas' wing of the Union 
army. The forest did not permit much use of Stanford's four 3-inch 
rifles, and they were not engaged until Strahl had been driven back. 
Strahl wrote: "My battery was at all times immediately in my rear and 
ready at a moment's notice to go into position had an opportunity 
offered where it could have been used with effect." 

After the siege of Chattanooga and battle of Missionary Ridge, 
November 25, 1863, the company was transferred to Stewart's Division, 
Captain Stanford commanding the battery, 116 present, four 12-pounder 
Napoleon guns. The winter was spent in camp near Dalton, Ga. In 
March, 1864, the company had 125 men present and absent.. In the 
battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Missionary 
Ridge, 39 men haS been killed and 11 horses. Major Eldridge, com- 
manding the battalion, wrote at this date: "Captain Stanford is one of 
the eldest Captains of Artillery in this army; has seen much service and 
been in all the important battles fought. He is, therefore, respectfully 
recommended for promotion." 

During Atlanta campaign, in Eldridge 's Battalion, Stewart's Division, 
Hoods' Corps. In his report of the battle of Resaca, May 15, Gen. 
A. P. Stewart wrote: "During the advance Stanford's Battery w^as of 
material assistance, and I deeply regret the loss of that skilful and 
brave officer, Capt. T. J. Stanford, with whom it has been my good 
fortune to be associated with little interruption since March, 1862." 
Stanford's Battery was posted a.long the line of Gen. H. D. Clayton, 
who also mentioned the Captain's death. The gunners of the gun at 
which he fell having been ordered to bear his body to the rear. Private 
John S. McMath continued to serve the gun alone until the brigade had 
returned from a charge. In the battle of New Hope Church, May 25. 
Eldridge's Battalion of three batteries, Stanford's, Oliver's and Fenners', 
"was admirably posted, well served and did great execution. They had 
43 men and 44 horses killed and wounded." They repulsed, during 
nearly three hours, an attack by Federal infantry. "Xo more persistent 
attack or determined resistance has anywhere been made," said Stewart. 
Stanford's Battery had 2 killed and 13 wounded. Lieutenant McCall 
was commanding the battery in June, July and August. 

In the final campaign of the army under General Hood the battery 
was commanded bv Lieutenant McCall, Fenner of Louisiana commanding 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 879 

the battalion, attached to S. D. Lee's Corj)S. Colonel Hoxton, Chief of 
Artillery, reported that eight guns of the battalion (which included 
McCall's four) were posted on the hill near Nashville to the right of the 
Franklin pike on General Clayton's line, on the morning of December r6. 
When the Federal charge was made Fenner's guns "did most splendid 
execution upon them with canister." During the whole day the bat- 
teries were subjected to a terrible artillery fire, which killed many horses, 
and exploded two limber chests. When the infantry gave way, the artil- 
lerymen did their best to save their guns, and succeeded in limbering 
up nearly all of them, but the horses were shot down before they could 
get away. The Stanford Battery was unable to attempt to save any- 
thing. General Holtzclaw reported that the batter>" "was so badly 
crippled as to be immovable, scarce a whole wheel remaining in its 
carriages, sustaining, without works, a fire from eighteen of the enemy's 
guns for seven hours." McCall lost his four guns. The loss of men in 
the artillery of the army was small, said Hoxton, "except in Stanford's 
Battery, which lost 12 men killed and wounded." 

Capt. A. P. Baldwin, Sixth Ohio Battery, reported: "December 16, 
battery was placed in position to the left of the Franklin pike, fronting 
Overton Hill, which was held by the enemy's infantry' and Stanford's 
Mississippi Battery. Battery opened fire and expended 696 rounds of 
ammunition. During the firing two of enemy's limbers exploded with 
shells. This line of works was carried with the capture of Stanford's 
battery about 4 p. m." 

A history of this battery was published by B. W, L. Butt, in a news- 
paper in 1866; not available. 



W^ATSOX BATTERY. 

This artillery company, organized at New Orleans about July i, 1S61, 
of men from various States, largely Irish, and equipped through the 
generosity of Lewis and James- Watson, and others of Rodney, included 
twelve men from Jefferson and Claiborne Counties. D. Beltzhoover was 
the first Captain, and Albert Cage, of Wilkinson County, a Lieutenant. 
The second Captain was E. A. Toledano. The battery was distinguished 
in the actions of Belmont, Mo. ; Shiloh, Baton Rouge, Corinth, Tuscumbia 
Bridge, Farmington, Vicksburg, 1862; Sandy Creek, La., and finally in 
defense of Port Hudson, where many were killed, including two from 
Jefferson County. 



FOURTH LOUISLVXA BATTERY. 

Captain — Archibald J. Cameron. i 

Lieutenants — T. Jefferson Key, R. H. Truly, George M. Brown. 

Captain Cameron, Second Lieutenant of the Jeu'erson Flying Artillery, 
returned home after the battle of Shiloh, and was commissioned bv the 



880 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 1 

War Department to raise a battery to operate on the west coast of the 

river. He enlisted 140 in Jefferson County and Tensas Parish. They 

took part in the engagements at Choctaw Bayou, Yellow Bayou, I 

on the Red River with the Banks expedition, at Ashton with the Marine 1 

Brigade, at fortifications below G. Lake, Ark, The strength of the \ 

company was 138 in April, 1865. Captain Cameron writes: "I can say 

I surrendered the last organized battery in the Confederate army." 



[ , VICKSBURG LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

( Captains — Francis S. Tull, Isaac N. Edwards. 

j First Lieutenant — William R. Spears. 

k Second Lieutenant — John W. Bell, 

■k' Third Lieutenant — John D. Rine. 

I Enrolled, 64; Adjutant-General's report, 90; Warren County roll. 

The officers above named were commissioned of date February 9, 
[^ 1861. April 8, the Secretary of War asked that the company be sent 
[] to Pensacola. April 20, the company having been reorganized at Pensa- 
i cola, was received in the Confederate service. It was attached to the 
■ Ninth Regiment, June 30, at Camp Magnolia. 



[ WARREN LIGHT ARTILLERY. 

I Of Warren County, organized May i, 1861; in service August 9, 1861. 

f Captain — Charles Swett. 

f First Lieutenants — Tames M. Oslin, H. Shannon. 

I Jimior First Lieutenant — H. Shannon. 

I Second Lieutenants — Thomas Havem, Joseph Ashton, H. N. Steele, 

I F. M. Williams. 

\ Total, of Warren County, 116; county enrollment, 1863. 

f October 23, 1861, Major-General Hardee reported that his command 

I at Cave City, Ky., was four regiments infantry, three battalions cavalry, 
• and one section of artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Oslin. One of 
Hardee's regiments was commanded by Col. T. C. Hindman, in 1847 ^ 
Lieutenant in the Second Mississippi Rifles. He was General in com- 
mand of the Arkansas Brigade at Bell's Station in December, and reported 
Swett's Battery in action near Woodsonville, December 1 7. The company 
continued in his command after the retreat to Tennessee and fought at 
Shiloh April 6-7 in the division which was under his command after 
General Hardee was wounded, and after Hindman was disabled they 
: were imder Gen. A. P. Stewart. The official reports indicate that the 
service of the battery was of the most important character, and dangerous. 
At one moment they were saved from a destructive fire by a charge made 
by Hindman's Brigade, which resulted in the capture of the camp of 



(5w ' 5- 

•a' hyi-i 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 881 

Peabody's Federal Brigade. Swett's Battery was among those massed 
to defeat the reinforcement of General Prentiss, causing the surrender of 
that General and a large part of his division. 

The battery was on duty during the siege of Corinth, May, 1862, and 
the battle of Farmington. Attached to Hardee's wing of the army in the 
Kentucky campaign, and participated in the battle of Perryville, October 
8, 1862. 

Under the command of Lieut. H. Shannon, with Liddell's Arkansas 
Brigade of Cleburne's Division, Hardee's Corps, participated in the battle 
of Murfreesboro, beginning at dawn, December 31, 1862. In Cleburne's 
resistless charge, two rifled cannon and ammunition were captured,- 
which Shannon added to his battery and used at subsequent periods of 
the battle. General Liddell reported: "The battery under command of 
Lieutenant Shannon was of infinite service to me throughout the action, 
the men behaving with the greatest bravery, having the battery always 
ready, and, oftentimes, at the right place at the right time without 
receiving or awaiting orders, for which I am indebted to the good judg- 
ment and coolness of Lieutenant Shannon." Colonel Kelly, Eighth 
Arkansas, reported that he was saved from a flank attack by "the timely 
arrival of Swett's Battery." The guns taken, after the battery had been 
silenced by Shannon, were a brass 6-pounder rifle and a lo-pounder 
Parrott gun, and as one of Shannon's howitzers was disabled, the rifle 
gun was at once substituted. In this fight Corporal Martin Green was 
killed, Sergeant John McMullen and Charles McDermitt, Peter j 

Hogan, Frank Bonengal and E. H. Duggar, wounded. In the battle j 

that followed, the battery was in action near the Federal hospitals, com- _j 

manded the Nashville pike, driving the Federal trains from the road, 1 

and on January i was in action against the Federal cavalr}'' on Overall's 
Creek. They fought over about four miles of ground, took fourteen i 

different positions, and fired 153 rounds to the piece, making a total of 
612 rounds. Sergt. William P. McDonald commanded one section and ' =] 

rendered valuable service. Lieut. Thomas Havem had his horse killed 
under him by a cannon shot. Seven men in all were wounded and 11 4 

horses killed and disabled. 1 

At Liberty Gap, June 24-26, the battery fired 136 rounds, the section { 

under Lieut. W. P. McDonald, including the Naxjoleon gun, first meeting | 

the Federal attack, supported soon by Shannon and Swett with the other 1 

sections. After this engagement the retreat of Bragg's army to Chat- ^ 

tanooga was begun. ~ j 

In defense of Rocky Face Mt., Ga., February 25, 1864, and at some \ 

loss compelled withdrawal of a rifle battery, about one mile distance. * 

In the Chickamauga campaign the battery, Lieutenant Shannon 3 

commanding, two 12 -pounder Napoleons and two 6-pounder rifles, < 

served under Captain Charles Swett, acting Chief of Artillery for Liddell's i 

Division, which included Walthall's Brigade. They were in action I 

October i8th with Federal batteries at Alexander's Bridge on Chicka- I 

mauga Creek, and that evening crossed the creek with Walthall's Brigade ] 



'■b..:J 



882 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

at By ram's Ford. In the dense woods Shannon could not do much hut 
take a position from which he checked pursuit of the brigade when it 
was outflanked and driven back. Later, taking another position while 
Cleburne advanced, Shannon shelled the Federal rear for half an hour, 
and brought off the field some captured artillery and ammunition. Sc])- 
tember 20 they fought on the northern extremity of Bragg's line, support- 
ing Breckenridge, taking position in an orchard near McDonald's house. 
When Shannon opened upon the one battery visible he was answered by 
that and four others that had been masked, and he retired "as expeditiously 
as possible." In this movement the Federal skirmishers caused the 
upsetting of one of the guns and captured Lieut. W. P. McDonald, who 
was mortally wounded, and several other wounded men, also Corporal 
Joseph Ashton, who, however, made his escape when part of the Arkansas 
Brigade came to their help and rescued the gun and the wounded. Colonel 
Govan, commanding this brigade, reported that Shannon handled his 
battery with distinguished skill and gallantry and most effectively. The 
casualties were 2 killed and 2 wounded. Lieutenant Shannon and 
Corporal Warren Huffman were mentioned in the Roll of Honor. 

After Chickamauga the battery was included with Key's Helena 
Battery and Semple's Alabama Battery in Hotchkiss' Battalion, the 
artillery of Cleburne's Division. Major T. R. Hotchkiss, commanding 
the battalion, entered the service in July, 1861, from Mississippi, as a 
private of artiller>'. 

In his telegrams to Stanton, L^nited States Secretary of War, during 
the battle of Missionary Ridge, November 25, 1863, Charles A. Dana 
said of the fight on the extreme north of the line: "Sherman tmdertook to 
take by storm a battery which the rebels obstinately maintained upon 
the hill above the tunnel. I saw the column sent up for this purpose 
twice repulsed, falling back the first time in disorder." General Cleburne, 
who defeated Sherman on this field, said in his report: "On the top of 
Tunnel Hill a space was left clear of infantry, and Swett's battery of 
four Napoleon guns, commanded by Lieut. H. Shannon, was posted on it 
so as to sweex^ north," in the direction of the ridge that Sherman occupied. 
-When the serious fight of the day began about 11 o'clock a heavy charge 
was made on Swett's Battery at the apex of the hill. "The artillerymen 
stood bravely by their guns under a terrible crossfire, and replied with 
canister at short range, but still the enemy advanced." When within 
fifty jjaces of the guns a charge by Smith's Texans drove back the Federal 
line, though Smith and Mills fell wounded. A second assault was made, 
which Lowrey's Mississippians aided the battery in repelling. "In these 
attacks Lieutenant Shannon, commanding Swett's Battery, was wounded. 
The command devolved -on Lieut. Joseph Ashton; in a few minutes he 
was mortally wounded. The command then fell on Corporal F. M. 
Williams. So many non-commissioned officers and men had been killed 
and disabled in the battery that Colonel Granljury was forced to make a 
detail from the infantry to work the guns." (Cleburne). A lull coming 
in the battle, two of the guns were sent to take the place of others found 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. « 883 

inethcient, and Lieutenant Key with his battery came up and took com- 
mand on Tunnel Hill, after which another attack was repulsed. Swett's 
Battery was bravely fought, said Cleburne in conclusion, "was hotly 
engaged all day and lost some noble officers and men." 

December, 1863, near Dalton, Ga., four Napoleon guns, 107 men, 
Captain Swett commanding. When Sherman advanced from Chatta- 
nooga, the battery served in defense of Rocky Face Ridge, February 25, 
1864, and at some loss compelled the withdrawal of a battery about one 
mile distant. 

Up to 1864 the losses in killed had been 5 at Shiloh, 2 at Farmington, 
3 at Perryville, i at Murfreesboro, i Lieutenant and 4 men at Chicka- 
mauga, i Lieutenant and 6 men at Tunnel Hill. Horses killed in the 
same battles, S3- 

In the Atlanta campaign, 1864, at the battle of Resaca, May 14-15, 
Swett's Battery was one of those planted on the commanding hill, with 
Walthall's and Tucker's Brigades in support, forming a memorable 
feature of the conflict. General Walthall, in his report, gave "special 
commendation to Lieut. H. Shannon, the efficient officer commanding 
Swett's Battery, for his repeated acts of signal gallantr>'." 

A newspaper account up to July 4 says: "The company threw up 
fourteen different breastworks from Dalton to the Chattahoochee and 
fought twenty days, firing 1,708 rounds of canister. At Resaca they 
wounded Brigadier-General Willich and killed or wounded three of his 
staff with one charge of canister. At Rocky Ridge a prominent gun was 
disabled by this battery, at New Hope good work was done and at Kene- 
saw Mountain four guns were disabled and an ammunition chest blown 
up.V Casualties: Bailed, at Resaca 2, at Rocky Ridge i, at Kenesaw i; 
wounded, at Resaca 12, at Calhoun i, at New Hope 2, at Gilgal Church 4, 
at Kenesaw 8. Lieutenant Shannon is counted twice, with slight wounds, 
and Lieut. H. N. Steele was also slightly wounded. The killed were 
Sergeants William Fowler and W. Huffman, Privates C. C. Smith, F, B. 
Culbertson; P. Hogan mortally wounded. 

Under Lieutenant-General Hood, Captain Swett was Inspector- 
General of Artillery, Army of Tennessee. 

July 21, near Atlanta, Lieutenant Shannon was severely wounded, 
Lieutenant Williams slightly. Corporal Eckles and M. Kirmin and J. C, 
Mitchell killed, and 5 wotmded. August 18, W. F. Johnson killed | 

August 20 and 25, 5 wounded. At the battle of Jonesboro, September | 

I, the men stood by their guns until the Sixteenth Illinois made a bayonet I 

charge through the battery, capturing the colors and 16 of the men, \ 

including Lieut. F. M. Williams, who was severely wounded. Five of ■] 

the company were killed, 14 wounded. Two of the guns were turned i 

against the Confederate line; but they were not the only ones lost that " j 

day. This was the end of the campaign that began at Dalton. The i 

company casualties had been 10 killed, 40 wounded. ' 

The remnant of the company was left at Macon, Ga., when General 
Hood moved on his last campaign, and it served in the campaign of the 



884 MILITARY HISTaRY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Carolinas with the army of General Johnston, Lieut. H. Shannon com- 
manding. Captain Swett continued on the staff of General Hood as 
Inspector-General of Artillery, through the Tennessee campaign. 

The gallantry of Mississippi soldiers enlisted in the Army of Tennessee 
was not surpassed by those of any other army in the service of the Con- 
federate States. At Shiloh, Franklin, Chickamauga, Atlanta and Vicks- 
burg they displayed the same heroic qualities that marked the service of 
their brothers in the Army of Northern Virginia. The men under Johns- 
ton, Bragg and Hood sustained the cause of the Confederacy with the 
same steadfast devotion that characterized the soldiers of Lee, Jackson 
and Longstreet. The Army of Tennessee developed such Mississ-ppi 
commanders as E. C. Walthall, Earl VanDom, James R. Chalmers and 
M. P. Lowrey, who were gallant leaders on every hard-fought field from 
Shiloh to Bentonville. 



.,»^x»,-ij*fe»««csis*'-"*^ 



al 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. • 885 



TROOPS 1862-65. 



MINUTE MEN AND GHOLSOX'S CAVALRY BRIGADE 



Also Various Commands of Partisan Rangers. 

The Minute Men were organized under the order of Ma j. -Gen. H. C. 

Tupper, commanding State troops, dated May, 1862, in accordance with 

which the Colonels of Militia in each county made up the companies 

required of them severally from the militia companies. The term of 

enlistment was six months. The troops were not mustered into the 

Confederate States service, but were subject to the orders of Confederate 

officers. According to the report, of Adjutant-General Jones S. Hamilton, 

bearing date November i, 1863, but apparently of earher date in fact, 

"there were at first seventy companies of infantry and thirteen companies 

of cavalry, from which there were organized five regiments and four -^ 

battalions of infantry and one battalion of cavalry. The remaining 

cavalry companies were unattached and operated in the northern and 

northwestern part of the State. The cavalry battalion is now filled to } 

a regiment and the unattached companies have entered other cavalry _ j 

organizations since formed. Most of the infantry served out their term j 

of enlistment in that arm of the service, but cavalry being greatly needed i 

in April last, many were permitted to change their service, upon condition j 

that they were to re- volunteer for twelve m.onths. By this means nearly i 

two regiments were formed of men whose term of enlistment had nearly 1 

expired." i 

The organization of Minute Men then were: 

First Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Lawhorn, disbanded. 

Second Regiment, Colonel Quin, now being reorganized. 

Third Regiment, Col. W. J. Owens, disbanded. 

Fourth Regiment, Col. W. C. Bromley, disbanded. 

Fifth Regiment, Col. H. C. Robinson, Vicksburg. 

First Battalion, Major Harper,'Misbanded. • j 

Second Battalion, Major Cook,' disbanded. i 

Third Battalion, Lieutenant-Colonel Burgin, Vicksburg. j 

Fourth Battalion, Major Fairley, being reorganized. j 

First Battalion Cavalry, Major G. L. Blythe. i 

As a result of the reorganization mentioned by the Adjutant-General I 

the following commands were formed: J 

First Regiment Cavalry, Colonel Blythe.' \ 

Second Regiment Cavalry, Colonel Smith. - I 

Third Regiment Cavalry, Colonel McGuirk. I 

Ham's Battalion Cavalry. J 

Davenport's Battalion Cavalry. -* 

Perrin's Battalion Cavalry. | 

I 



S86 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

There were also unattached companies in North Mississippi, in the 
fall of 1863, being organized into a regiment by General George. 

Charles E. Smedes was Brigadier-General commanding Third Brigade, 
Camp Tupper, at Bolton, August, 1862. 

Reuben Davis commanded one brigade. 

In September, 1863, Gen. S. D. Lee listed the following as State 
troops of mounted men organized under the call of General Johnston for 
defense of the State during the Vicksburg campaign, armed and pro- 
visioned and paid by the Confederate States but not enhsted in the 
Confederate States Provisional Army, 

First Regiment, reorganized under Brigadier-General George. 

Second Regiment — Lieutenant-Colonel Lowry. 

Third Regiment, Colonel McGuirk. 

Ham's Battalion. 

Davenport's Battalion. 

Companies of Captains Weatherell, Perry, Herden, Hartin, Red, Hall, 
Saunders, Brookten. 

These included same companies that had been organized under the 
act of Congress authorizing Partisan Rangers, and had been in service 
from 1862. They were accustomed to meeting raiding parties, defending 
the country and attending to their crops in times of quiet. They were 
disposed to give little heed to demands for organization. 

Brigadier-General George, of the State troops, began the work of 
reorganizing the independent commands in the north part of the State 
after Colonel Miller was killed (see First Regiment). The w^ork was 
carried on by Maj.-Gen. Samuel J. Gholson, State troops, commissioned 
April 18, 1863, a work in which he was aided by his staff; Major L. 
Haughton, Adjutant-General; Maj. Thomas W, Harris, Inspector- 
General; Maj. R. M. Bradford, Quartermaster; Capts. James G. Payne 
and C. Ferguson, Aides. 

At Tupelo, December 15, 1863, General Gholson had Lowry 's Regi- 
ment (McGuirk's), Ham's Battalion, and the companies of Weatherall, 
Kilpatrick and Grace, aggregate 1,151. 

Many companies were reorganized and re-enlisted early in 1864, when 
the brigade, known as Gholson's Independent Brigade, was composed of 
McGuirk's and Lowry's Regiments and Ham's and Harris' Battalions, 
aggregate 1,968; Ashcraft's Battalion was added, before the transfer 
to the Confederate States service May i, 1864, after which the brigade 
included the regiments of McGuirk, Lowry, Ham and x\shcraft. General 
Gholson was commissioned as Brigadier-General in the Confederate 
States service May 6, 1864, and was severely wounded in each of his 
battles. February, 18^5. the brigade was consolidated as Ashcraft's 
Regiment. Enrollment May 10, 1864, 2,707; effective 1,213. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 887 



FIRST REGIMENT— MINUTE MEN. 

Colonel — Benjamin Kini^. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — L. La whom. 

Major— B. F. Sutton. 

Adjutant — Thaddeus C. Watson. 

Quartermasters — John Dunning, Joel H. Norton. 

Chaplain — Cor>'don Chamberlain. 

Surgeons — William C. Hicks, Charles B. Galloway, W. D. Dunlap. 

Company A, Copiah County Minute Men, organized 24 May, 1.862. 
Captain — George W. Ellis. 
Lieutenants — John Dunning, Henry Hall, V. A. Hilbum. j 

Enrolled, 53. , J 

Company B, Copiah Guards, organized 26 May, 1862. ^ J 

Captain — Wiley J. Butler. • " j 

Lieutenants — William H. Crawford, Isaiah P. Rembert, Elbert L. 

Fairchilds. ' . I 

Enrolled, 60. , . ' -=■] 

Company C, Raymond Company, organized 29 May, 1862. -. ' -^ 

Captain — N. H. Bradley. - >:4 

Lieutenants— W. L. Hemphill, H. T. T. Dupree, G. W. Gibbs. '] 

Enrolled, 77. . ■ -~'l 

Company D, of Hinds County. - "^• 

Captains— A. L. Brown, T. M. Griffin. ^ 1 

Second Lieutenants — C. W. Montgomery, T. M. Griffin. 



Company E, Jackson Company, organized May 29, 1862. 
Captains — James N. Daniel, John McAulis. 

Lieutenants — John McAulis, R. L. Bumey, Joseph H. Young. 
Enrolled, 67. 

Company F, of Madison County, organized June 2, 1862. 
Captains — James W. Evans, W. C. Hamilton. 

Lieutenants — John T. Crayton, John W. Suber, Daniel H. Gilmorc 
Enrolled, 57. 

Company G, of Rankin County. 

Captains — A. H. Lamar, E. A. Ward. 

Lieutenants — G. W. Rains, E. A. Ward, C. W^. Bryant. 

Enrolled, 46. 

Company H. 

Captain — J. A. Henning. 

Company I, First Regiment State troops, of Rankin City. 
Captains — B. F. Sutton. E. A. Enochs. 
Lieutenants — E. A. Enochs, S. M. Laird, Aaron Price. 
Enrolled, 54. 



888 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company K, of Madison City. 

Captains — Z. Lawhorn, elected Lieutenant-Colonel; James L. Meek. 
Lieutenants — T. J. Alsworth, Jerry Wilson, Robert Williams. 
Enrolled, 48. 

Company L, Davis Guards, Attala County, organized 14 July, 1862. 

Captain — David Love. 

Lieutenants — W. F. Woods, A. B. Reeves, J. H. Weeks. 

This regiment was organized at Grenada July 31, 1862; encamped at 
Camp Bruce, Warren County, in August, 1862; and at Camp Milldale in 
September. 



SECOND REGIMENT— MINUTE MEN. 

Colonel— D. H. Quin. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — James Conerly. 
Major — J. O. Magee. - 

Surgeon — J. K. Parker. 
Quartermaster — R. G. Keller. 

Company A, Lawrence County, enlisted at Monticello 28 July, 1862. 
' Captain— G. W. Willson. 

Lieutenants — C. S. Bronson, W. C. Maxwell, John S. Neal. 
Enrolled, 93. 

Company B, Lawrence County, enlisted at Monticello 2 July, 1862. 
Captain — A. O. Cox. 

Lieutenants — J. H. Lofton, Neil Mathison, Henry Dukes. 
Enrolled, 91. 

Company C, Amite County Minute Men, enlisted 12 July, 1862. 
Captain— T. W. Gray. 

Lieutenants — William R. Jones, James A. Faust, J. F. Martyn. 
Enrolled, 66. 

Company D, Covington Farmers, enlisted at Williamsburg 18 July, 
1862. 

Captain — Nathan Barnes. 

Lieutenants — John Ford, W. L. Speed, M. E. R. Carter. 

Enrolled, 71. 

Company E, enlisted in Franklin County 14 July, 1862. 

Captain — G. A. McGee. 

First Lieutenant — Thomas J. McMillan. 

Enrolled, 45. 

Company F, enlisted at Meadville 21 July, 1862. 
Captain— T. P. Kell. 

Lieutenants — F. H. Dorsey, D. H. Adams, Cade Havard. 
Enrolled, 50. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 889 

Company G, Marion Grays, of Marion County, organized 21 July, 1862. 
Captain — Walter A. Lenoir. 
- Lieutenants — Jacob Pope, Allen McDaniel, M. H. Carlis e. 
Enrolled, 64. 

Company H, Pike County, organized 5 June, 1862. 
Captain — James Conerly. 

Lieutenants — John G. Leggett, E. Prescott, L. A. Blackwell. 
Enrolled, 64. 

Company I, enlisted at Holmesville 5 June, 1862, 
Captains — J. C. Magee, elected Major 11 August, 1862; N. E. Price. 
Lieutenants — Jarrot Caston, N. E. Price, John A. Greer. 
Enrolled, 71. 

The regiment was organized 11 August 1862, at Camp Tupper, Hinds 
County. 

The regiment is reported in the returns of January, 1863, as 106 
present effective, with Hebert's Brigade; same in February and March. 

The Second Regiment and Second and Fourth Battalions, State 
troops, Maj. H. F. Cook commanding, were reported as 96 present, 648 
absent, Station Milldale; x\pril 15, 1863, Maj, J. D. Fairley commanding. 



T9IRD REGIMENT— MINUTE MEN-. 

Colonel — William J. Owens. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — J. A. Hartin. 
Major — F. C. ^Mercer. 

Company A, enlisted at Coffeeville July 14, 1862. 
Captain — G. L. Berry. 

Lieutenants — J. F. Fly, W. D. Robertson, James M. York. 
Enrolled, 70. 

Company B, Carroll County Defenders, enlisted at CarroUton 28 - 

June, 1862. .j 

Captain — G. P. Lake. :\ 

Lieutenants — Daniel Adair, J. J. Wood, J. W. Wood. j 

Enrolled, 74. 1 

Company C, enlisted at CarroUton June,- 1862. 1 

Captains— J. W. Walker, H. S. Hill, J. P. Hamilton, N. J. Dorsey, '. 

Z. P. Clark. 1 

Lieutenants— W. M. Gauley, W. M. Harbin, Z. P. Clark. ] 

Enrolled, 69. • i 

Company D, enlisted at Coffeeville 12 July, 1S62. 
. Captains — S. S. Munday, resigned; H. H. Barksdale. elected Januarv, 
1863. 

Lieutenants— W. H. Powell, G. L. Martin, S. H. Gamer. 

Enrolled, 66. 



890 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company E, enlisted at Grenada July 7, 1862. 

Captain— T. A. Mitchell. 

Lieutenants — E. J. Harden, J. A. Thedford, P. P. Williamson. 

Enrolled, 61. . 

Company F, enlisted at Lexington 14 June, 1862. 
Captain— B. W. Tradewell. 

Lieutenants— John P. Povall, E. B. Steinbock, Wm. F. Cole, J. Q. 
Holmes, B. F. Cuthbert. 
Enrolled, 62. 

Company G, Holmes County, enlisted at Lexington July 12, 1862. 
Captain — Thomas J. Kyle, 

Lieutenants — John Ambrose, Thomas L. Stevens, W. A. Wilson, 
Samuel C. Johnson. 

Enrolled, 82. . — ' ' 

Company H, enlisted at Greensboro 21 July, 1862. 
Captain— Thomas X. Davis. 

Lieutenants — A. P. Harris, J. M. Jones, T. D. McGuire. 
Enrolled, 47. 

Company I, enlisted at Greensboro 12 July, 1862. . 
Captain — H. O. Stone. 

Lieutenants — J. H. Ellis, D. S. Nations, Nathaniel Williams. 
Enrolled, 75. 

. Company K,. enlisted at Pittsboro 14 June, 1862. ' 
I Captain — W. G. Turner. 

i Lieutenants— J. J. Womble, R. M. Moorehead, W. G. Fuller, J. W. 

Lamar. 
t . Enrolled, 69. 

I ..This regiment was organized August 7, 1862. The above rolls are 
r nearly all of date February, 1863, when the regiment was stationed at 
r- Grenada. 



FOURTH REGIMENT— MINUTE MEN. 

i Colonel— W. C. Bromley. 

f Lieutenant-Colonels — J. J. Stone, died; Thomas Whitesides. 

Major — B. ^L Kilgore. 

Adjutants — John Weatherell, L. F. Gentry. 
\- Surgeon — J. L. Wooten. 

I Quartermasters — George P. Boon, A. E. Love. 

I This regiment was organized at Grenada 25 August, 1862. -Mentioned 

[ in official records as with Hebert's Brigade, March, 186^. 

Company A, Captain G. W. Humphreys, enrolled 45, Lafayette 
County. 

Company B, Captain W. D. S. Bowen, enrolled 22, Itawamba Chivalr>'. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 891 

Company C, Captain J. M. Carloe, enrolled 72. 

Company D, Captain W. Gwartley, enrolled 72. 

Company E, Captain E. L. Hawkins, enrolled 55. 

Company F, Captain C. D. Fountain, enrolled 44. 

Company G, Captain- C. H. Williams, enrolled 49. 

Company H, Captain J. M. McDaniel, enrolled 37, Itawamba State 
Guards. | 

Company I, Captains B. M. Kilgore and W. R. W. Sj^ence, enrolled j 

35, Lafayette Defenders. J 

Company K, Captains W. C. Bromley, John W. Jackson and W. A. j 

Mitchell, enrolled 46, Bee Minute Men of Itawamba County. .^ 

Company L, Captain E. B. Holland, enrolled 59. l 

One of these was the Bogue Fala Minute Men, original Captain, ; 

Thomas Whitesides; Lieutenants, James B. White, Thomas E. Godfrey. { 

J. E. Cryder. j 



FIFTH REGIMENT— MINUTE MEN. 

Colonel — H. C. Robinson. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — D. W. Metts. 
Major— S. J. Randall. 

Adjutants — M. P. Ives, M. P. Jones, killed at Vicksburg; J. L. Bolton. 
Quartermasters — J. R. BuiTage, killed at Vicksburg; T. C. Wheaton, 
died July 8, 1863; E. J. Runnells. 
Surgeon — S. H. Smith. 
Assistant-Surgeon — R. M. White. 
Chaplain — J. B. Stone. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant — H. Stone. 

Ordnance Sergeants — E. H. Edgar, J. G, Burwell. * _ . • 

Sergeant-Major — Thomas Neafsey. 
Drum Major— ^Z. M. Hoyt. 
Drummer — J. E. Montgomery. 
Musician — A. Laird. 

Company A, enlisted at Decatur 27 August, 1862. . 
Captain — Montgomery Carleton. 

Lieutenants — John J. Graham, Andrew Gordon, J. L. Bolton, Joel 
W. Loper. 

Enrolled, 100. One killed at Vicksburg. 

Company B, enlisted at Paulding 25 July, 1862. 

Captain— W. C. Porter. 

Lieutenants — J. D. Arlodge, G. L. Lightsey, C. W. Long. 
''.:' Enrolled, 73. Captain Porter, Lieuts. T. J. Bankston and Lightsey 
iand 30 men were surrendered and paroled at Vicksburg. 



892 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company C, enlisted at Marion Station 2 August, 1862. 
Captain — David Maggard. 

Lieutenants — G. S. Pace, Robert Aiken, J. W. Williams. 
Enrolled, 88. Captain John Stinson, Lieuts. Pace, Williams and 
Elias Barefield and 25 men were surrendered and paroled at Vicksburg. 

Company D, enlisted at Enterprise 4 August, 1862. 
Captain— F.'M. Eckford. 

Lieutenants — S. A. Kidd, wounded at Vicksburg; S. M. Hamilton, 
Daniel Brown, C. G. Saunders. 
Enrolled. 82. 

Company E, enlisted at Marion Station 11 August, 1862. 

Captain— J. M. Harmon. 

Lieutenants — John Lamkin, Francis Lansing, Peter Nicholson. 

Enrolled, 54. Captain John Lamkin, Lieuts. E. F. Breland, W. J. 
Sadler, Peter Nicholson and 32 men were surrendered and paroled at 
Vicksburg. One killed, 3 died at Vicksburg. 

Company F, enlisted at Louisville 15 August, 1862. 
Captain — James A. Porter. 

Lieutenants — R. W. Carter, W. V. McCameron, D. W. Metts (elected 
Lieutenant-Colonel September, 1862), J. P. Shaw, Wm. Roach. 

Enrolled, 108. Sixteen died during siege of Vicksburg or soon after. 

Company G, enlisted at Raleigh 23 August, 1862. 
Captain— D. J. Ward. 

Lieutenants — J. J. Boyd, F. W. Speed, Stephen Owens. 
Enrolled, 71. Captain Ward, Lieutenant Boyd and 16 men were sur- 
rendered and paroled at Vicksburg. Three died at Vicksburg. 

Company H, enlisted at Winchester and Ellisville August, 1862. 
- . Captain — A. R. Fairly. 

Lieutenants — J. M. Bates, A. G. Welborn, Thomas Hutchinson. 
Enrolled, 71. Six died at Vicksburg. 

Company I, enlisted at Scooba 16 August, 1862. 

Captains — H. C. Robinson, elected Colonel 5 September, 1862; H. D. 
McLaurin, J. Teal. 

Lieutenants— F. J. Tinsley, D. A. Peden, H. Bell. 

Enrolled, 84. Lieuts. Tinsley, A. J. Lee and Elliott, and 29 men were 
surrendered and paroled at Vicksburg. Seven died during the siege. 
Five died of wounds during the siege, two of disease. 

The above notes regarding the men surrendered and paroled at Vicks- 
burg are from such rolls as are preserved, made after the surrender under 
an act of Legislature providing for compensation, also from Colonel 
Robinson's historic roll. 

The Fifth Regiment was organized at Meridian, September 5-6, 1862, 

and remained there doing heavy guard and fatigue duty until about 

I October 12, when ordered to Columbus, Miss. It was encamped in 



m 



MILITARY HISTORY OF xMISSISSIPPI. 893 

Lowndes County, doing guard duty and picketing until April 7, 1863, 
when it was ordered to Vicksburg, where, during the siege of May 18 to 
July 4, officers and men with few exceptions did their duty faithfully, 
first in the trenches and afterw^ard on guard, patrol and picket duty along 
the river, a large part of the regiment being on duty two hours of every 
six, day and night, during the siege. Some of the best officers of the regi- 
ment were killed during the siege and others died of disease. Adjutant 
Jones was killed when one of the largest shells thrown by Admiral Porter's 
fleet struck the courthouse where the regiment was quartered, killing 
and wounding fifteen or twenty men. After this the regiment was 
moved to the railroad cut, just above the station, where it remained until 
the surrender. (Notes by Colonel Robinson, 1864). 

Gen. John Adams, commanding fourth district, reported the regiment, 
aggregate 384, as stationed north of Columbus, near the fortifications, in 
his report of January i, 1863. The regiment, w^ith the Third Battalion, 
formed the brigade of Gen. J. V. Harris. In February the regiment was 
reported 408 present, 568 aggregate, stationed at Columbus, except one 
company at Meridian. 

Until after the battle of Baker's Creek the State troops on the Vicks- 
burg lines, about 600 in number, including Robinson's Regiment and 
Burgin's Battalion, under the command of Gen. John V. Harris, were with 
Moore's Brigade, guarding the river front at Warrenton and the approaches 
from the lower fords of the Big Black. On May 18 they reported to Gen- 
eral Baldwin, whose brigade occupied a line of works to the north of the 
city, its right near Riddle's house ; on the 19th they went into the trenches 
here, and on the 20th Robinson's Regiment was ordered to the trenches 
on the river front of the city. Later, the two State commands were at- 
tached to Gen. John C. Vaughn's'' Brigade. Vaughn's report for May 31 
shows two of the State troops killed and fifteen wounded, in town, and one 
wounded on the land line. After the surrender July 4, the regiment was 
paroled. At Columbus, September 21, 1863, the regiment and battalion 
were paid off and mustered out. 



FIRST BATTALION— MINUTE MEN. 

Major — W. B. Harper. 
Quartermaster — S. J. Smith. 

Company A, enlisted in Scott County July, 1862. 
Captain — Lewis B. Lyle. 

Lieutenants — Thomas Harris, A. L. Presley, S. D. Kennedy. 
Enrolled, 70. 

Company B, enlisted at Carthage 12 July, 1862. 

Captain — E. B. Howard. 

Lieutenants — H. E. Chambers, Daniel Harkey, John R, Russell. 

Enrolled, 65. , 



t. 894 ' MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSII'PI. 



5-- 



C Company C, Leake County, enlisted at Carthage 12 July, 1862. 

{' Captain — James M. Graham. 

'f - Lieutenants — George W. Agent, Samuel Morrow, John A. Walker. 

i Enrolled, 76. Called into service at Jackson; in service October 7, 

[ 1862 to 14 March, 1863. 

[' Company D, Scott County Rebels, enlisted 5 July, 1862. 

[ - Captain-- -J. M. Hall. 

[ Lieutenants — H. O. Porter, Joshua Spires, W. H. Copeland, D. L. 

;"" Waters. 

U Enrolled, 58. . 

i: Company E, enlisted at Westville August 23, 1862. 

\' Captain— W. T. May. 

= - Lieutenants — John P. Brown, T. A. Youngblood, E. A. Floyd 

r Enrolled, 59. 

f- 

Major Harj^er was commissioned September 5, 1862. The battalion 
is included in the returns of Gen. John Adams, commanding Fourth 
District, in January, 1863. April same, headquarters Jackson. 
j • In his report of the battle of Raymond, May 12, 1863, General Bragg 

L said that when he reached Raymond there was no cavalry in his front to 

^ observe the enemy but "a small State company, under Captain Hall, who 

r were scouting in the direction of Port Gibson." . . . Early next 

t. morning I was informed by couriers from Captain Hall that the enemy 

was advancing rapidly by the road from Utica. Owing to the smallness 
of the mounted force — Captain Hall having but 40 men, and these mostly 
youths from the neighborhood — I was unable to ascertain anything con- 
cerning the strength of the enemy." 



SECO.XD BATTALION— MINUTE MEN. 

Major — Henry F. Cook. 

This battalion is mentioned in the returns of January, 1863, as SS 
effective, with Hebert's Brigade; so also in February and March. With 
Second Regiment and Fourth Battalion, q6 in all. Major H. F. Cook com- 
manding, at Milldale, April 15, 1863. No list of companies. 



THIRD BATTALION— MINUTE MEN. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — Thomas A. Burgin. 

Major— B. B. Moore. 

Adjutant — J. B. Hudson. " . 

Quartermaster - W. II. O'Neal. 

Surgeon — A. K. Branily. 

Sergeant-Major — W. O. Dailey. 

Ordnance Sergeants —W. G. Gillespie, R. Craig, 



1726936 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 



895 



Company A, of Monroe County, enlisted July 29, 1862, at AVicrdeen. 
Captain — B. F. Sims. 

Lieutenants — T. W. Baker, R. Leeman, G. S. Br.yan. 
• Enrolled, 48. 
Lieut. G. S. Bryan, commanding, and 31 men were captured, and 3 
died at Vicksburg. 

Company B, of Monroe County, enlisted July 28, at Aberdeen. 

Captain — D. A. Thompson. 

Lieutenants — W. G. Martin, J. C. Sarter, W. H. Thomas, Thomas F. 
Jones. 

Enrolled, 58. Captain Thompson, Lieutenant Thomas, and 23 others 
captured and 4 died at Vicksburg. 

Com.pan}^ C, enlisted at Macon 30 July, 1862. 

Captain — John B. Hudson. 

Lieutenants — W. W. Calmes, F. M. Carson, J. W. McDaniel. 

Enrolled, 82. Captain Calmes, First Lieutenant J.J. Jenison, Second 
Lieutenant J. H. Bolton and 44 men were captured, and 5 died at Vicks- 
burg. 

Company D, Lowndes County Minute Men, enlisted 4 xVugust, 1862* 

Captains — Jeptha V. Harris, promoted Brigadier-General; E. \V' 
Lacey. 

Lieutenants^ Ruffin Webb, Edward Lacey, J. H. Henry, James T. 
Clark. 

Enrolled, S;^. Died of wounds at Vicksburg, 4; of disease, 5. 

Company E, of Oktibbeha County, enlisted 6 August, 1862. 
Captain — James W. Ervin. 

Lieutenants — T. A. Burgin, promoted Lieutenant-Colonel, September 
24, 1862; W. H. Ellis, John E. Joiner. 



Enrolled, 



Lieuts. J. E. Joiner (First), A. G. Henkel and W. G. 



McVey and 44 men were captured at Vicksburg. 

Company F, of Chickasaw County, enlisted at Houston 9 August, 1S62. 
Captain — W. S. Harrington. 

Lieutenants — J. F. Crockett, James Kennedy, J. M. Paden. 
Enrolled, 79. Above officers, 5 Sergeants, 4 Coq)orals and 45 privates 
were captured at Vicksburg. 

Company G, enlisted at Gainesville 21 September, 1862. 
Captain — Joseph Robards. 

Lieutenants — James A. Steward, C. W. Mitchell, Joseph Wheat. 
Enrolled, 20, 

Green and Perry County Squad, enlisted at Augusta 6 August, iS6r. 
First Sergeant — David M. Carter. 
Enrolled, 53. - 

The battalion was enlisted for an indefinite period, picked men from 
the militia companies in the various counties, for defense of the State, 



896 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. / 

under][orders of the Confederate amiy oflicers, and went into camp at 
Okolona in September, 1862. The field officers were elected September 
2 5 . Early in October they were ordered to Columbus. Gen . John Adams, 
commanding the Fourth District, reported January i, 1863, Third Bat- 
talion, aggregate, 399. "They were sent to Vicksburg by order of Gen- 
eral Pemberton November 28, 1862, and are now there in the actual service 
of the Confederate States. These troops never were mustered into the 
service of the Confederate States, but have been and still are performing 
guard and other duties at this post. The State troops are styled by the 
Governor Minute Men, have arrived at a certain degree of proficiency and 
will compare favorably with Confederate States troops of the same length 
of service," Colonel Burgin, who left Columbus in command of the bat- 
talion, was stationed at Snyder's Bluff, in command of a brigade. This 
battalion was the only organization of State troops listed in Gen. M. L. 
Smith's statement of January, 1863. 

Captain Jeptha V. Harris, of the battalion, was promoted as Brigadier- 
General, commanding Minute Men at Columbus, September 2, 1862. M. 
P. Jones was his Adjutant. January 19, Gen. Ruggles, commanding at 
Columbus, ordered Brig.-Gen. Harris, commanding State troops, to 
remove his brigade, consisting of Fifth Regiment and Third Battalion, to 
a suitable position about one and one half miles north of this post on the 
Aberdeen road^ Return of Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. V. Harris, for 
February, 1863, Third Battalion, 246 present, 413 aggregate, stationed 
at Columbus. Gilleylin's Cavalry, 70 present, 86 aggregate, stationed at 
Cotton Gin, and Fifth Regiment. » 



THIRD BATTALION. 

The troops of General Ruggles' command fought the battle of Palo 
Alto with Colonel Hatch, of Grierson's command, in April, 1863. At the 
outset of this famous raid of Grierson's, Ruggles sent Capt. L. D. Sandidge, 
his Adjutant and Inspector-General, with two guns on platform cars, and 
Col. Thomas A. Burgin, with a part of the State troops at Columbus, to 
reconnoitre the railroad and to protect the bridges across the Tibbee and 
Noxubee and the public stores at Macon. 

Soon after this, Harris' Brigade was transferred to Vicksburg, arriving 
there before the campaign which resulted in the siege. 

During the preliminary maneuvers and until after the battle of Baker's 
Creek, the State troops on the Vicksburg line, about 600 in number, under 
the command of Gen. J. V. Harris, were with Moore's Brigade guarding 
the river front at Warrenton and the approaches from the lower ferries 
of the Big Black. The battalion, under command of Lieut. -Col. T. A. 
Burgin, reported, on May 18, to Gen. W. E. Baldwin, whose brigade 
occupied a line of works to the north of the city, its right near Riddle's 
house, and on the 19th they went into the trenches. Later they were 
transferred to General Vaughn's Brigade, where they were on duty in the 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. * 897 

trenches until the end, suffering frequent losses in killed and wounded, 
of which, however, no official summaries are available. Vaughn's daily 
reports mention i killed, 8 wounded. After the surrender, July 4, 1863, 
they were paroled. August 26, Brig. -Gen. Harris was ordered to have 
the State troops captured at Vicksburg forthwith assembled at Columbus, 
to be paid to the time of their paroles and mustered out of the service. 

Wilkinson County Battalion, Minute Men. An armed force raised in 
July, 1862. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — Robert Semple. 

Major — Wiley B. Bryan. 

Adjutant — Joseph Johnson. 

Company A, Captain James M. Miller, total roll, 59. 

Company B, Captain L. K. Barber, total roll, 59. 

Company C. Captain J. B. Palmer, total roll, 54. 

Company D, Captain T. W. Brown, total roll, 54. 

Company E, Captain A. W. Jeter, total roll, 22. J 

Company F, Captain Frank B. Swayze, total roll, 61. • 

Pathfinders, of Wilkinson County, independent cavalry, State troops. 

Captain — James F. Harris. 1 

Lieutenants — J. T. Netterville, W. S. Feltus, A. P. Rodney. 1 

Enrolled, 60. On duty in July, 1862. (Pay roll). J 

Wilkinson County, organized 27 October, 1862. \ 

Captain — W. B. Bryan. • ■ - i 

Lieutenants — James Martin, Jam.es G. Waller, J. B. Chambers. 
Enrolled, 76. 

Wilkinson County, organized 27 October, 1862. 

Captain — R. A. J. Sessions. 

Lieutenants — Peter Miller, A. L. Richards, Joel Glass. 

Enrolled, 62. 

^ 

FOURTH BATTALION— MINUTE MEN. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — A. J. Postlethwait. 

Major — John D. Fairley. 

Adjutant — James M. Grafton. 

Organized 23 October, 1862. Xo list of companies. 



FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY— MINUTE MEN. 
See Bly^he's Regiment. 

SECOND REGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Sixth Regim.ent, State Records. 

Colonels — J. F. Smith, of State troops; William L. Lowry, of C. S. 
troops. 
29 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Lieutenant-Colonels — William L. Lowry, Joseph A. Johnson. 

Major — L. L. Marshall. 

Adjutant — Sidney Randall. 

Quartermaster — O. H. Pollard. - 

Surgeon — S. N. Walker. 

Company A, Citizen Guards, of Tippah County, enlisted State service 
i6 December, 1862; re-enlisted for two years 16 April, 1864. 

Captains — Solomon G. Street, W. W. Rutherford. 

First Lieutenant — J. H. Mauldin. 

Second Lieutenants — William Reed, J. A. Ford. 

Third Lieutenants — Elliott A. Street, H. H. Barksdale, W. J. Mclntyre, 
W. Bills. 

Enrolled, 123. 

Company B, Johnson Partisans, enlisted in Chickasaw County De- 
cember 26, 1862 ; re-enlisted, 1864. 

Captain— W. K. Posey, J. R. Watkins. 

First Lieutenants — R. B. Moore, J. R. Watkins, G. T. Baber. 

Second Lieutenants — John K. Allen, John White, G. T. Baber, M. E. 
Spraggins. 

Third Lieutenants — T. Otterson, J. L. Watkins. -^ •. 

Enrolled, 120. 

Company C, of Monroe County, organized 31 January, 1863. Not in 
reorganization. 

Captain — W. G. Martin. 
First Lieutenant — J. M. Ray. 
Second Lieutenant — Robert Crenshaw. 
Third Lieutenant — F. M. Irvin. 
Enrolled, 70. 

Tuscumbia Rangers, organized 9 February, 1863. 

Captain — J. F. Smith. • 

Lieutenants — William H. Dillingham, W. G. Dickson, J. A. Caruthers. 

Company D, enlisted at Rocky Ford 13 February, 1863; re-enlisted' 
1864. 

Captain — Wm. H. Wilson. 

First Lieutenants— Wm. W. Furtick, K. B. Hale. 

Second Lieutenants — Wm. J. McClusky, John S. Gallaher, T. J. Wilson. 

Third Lieutenants — N. B. Hale, Andrew J, Dean, J. A. Alexander. 

Enrolled, 98. 

Company E, Mississippi Rangers, enlisted at Elliston Februar>' 18' 
1863; re-enlisted, 1864. 

Captain — Elam M. W^ells. 

First Lieutenants — G. W. McWhorter, Andrew J. Roberts. 
Second Lieutenants — A. J. Roberts, L. J. Latham, E. T. Phillips. 
Third Lieutenants — L, J. Latham, J. H. McWhorter. 
Enrolled, 92. 



I 



MIWTARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 899 



Company F, enlisted in Monroe County, February, 1863; re-enlisted, 

J864. 

Captains — Joseph A. Johnson, Robert Crenshaw, 

First Lieutenants — E. B. Mosley, James M. Ray, S. W. Rye. 

: ^ Second Lieutenants — B. F. Johnson, Robert Crenshaw, John Hill. 

'I - Third Lieutenants— S. W. Rye, John Hill, A. F. Budine. 

^ I Enrolled, 67. 

^ Company G, enlisted at Chickasaw City 11 March, 1863; re-enlisted, 

[ I 1864. 

Captains — George Isbell, T. L. Irby. 
, % First Lieutenants— C. T. Crittenden, W. T. Clarke, T. L. Irby, J. O. 

'lir Clark. 

Second Lieutenants— W.' A. Harold, J. O. Clark, G. W. Owen. 
Third Lieutenants— J. O. Clark, G. W. Owen, J. P. Hall. 
Enrolled, 98. 

i I Company H, J. V. Harris Guards, enlisted at Athens by Captain Gille- 

l f lyn 12 November, 1862, and at Okolona by Captain Park 30 July, 1863 ; 

' I re-enlisted, 1864. 

\ Captains— D. C. Gillelyn, B. Gillel>'n, M. B. Park, O. H. Pollard at 

I reorganization. 

\ First Lieutenants — B. Hilliard, W. P. Boggan, J. R. Lyle. 

f Second Lieutenants — W. P. Boggan, Thomas Chisolm, W. J. Smith. 

II Third Lieutenants — Thomas Chisolm, J. R. Lyle, G. H. Robards. 

I Enrolled, 1863, 114; 1864, 67. This company was on duty with 

I \ General Ruggles, headquarters Columbus, in January, 1863. 

f ^ Company I, enlisted in Chickasaw County February 13, 1864. 

' Captain— W. T. Clarke. 

i First Lieutenant — W. D. Carr. 

1 Second Lieutenant — Richard Thomas. 

Y Third Lieutenant— T. W. McNamee. 

I **A11 captured, consisting of i Lieutenant, 7 privates, about the first 

j June, balance having deserted whilst being transferred to C. S. Army." 

' Company is included in roll of May 20, 1864, however. 

* ' Company K, Pettus Rangers, enlisted at Baldwyn, Pontotoc, etc' 

(in Tippah and neighboring counties January, 1863 — ^January 17, 1864" 
Captains— W. L. Lowry, J. R. Wallis, E. A. Burton. 
(' First Lieutenants — J. A. Horton, G. H. Cunningham, W. J. Page, 
James Watts. 

Second Lieutenants — Wm. M. Robards, E. A. Bniton, G. \. Woods, 
H. W. Chisholm. 

J Third Lieutenants— G. A. Woods, W. J. Page, H. M. Willbanks. 

i^ Enrolled, 74. 

Company L, enlisted in Tishomingo and neighboring counties Jan" 
uary, 1863; re-enlisted, 1864. 
Captain — John'A. Lowry. 



900 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

First Lieutenant — S. W. Frazier. ■'■''-' 

Second Lieutenants — John A. Lowry, T. G. Stocks. 
Third Lieutenant — Wade Moody. 
Enrolled, 69. 

This regiment was organized partly from companies of Partisan Rang- 
ers, of which Sol. G, Street's company was one of the most famous. This 
company was on active duty in December, 1863. Major Emerson, West 
Tennessee Cavalry, reported an encounter January 25, 1863, between 
Bolivar and Ripley, with 15 men, who "were dressed party in Federal 
uniform and were a portion of the noted Sol. Street's command of guerrillas 
who infest that section of the country." General Brayman, at Bolivar, 
reported, March 25, Colonel Miller of Confederate troops killed, "Sol. 
Street said to be desperately wounded." In April, reported by General 
Chalmers as Mississippi Cavalry Company, Capt. Col. G. Street, under his 
command at Panola. Colonel Richardson, commanding in Northeast 
Mississippi, reported in October, 1863, that he had with him two com- 
panies \mder Major Street. January 25, 1864, assigned by General For- 
rest to Richardson's Brigade of Forrest's Cavalry. 

Congress repealed the act permitting partisan companies, February, 
1864. But, before this. General Forrest had given them energetic atten- 
tion, reorganizing, consolidating and appointing officers, "This consoli- 
dation of commands took place principally in troops of Richardson's com 
mand and some scattered bands and battalions, claimed to have been 
raised by Collins, Dawson, Street, Bennett and others." (Report of Col. 
George W. Brent, Adjutant-General, June 10, 1864.) These organiza- 
tions were principally merged in Gholson's Brigade. 

This regiment was organized in the State service April, 1863 (see 
Minute Men), the original field officers being commissioned April 16, the 
date of their election. Lowry was elected Lieutenant-Colonel. The 
regiment was organized under the call of Gen. J. E. Johnston, and, by 
direction of President Davis, the men were not to be interfered -v^-ith by 
conscript officers during their term of service. They were rationed and 
paid by the Confederate States. April, 1863, "in addition to Smith's 
Regiment of State troops (650 men) seven other companies are reported 
by General Gholson, tolerably well mounted and armed with shotguns." 
(Columbus Committee of Defense.) 

At the outset of Grierson's raid. Hatch's Iowa Regiment moved 
through Ripley, April 18, skirmishing through the day. Hatch reported, 
"with Smith's Regiment of Partisan Rangers, organized near there at a 
place called Chest erville." After Hatch left Grierson below Houston and 
started for Macon, he was encountered at Palo Alto, April 22, by Colonel 
Barteau with his Tennessee Regiment, Smith's Regiment, and Inge's and 
Ham's commands, and the battle was going against Hatch when he changed 
front to rear, and opening artillery fire at short range, cut his way through 
the commands of Smith and Ham, though those officers gallantly strove 
to check the attack. Smith's Regiment after this was engaged in the 



it 



!»' 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 901 



pursuit of Hatch as far as Camp Creek, near Birmingham, where a two 
hours' engagement was fought, and the bridge burned to stop the pursuit. 
April 27, Colonel Barteau reported his regiment and Smith's near 
Prairie Mound, Chickasaw County. 

The regiment was with the forces of General Gholson and General 
Ruggles, attacked at Tupelo, May 5, 1863, by Comyn's Brigade of Dodge's 
Division, at the time of the Streight raid from Eastport to the Atlanta 
and Chattanooga Railroad. 

June 22, General Ruggles reported that the regiment was turned over 
to Confederate service about June 4, but had virtually disbanded before 
the inspecting officer arrived. "The following day the enemy burned 
i^M Xew Albany, near which it had been stationed. I respectfully recommend 

tW: that the regiment be disbanded and that the conscripts be immediately 

' put into Confederate service. The regiment has in the meantime been 

directed to concentrate for inspection at Pontotoc, preparatory to receiv- 
ing them into Confederate service.". . 

In July, 1863, when conscript age had been extended to forty-five 
years. General Ruggles reported that Smith's Regiment' and Ham's Bat- 
talion "classed strictly as State troops, had virtually disbanded, no in- 
specting officer having been able to identify the enrollment as sufficiently 
legal to authorize taking them into Confederate service." 

August, 1863, attached to Chalmers' command, during the Federal 
raid from the Big Black River and LaGrange, Tenn., to Grenada. Then 
disbanding on account of expiration of service, but some new companies 
... were recruiting near CarroUton. August 31, Capt. J. T. Lawler, of the 

lY Seventh Tennessee, was sent to De Soto County to take command of the 

H companies composing the regiment. Lieut. -Col. Lowry was reported in 

if command in September. General S. D. Lee urged that the regiment, then 

II near West Point, should be reorganized. 

\ General Chalmers assigned the regiment and other State troops in the 

northeastern district to the command of Colonel Richardson, who was 
succeeded by General Ferguson. Colonel Lowry 's Regiment was on the 
front line of the district of Northeastern Mississippi in October, 1863, under 
the command of General Gholson, State troops. 



agreement with him for the turning over of the State Cavalry organiza- 
tions to the Confederate service, but in November, 1863, General John- 
, _ ston reported that Governor Pettus never carried out the agreement and 

V r that Governor Clark had deferred the subject to the Legislature. Gov- 

ernor Clark hoped all obstacles to immediate transfer would be removed. 
October 28, 1863, Colonel Richardson, commanding in Northeast Missis- 
sippi, reported: "Colonel Lowry, Major Ham and Major Harris have 
^ been assigned to me, but they are State troops and refuse to obey my 

|f orders, but promise co-operation. They are under the command of 

^1 General Gholson, and are now in the front line of my district." There 

^ was a clash between Colonel Lowry and General Ferguson in December, 

m which led General S. D. Lee to write that the State troops "have been 



902 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

inefficient from the want of proper understanding between the Confederate 
States and State authorities and from no fault of the men." 

In General Forrest's arrangements to meet the cavalry expedition 
from Memphis under Gen. Sooy Smith in February, 1864, he sent "Major- 
General Gholson with the State forces under his command to Palo Alto to 
watch any movement of the enemy from the direction of Houston." 
General Smith reported that in his advance he was met by an outpost of 
State troops under Gholson. This was ten miles south of Okolona, at an 
important road forking, where Gholson 's camp had been, and where the 
General was found with part of his command, who made a warm fight 
before retiring. The battles about Pontotoc followed, after which 
Gholson was ordered to press the retreating Federals across the Talla- 
hatchie, Forrest's command having been exhausted in repelling the 
Federal cavalry charge ten miles from Pontotoc. Gholson kept up the 
pursuit toward Memphis. ' 

At Dresden, Tenn., having returned from his raid to Paducah, March 
27, General Forrest wrote to Lieutenant-General Polk at Demopolis: 
"Have dispatched Gholson, at Tupelo, to "m-eet prisoners at' Corinth and 
take them to you." General Gholson covered Forrest's communications 
with the Confederate headquarters while he was in Tennessee. Gholson 
had about 550 prisoners at Aberdeen, April 9. 

General Gholson reported with him near Buena Vista, March 17, 1864, 
Lieut.-Col. Lowry's Regiment, aggregate 350, with McGuirk's Regiment 
and Ham's and Harris' Battalions. 

The brigade was transferred to the Confederate States service May i, 
1864, as a result of the efforts of General Forrest, who went into North 
Mississippi in October, 1863, to reorganize the scattered companies, par- 
ticularly in the northeast, General Chalmers having the northwest pretty 
well in hand. Lowry, Johnson and Marshall were commissioned May 3, 
1864, as field officers of the "Sixth Regiment Cavalry." 

May 10, 1864, Col. William L. LoWry commanding, in independent 
brigade (Gholson 's) commanded by Col. John McGuirk. May 22, by 
order of General Forrest, Grig. -Gen. S. J. Gholson assigned as command- 
ing officer of the brigade of Mississippi State troops recently turned over 
to the Confederate States, now commanded by Colonel McGuirk. List 
June I, brigade attached to Buford's Division, Forrest's Cavalry. 

Sherman, to Stanton, June 14: "Forrest has only his owm cavalry 
which had started for North Alabama, and the militia imder Gholson. 
I cannot understand how he could defeat Sturgis with 8,000 m^en." 

The brigade was transferred to Gen. Wirt Adams' command in Jime, 
1864, but was ordered northward during Sturgis' raid, which was followed 
by the raids of A. J. Smith from jMemphis and Slocum from Vicksburg. 
General Slocum marched from Vicksburg July 2, 1864, with 2.200 in- 
fantry, 600 cavalry and six gims, to destroy the railroad bridge which had 
been rebuilt at Jackson. At the same time A. J. Smith's formidable 
expedition was advancing against Forrest. Gholson's Brigade returned 
to the vicinity of Jackson in time to move under General Adams' com- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 903 

mand in an attempt to cut off Slocum's expedition as it retreated from the 
capital. There was severe fignting on the 6th near Jackson, and Lowry's 
Regiment was conspicuous in the fight, July 7, about two miles east of 
Clinton, making a bold but^^^ineffectual attempt to capture a battery. 
Captain Irby was killed. Captain Crenshaw and Lieut. G. H. Roberts 
mortally, and Capt. J. R. Watkins, severely wounded. Total casualties 
10 killed or mortally wounded, 21 wounded. A newspaper account said 
that no men of the regiment charged a battery supported by four regi- 
ments of infantry and were within twenty paces of the^battery when with- 
drawn by General Gholson, who was severely wounded. General Adams 
had about a thousand men, including Scott's and Powers' Regiments. 
The casualties of Gholson 'sBrigade^were 8 killed, 69 wounded, 3 miss- 
ing. Slocum's casualties were 33 killed, 158 wounded, 30 missing. 

In the latter part of July Gholson's Brigade, about 450 or 500 strong, 
was in Georgia. They took part, dismounted, in the battle of July 28, 
near Atlanta, under Gen. S. D. Lee, Major Marshall commanding the 
regiment, and had Sergt. Niblet, of Company A, killed, and 9 wounded. 
(See Third Cavalry for notice of brigade.) 

General Gholson, with 250 mounted men, skirmished against the 
advance of General Grierson's raiders from Memphis on the jNIobile and 
Ohio Railroad in December, 1864, falling back through Okolona and 
meeting reinforcements at Egypt, 700 men under Lieutenant-Colonel 
Burke and King's Battery mounted on flat cars, from Mobile. They were 
attached at Egypt, on the morning of December 28. General Grierson, 
with the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, attacked Gholson's command behind a 
railroad embankment and was held in check until a charge was made by 
the Fourth Illinois Cavalry. General Gholson was wounded (lost an 
arm), with 15 or 20 others of his command, and a number captured. 
Burke took position in a stockade and after a stubborn fight, in which 
Karge's Brigade had 90 killed and wounded, w-as compelled to surrender 
with 500 men. General Gholson was left at Egypt by General Grierson, 
with 35 or 40 severely wounded of the Second New Jersey Cavalry, under 
the care of Surgeon Krauter ofjthat regiment. 

Colonel Lowry was in command of the brigade at Palo Alto, January 
24, 1865. General Gholson, at Aberdeen, was notified in February, 1865, 
that the Secretary of War had "no authenticated transfer of your brigade 
to the Confederate service." General Chalmers, by direction of General 
Forrest, notified him that the regiments of his command would necessarily 
be consolidated and placed in some other brigade. "He desires me to say 
that he has a high appreciation of your gallantry and capacity as a soldier 
and officer, and that if you should ever again be fit for active field duty, 
which he thinks highly improbable, he will endeavor to give you a suitable 
command." 

February 18, 1865, Gholson's Brigade ordered consolidated in one 
regiment to be commanded by Colonel Ashcraft, and assigned to Arm- 
strong's Brigade. (See Ashcraft's Regiment.) The brigade was then 
near Columbus, Miss. Armstrong's Brigade was distinguished for gal- 



d04 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

lantry in the defense of Selma against assault April 2, 1865. Many were 
killed, wounded and made prisoners when the city was carried by Wilson's 
Cavalry. 

The brigade was paroled under Lieutenant-General Taylor's capitu- 
lation of May 4, 1865, 



THIRD REGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Colonel — John McGuirk. 

Lieutenant-Colonels — James A. Barksdale, 1863; H. H. Barksdale, 
1864-65. 

Majors— B. M. Kilgore, F W. Webb. 
Adjutant — Wm. Joe W^alker. 

Quartermasters — H. E. Williamson, F. M. Griffin. 
Commissary" — Perry M. Morgan. 
Ordnance Sergeant — Robert F. Hubert. 
Quartermaster-Sergeant — Robert R. Williamson. 
Commissary Sergeant — William F, Baker. 
Surgeons — R. B. Dandridge, J. F, Butler. 
Assistant Surgeons Reid, A. F. Clayton. 

Company A, organized September 22, 1862. 
Captain — Thomas Still well. 
First Lieutenant — S. J. Chester. 
Second Lieutenant — Lewis Malone. 
Third Lieutenant — H. S. Rogers. 

Company B, organized April 10, 1863. 
Captain — M. L. Ferris. 
First Lieutenant— Thomas E. Hogg. 
Second Lieutenant — W. M. Swindell. 
Third Lieutenant — James Hogg. 

Company C, organized 22 April, 1863; reorganized 25 April, 1864, a^ 
Company A. 

Captain— T. J. Kyle. 

First Lieutenant — X. B. Towns, E. M. Fewell. 
Second Lieutenant — F. J. Dudley, Joseph Fox. 
Third Lieutenant— M. L. Rives, L. P. Pipkin. 
Enrolled, 1S64, 49. 

Company D, organized April 24, 1863; reorganized April 25, 1864, as 
Company C. 

Captain — John W Logan. 

First Lieutenant — Samuel H. White. 

Second Lieutenants — W. H. Dow, James Miller. 

Third Lieutenants — J. H. Rowland, Josiah S. Ford. 

Enrolled at organization, 80. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 905 

Company E, organized April 24, 1863; reorganized 23 April, 1864, as 
Company C. 

Captain— T. M. Griffin. 

First Lieutenant — S. S. Fatherree, J. F. Peeler. 

Second Lieutenants — R. C. Stewart, Thomas J. Grafton. 

Third Lieutenant — Aaron Price. 

Enrolled at reorganization, 52. 

Company F, Barksdale Rangers, of Yalobusha, organized i June, 
1863; reorganized April 30, 1864, as Company H. 
Captains — H. H. Barksdale, J. L. Brannon. 
First Lieutenant — E. J. Hardin. 
Second Lieutenants — J. E. Gillis, H. P. Bridges. 
Third Lieutenants — J. E. Holley, W, L. Brannon. 
Enrolled, at reorganization, 66. 

Company G. 

Captains — James A. Barksdale, James D. McKie. 

First Lieutenant — Perry M. Morgan. 

Second Lieutenants — James D. McKie, L, C. Underwood. 

Third Lieutenant — W. D, Plurt. 

Company H, Kilgore Rangers, organized June 7, 1863; reorganized 
May I, 1864, as Company D. 

Captains — B. M. Kilgore, G. W. Gwartny (ley.)? 
First Lieutenants — G. W. Gwartney, Samuel Downing. 
Second Lieutenants — J. H. Alexander, E. H. Bogard. 
Third Lieutenants — J. M. Johnson, R. A. Butler. 

Company E, reorganized regiment, 24 March, 1864. 

Captain — E. L. Richmond. 

First Lieutenant^ — William O. Cochrane. 

Second Lieutenant — C. G. Yarbrough. 

Third Lieutenant — E. Q. Withers. 

Enrolled, 51. 

Company F, reorganized regiment, 25 April, 1864. 

Captain— J. G. Kennedy. 

First Lieutenant — W. H. Thornton. 

Second Lieutenant — B. F. Bibb. 

Third Lieutenant — G. W. Sadler, 

Enrolled. 74. 

Company G, reorganized regiment, 25 April, 1864, 

Captain— S. T. Daniel. 

First Lieutenant — Joseph L. Hamcr. 

Second Lieutenant — James G. Hamer. 

Third Lieutenant — C, C, Wilkins. 

Enrolled. 68. 



906 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

Company I, reorganized regiment, 25 April, 1864. 

Captain— C. W. Orr, enlisted October, 1863. 

First Lieutenant — Charles M. Richards, enlisted July, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant — R. F, Dickens. 

Third Lieutenant— R. B. Shugog. 

Enrolled, 90. 

Company K, reorganized regiment, 25 April, 1864. 
Captain— R. H. Turner. 
' First Lieutenant — John T. Dubard. 
Second Lieutenant — J. H. Carr. 
Third Lieutenant— J. W. Griffis. 
Enrolled, 88. 

The companies were originally organized as Minute Men in 1862, and 
re-enlisted for twelve months in 1863, under the call of Gen. J. E. Johnston, 
it being understood between the Governor and President Davis that the 
men should be exempt from conscription during their term of service. 
They were understood to be rationed and paid by the Confederate States, 
but the pay was generally several months in arrears. It is first mentioned 
as Mississippi cavalry, three companies, Col. John McGuirk, with General 
Chalmers, headquarters Panola, April, 1863. April 8, at Holly Springs, 
ordered to take post near Chulahoma. April 19, detailed to defend 
Panola, time of Federal raid. May 30, assigned to brigade of Gen. J. 
Z. George, State troops. Colonel McGuirk was commissioned June 9, 
1863; other ofncers June 11. 

The regiment served under General George in the operations attending 
the raid of Colonel Mizner, June 15-25, 1863, who set out from LaGrange, 
Tenn., with orders to break the railroad south of Panola, turn on Chalmers 
and sweep the country of horses, mules, negroes and the new crop of 
wheat. Colonel McCuUoch skirmished with Mizner after he had crossed 
the Tallahatchie at Wyatt, and, in view of the Federal strength, General 
George retreated from Panola across to Yockeney, sending one company 
to protect the railroad bridge. The whole command moved to that point, 
but too late to prevent the destruction of the bridge. Colonel McGuirk, 
with his regiment, then pursued the Federal column on its return to 
LaGrange, swimming the Tallahatchie at Belmont, overtaking Mizner at 
Tyro and pursuing eighty miles to Hudsonville, "where, on Sunday 
evening, he overtook and chastised him handsomely, killing and woimd- 
ing several and capturing- 27 prisoners with about the same number of 
horses and equipments, an extraordinary achievement," considering the 
arduous service of the command. George's headquarters were at Grena- 
da, and Colonel McGuirk was in command of the brigade in July, 1863. 

July 21, General George reported that a detachment from Colonel 
McGuirk's Regiment had cut the railroad and taken 15 prisoners near 
Germantown. In July regiment was ordered to Vaiden for enlistment 
in Confederate service. General George reported, "I fear half of Mc- 
Guirk's Regiment cannot be gotten to Vaiden." The enlistment was not 
made. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 907 

In the field during the Federal raid from the Big Black and LaGrange, 
Tenn., to Grenada, August, 1863, of which there are no reports. Regiment 
then in Chalmers' Cavalry command, 200 in number, Colonel McGuirk 
commanding, but scattered between Panola and Grenada, arresting 
deserters and conscripts. Chalmers could not collect a command 
sufficient to hold Grenada, which the raiders occupied August 20, break- 
ing the railroad and burning the rolling stock. The regiment,, with 
Chalmers' command, moved from Grenada to Abbeville September 12. 
Assigned to Slemon's Brigade October 18. "The battalion under the j 

command of Lieutenant-Colonel Barksdale" was in Chalmers' command, ' 

September, 1863. 

This regiment, the Seventh Tennessee (Colonel Duckworth), A. H. 
Chalmers' Eighteenth Battalion, and one rifled gun of McLendon's Bat- 
tery, in all about 850 men, constituted the immediate comm.and of 
General Chalmers when he was collecting forces for the raid to Collier- 
ville, Tenn , in October, 1863. With this command Chalmers was about 
to move to Salem for a juncture with Richardson's Brigade, when a 
column of Illinois cavalry, under Colonel McCrillis, advanced from 
LaGrange, Tenn., against Holly Springs, whither Chalmers moved on 
the 5th. McCrillis, with 750 cavalry, heard on his approach that Chal- 
I ^ mers was ahead of him, and began to recross the Coldwater, when Chal- 

I i mers attacked at Lockhart's Mill, October 6. There was a brisk skirmish, 

J 

in which the four howitzers posted by McCrillis on the north bank of the 

river, played an important part. Chalmers then moved to Salem, and 
on the morning of the 8th set out for Collierville, leaving Hovis' Regiment j 

to occupy Salem. Meanwhile McCrillis had returned from LaGrange to 1 

the vicinit}' of Salem with 1,250 cavalry and mounted infantry and six ; 

guns. He attacked Hovis and drove him from the town, and Chalmers, 
learning of this, at a distance of ten miles, returned rapidly and attacked 
McCrillis, who occupied a strong position on a long ridge, with his skir- 
f\ mishers through the town. Chalmers had been reinforced and had 1,200 

in the battle, but only one piece of artillery, which was useless after the j 

third fire. After three hours' hard fighting, said Chalmers, the enemy j 

was driven from every position. "In this affair the Second Missouri ^ 

Cavalry (Lieutenant-Colonel McCulloch), Third Regiment Mississippi 
State Cavalry (Colonel ^IcGuirk), and the Eighteenth Mississippi Bat- 
talion (Major Chalmers) bore the brunt of the conflict, and although the 
last two were composed almost entirely of untried men, they behaved • 

with a gallantry equal to that which has ever distinguished the veterans I 

of the Second Missouri Cavalry." Colonel McGuirk, who moved from his 
camp at Wyatt, was the first to reinforce Hovis, and was ordered to take 
the two regiments and command the front attack, but Chalmers decided 
to also attack in front. The regiment, under Lieutena.nt-Colonel Barks- 
dale, charged the Federal position at Hamer's house, drove the skirmish 
line from the village and compelled the retreat of the artillery from a 
hill. Captain Hartin and Lieutenant Kennedy were wounded in the 

i fight. Captains Logan. Farris, Griffin, Barksdale, Mclvie, Webb and 

I 



I, 



u. . J 



908 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Lieutenants Thornton and Towns gallantly commanded the companies. 
The casualties of McGuirk's Regiment was i killed. 22 wounded; of the 
rest of Chalmers' troops 5 wounded. General Sweeney, commanding at 
LaGrange, reported that on October 8, "our cavalry, under Colonel 
McCrillis, with the mounted infantry and a section of Captain Tannrath's 
Battery, under Colonel Phillips, were attacked by the enemy at Salem 
and driven back on the railroad with considerable loss." In the night 
following Chalmers was reinforced by Richardson's Brigade, about 850 
men. Colonel Hatch on the other side came up from LaGrange with 
750 Union cavalry, and no artillery, expecting to join McCrillis and 
Phillips, but finding them gone, he sent for reinforcements from Davis* 
Mills. Chalmers remained most of October 9 in line of battle at Hamar's 
house, with his force of over 2,000 men and six guns, believing that Hatch 
had against him "nine regiments and nine pieces of artillery." He 
reported that "there was some slight skirmishing, but the enemy did 
not make his appearance in force." Hatch received orders to fall back 
to LaGrange, which made it possible for Chalmers to carry out his plan 
of a raid on Collierville, while Hatch, with a force of 2,200, returned 
again to hunt for»him at Salem and Holly Springs. Chalmers moved 
to Holly Springs on the loth for food and ammunition, and approached 
Collierville early on the nth. In the disposition for attack, Colonel 
McGuirk, w4th his own regiment and First Mississippi Partisans, was 
sent to gain possession of the town and attack the fort from the rear. 
The movements on the left and right drove the garrison to the rifle pits 
and part of them into the fort, and possession was taken of the train of 
cars on which General Sherman was traveling with a battalion of regulars 
as an escort, but the movement on the rear was not so successful, and 
General Chalmers ascribed this to Colonel McGuirk's delay at the cavalr>^ 
camp northwest of town. In the attack upon the cavalry camp, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Barksdale commanded the regiment, about 175 men. 
He reported that after the First Partisans were repulsed, his regiment 
advanced upon the camp, firing steadily, and drove the enemy to shelter 
in the woods and swamp, and that he never saw men, even in the Army 
of Northern Virginia, deport themselves with more gallantry. He gave 
special mention to the conduct of Maj. B. M. Kilgore, who fell wounded 
while leading a charge, and to Captains Logan, Barksdale, Griffin, 
Gwartney and Lieutenants Towns and Thornton, company commanders. 
Lieutenant Turner, Company H, and Lieutenants Thornton and Tver, 
Company K, collected the prisoners, 89 in number. Lieut. J. H. Alex- 
ander brought off 18 wagons with mule teams. Sergeant Grizelle, the 
color bearer, distinguished on this as on former fields for gallantry, fell 
with a severe wound as he was carrying the flag, with a captured flag in 
his other hand. Lieutenant White, Company D, carried the colors 
forward. The casualties of the regiment were i killed, 6 wounded. 
The attack on Collierville failed, and General Chalmers retreated. At 
the crossing of the Tallahatchie, near Wyatt, October 13, the Confederate 
command, under Col. R. V. Richardson, was attacked by Hatch. Mc- 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 909 

Guirk recrossed the river with his two regiments, about 300 men, dis- 
mounted, and two guns of the Buckner Battery, and took position to 
check the pursuit. A body of Federals under the famous Captain 
Hodgman, Seventh Kansas Jayhawkers, occupied a log house, which 
Barksdale and his men charged in the face of a heavy artillery fire from 
two batteries. The house was taken and Hodgman wounded and cap- 
tured. About dark the regiment was again in action with Ilovis' Regi- 
ment, repelling twice the Federal attack. It came up with a charge and 
a yell, said McGuirk. About 9 o'clock the rear guard, volunteers from 
this regiment, crossed the river. The casualties were i killed, 6 wounded, 
3 missing. Captain Logan, Acting Major; Captain Barksdale, Lieu- 
tenant Hurt (commanding Company G), were mentioned for gallantry. 
For their service in this expedition, including the engagements at Salem, 
Collierville and Wyatt, honorable mention was given to Lieut. Col. 
James A. Barksdale, Major; B. M. Kilgore, Adjutant; (Captain) W. 
Joseph Walker, Sergeant-Major E. L, Richmond, Orderly C. C. Harris, 
Capt. H. E. Williamson, Quartermaster; Lieut. P, M. Morgan, Com- 
missary; W. F. Baker, Acting Commissary. 

The regiment, under the command of Colonel Barksdale, participated 
with George's Regiment in the gallant cavalry charge at Collierville, 
Tenn., November 3, 1863, which was repulsed by the unexpected volleys 
from revolving rifles of the Second Iowa, at the railroad. The advance 
of this regiment was on the Quinn's Mill road, and the attack was gal- 
lantly made, as was testified to both by Chalmers and Hatch, the officers 
commanding on each side. On the retreat, after crossing the Cold- 
water near Quinn's Mill, the regiment joined in the stubborn resistance 
which prevented their pursuers from crossing until the next day. The 
casualties of this regiment were the heaviest in General Chalmers' com- 
mand — I killed, 3 officers and 19 men wounded, 

November 30, the same two regiments, crossing the Coldwater at 
very high water, moved into Tennessee with Chalmers' expedition in 
support of S. D. Lee and Forrest, reaching Moscow^ December 4. Slemons' 
brigade burned the railroad trestle over Grisson's Creek, between Moscow 
and Lafayette. 

Colonel Meek, Eleventh Illinois, reported that his command, which 
had gathered up horses and mules and burned grain and cotton and 
shops on the Holly Springs road by w^ay of Chulahoma, passed through 
Holly Springs on the evening of the 21st, stopped to feed on the Hernando 
road two miles from Hudsonville, and left that road for the LaGrange 
road when one of his pickets was shot, leaving two companies to bring 
in the wounded man. Later he sent back Major Funke with one company, 
hearing that a fight was on. McGuirk had come in by a by-road, and 
cut off the three companies, which extricated themselves with difficulty, 
losing I killed, 2 wounded and 26 prisoners. 

Regiment assigned to Slemons' Brigade in the organization of the 
cavalry under S. D. Lee, January, 1864. 



910 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

February 2, 1864, McGuirk skirmished near LaGrange, Tenn. The 
regiment participated in General Forrest's defeat of Sooy Smith's expedi- 
tion near Okolona, February 20-22, 1864, and had 3 wounded (see 
Second Cavalry). At the outset of the famous raid of Forrest and 
Chalmers through Tennessee in April, 1864, Colonel McGuirk with his 
regiment and the First Partisans made a demonstration from Holly 
Springs tOY.-ard Memphis, which was so effective as to make practicable 
the capture of Fort Pillow April 12. 

In criticising the enlistment in State regiments to avoid conscription 
in the Confederate service General Chalmers wrote, January 6, 1S64: 
"These State companies have done more harm than good. I do not 
include in this remark Colonel McGuirk's Regiment — that has done 
good service — but both he and his officers have long since been convinced 
that the regiment would be more effective if it were regularly in Con- 
federate service." 

Regiment ordered to report at Macon to the Governor for special and 
important service, March 3, 1864. Aggregate of regiment, 325. Gov- 
ernor Clark appointed April 30, 1864, as the day for State cavalry to 
assemble at Tupelo for transfer to the Confederate service. "As the 
regiment of Colonel McGuirk is one of those to be transferred, it is very 
desirable that they should be paid the amount due them for the time 
they were in Confederate service, some five or six months are due them, 
also pay for horses killed in battle." The Governor declared they were 
in as good a state of discipline and as effective as any troops, and he 
consented to their transfer to the Confederate service. The regiment 
was reorganized at Oxford in the latter part of April, 1864, and the 
Colonel commissioned April 25, 1864. May i, 1864, the Gholson Brigade 
was turned over to the Confederate States, Colonel McGuirk command- 
ing brigade. May 22, General Forrest ordered Brigadier-General Gholson 
to take command of his brigade. The brigade was attached for a time 
to Forrest's command, and then transferred to the command of Wirt 
Adams before Vicksburg, being ordered to Canton, May 26. 

Gholson's Brigade was withdrawn from Adams by General Forrest 
before Slocum's raid to Jackson, July, 1864, but rejoined General Adams 
near Jackson, in time to participate in the attack upon Slocum's column 
about four miles west of Jackson on the evening of July 6, when McGuirk's 
Regiment charged and attempted to cut off the wagon train. Another 
attack was made in the morning of the 7th and a third, near Clinton, by 
Lowry's Regiment. McGuirk's Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant- 
Colonel Barksdale, had 8 wounded, i missing. General Gholson was 
severely wounded and Colonel McGuirk took command of the brigade. 

Later in July the brigade was transferred to Georgia and was tempora- 
rily assigned to Walthall's Division on the Atlanta lines, July 25, and 
put with Reynold's Brigade. General Reynolds reported that McGuirk's 
command joined him just before he marched out to the battle on the 
Lickskillet road, July 28, and they marched out on the left of his line. 
Reynolds charged the Federal line, behind log works, and was repulsed 



MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 911 

after a bloody fight. He reported that Colonel McGuirk, under orders 
from some field officer, charged the works a second time, but was com- 
pelled to fall back with considerable loss. "The loss in General Gholson's 
Brigade, some 450 strong, was 144 killed, wounded and missing." The 
casualties of McGuirk's Regiment was 8 killed, including Major T. W. 
Webb and Lieut. S. H. White, commanding Company C. Captain E. L. 
Richmond was dangerously wounded, Captains Daniel and Orr wounded 
and missing. Total wounded 43, including Lieuts. James Miller, R. A. 
Butler, W. O. Cockram, W. H. Thornton and John Griffin. 

In the battle of Jonesboro, Ga., August 31, Colonel McGuirk, of 
Gholson's Brigade, reported to General Granbury with his regiment, 
dismounted, and a battalion of engineer troops (Major Presstman), and 
aided in the rout of the enemy in their front. Granbury wrote: "Seeing 
them endeavoring to rally at a crossing opposite my left flank, I ordered 
Colonel McGuirk to advance his two battalions in double-quick time, 
which was executed by that officer promptly and gallantly, and in time 
for his command to deliver a few volleys before the enemy escaped 
beyond the river." Moving his whole brigade up to Flint River, Gran- 
bury dressed his line on the position of Colonel McGuirk. September 
19, General Hood, at Palmetto, ordered Gholson's Cavalry Brigade, then 
at Opelika, up the west side of the Chattahoochee River, opposite Newnan. 
September 28, with Ross' Brigade, formed Ross' Division of Jackson's 
Cavalry. December 12, 1864, McGuirk's Regiment was en route throug^i 
Montgomery to Mobile. December 16-17, it took part in the pursuit of 
the Federal expedition to Pollard. January 6, 1865, regiment had been 
ordered to Brandon. January 20, marching to concentrate with Mabry's 
Brigade at Canton. February, 1865, McGuirk's Regiment ordered to 
report to Gen. Wirt Adams. 

Paroled tmder the capitulation of Lieut. -Gen. Richard Taylor made 
at Citronelle, May 4, 1865. 



ASHCRAFT'S BATTALION. 

Third Battalion, State Cavalry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — Thomas C. Ashcraft. 
Major — E. L. Hankins. 
Adjutant — L. S. Owen. 
Quartermaster — James Noe. 
Assistant Surgeon — N. R. McGaughey. 

Company A, enlisted January 9, 1864. 
Captain — James S. Davis. 
First Lieutenant — W. R. Bounds. 
Second Lieutenant — C. H. Jones. 
Jimior Lieutenant — E. B. Reich. 
Enrolled, 75. 



912 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company B, enlisted January 23, 1864, at Chesterville. 

Captain — John C. Fears. 

First Lieutenant — A. J. Gayle. 

Second Lieutenant — J. W. Cullen. 

Junior Lieutenant — J. T. StovalL 

Enrolled, 78. 

Company C, enlisted at Marietta, February 13, 1864. 

Captain — John Patton. 

First Lieutenant — Younger Pitts. 

Second Lieutenant — W. J. Pitner. 

Junior Lieutenant — G. W. Foster, 

Enrolled, 77. 

Company D, enlisted at Saltillo, February 13, 1864. 

Captain — C. F. Kohlheim. 

First Lieutenant — William A. Hall. 

Second Lieutenant — A. K. Harper. 

Enrolled, 65. 

Company E, enlisted at Richmond, December, 1863; re-enlisted 
May 2, 1864. 

Captains — John F. Story, R. J. Thurmond. 
First Lieutenant — F. G. Thomas. 
Second Lieutenant — William E. Thomas. 
Third Lieutenants— S. E. Taylor, W. F. White. 
Enrolled, 49. 

Company F, enlisted at Fulton, Februar\' 8, 1864; reorganized May 
4, 1864. 

Captains — E. S. Hankins, J. M. Sallis. 
First Lieutenant — S. W. Hankins. 
Second Lieutenant — E. T. Leech. 
Jtmior Lieutenant— T. A. Mann. 
Enrolled, 83. 

The above is the organization of Ashcraft's Battalion in the Con- 
federate States service. Lieut. W. T. Stricklin's company seems to have 
been attached as Company A to Ashcraft's Battalion in the State service 
before the transfer. 

The battalion was part of the brigade of State troops under General 
Gholson, transferred to the Confederate States service May i, 1864. 
Field officers, as above, were elected May 3. 1S64. In June battalion 
was consolidated with Mai. T. W. Harris' Battalion to form Ashcraft's 
Regiment, w^hich see. 

ASHCRAFT'S REGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Colonel — Thomas C. Ash craft. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — Thomas W^. Harris. 
Major — E. L. Hankins. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 913 

Company A, Volunteer Cavalry, of Tishomingo County, organized 24 
January, 1863. 

Captain — J. M. Carpenter. 
First Lieutenant — P. H. Michaels. 
Second Lieutenant — Joel W. Booth. 
Third Lieutenant — Alexander Johnson. 

Company B, Captain Cole; Company C, Captain Wood; Company D, 
Captain Davis; Company E, Captain Fears; Company F, Captain Patton; 
Company G, Captain Kohlheim; Company H, Captain Rye; Company I, 
Captain Thurmond; Company K, Captain Sallis. (See Ashcraft's and 
Harris' Battalions). 

This regiment was formed in June, 1864, from the consolidation of 
Ashcraft's and Harris' Battalions, and Carpenter's company, transferred 
to the Confederate States service May i, 1864, as a part of Gholson's 
Brigade in Northeast Mississippi. The brigade was then under the com- 
mand of General Forrest, but about the time of the consolidation was 
assigned to the command of Gen. Wirt Adams, in Western Mississippi. 
They were detached from Adams just before General Slocum made his 
raid on Jackson from Vicksburg, but joined Adams north of the city May 
5, and took part in the attacks on the Federal column between Jackson 
and Clinton, as it started on the return march July 6-7. Casualties, 7 
wounded. 

July 28 the brigade, dismounted, was fighting in the battle of Ezra 
Church, west of Atlanta, Ga., with Gen. S. D. Lee's Corps. Major Han- 
kins was in command of the regiment. Among the killed were Captain 
Carpenter, commanding Company A ; and among the wounded Lieutenant 
Lankford of Company B, Captain Sallis, Lieutenant Harper, Captain 
Patton. Casualties of regiment, 4 killed, 37 wounded. (See Third 
Regiment, McGuirk.) The brigade served as cavalry throughout that 
campaign and during Hood's advance into North Georgia. In December 
General Gholson, with a small command, was in battle with Grierson's 
raiders at Egypt. (See Second Cavalry, Lowry). 

The brigade was consolidated early in 1865 while near Columbus, Miss., 
as Ashcraft's Regiment (which see). 



ASHCRAFT'S REGIMENT— CAVALRY (CONSOLIDATED). 

Colonel— T. C. Ashcraft. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — W. P. Curlee. 
Major — L. L. Marshall. 

Company A (Companies B, D, E, G, Lowry's Regiment consolidated). 
Captain — T. Brownrigg. 
First Lieutenant— W. H. Hill. 
Second Lieutenant — George W. Owen. 
Total roll, 48. 



914 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company B (Company A, Ham's Regiment). 
Captain — George W. Bynum. 
First Lieutenant — W, A. Parish. 
Second Lieutenant — K. M. Harrison. 

Company C (Companies C, D, E, G, I, Kof Ham's Regiment). 

Captain — J. R. Wallis. 

First Lieutenant — T. K. Strickland. 

Second Lieutenant — L. P. Brown. 

Company D (Company L, Lowry's Regiment). 

Captain — J. A. Lowry. 

First Lieutenant — S. W. Frazier. 

Second Lieutenant — T. G. Stokes. 

Company E (Company B of Ash craft's Regiment). 

Captain — A. B. Cole. 

First Lieutenant — J. E. Davis. 

Second Lieutenants — Lafayette Weatherell (Lucius Herndon). 

Company F (Companies D, E, G, K of Ashcraft's Regiment). 

Captain — J. C. Fears. 

First Lieutenant — C. S. Morton. 

Second Lieutenant — W. H. Keyes. 

^ Company G (Company C, Ashcraft's Regiment.) 
Captain — S. H. Wood. 
First Lieutenant — W. D. Graves. 
Second Lieutenant — L. P. McCord. 

Company H (Company F, Ham's Regiment). 

Captain — M. W. Howard. 

First Lieutenant — L. M. Cobum. 

Second Lieutenant — A. C. Tatum. 

Company I (Company I of Ashcraft's Regiment). 

Captain — T. J. Rye. 

First Lieutenant — F. G. Thomas. 

Second Lieutenants— W. E. Thomas (L. T. Taylor). 

Company K — (Companies A, H, F or Lowry's Regiment). 
First Lieutenant — J. R. Gilleylen. 
Second Lieutenant — J. L, Laughridge. 

February i8, General Chalmers ordered Colonel Lowry, commanding 
Gholson's Brigade, to consolidate the same into one regiment to be com- 
manded by Colonel Ashcraft. 

Assigned to Armbtrong's Brigade, Chalmers' Cavalry, February, 1865. 
March 20, General Chalmers announced his organization of the regiment 
as above given. 

The regiment was with Armstrong's Brigade in the campaign oc- 
casioned by the raid of Gen. J. H. Wilson through Alabama and Georgia, 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 916 

April and May, 1865. The brigade made a gallant and stubborn defense 
of the works at Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865, fighting as infantry, and many 
were killed, wounded and captured. Those who escaped returned to 
their homes r,nd were paroled under the capitulation of May 4 by Lieut. - 
Gen. Richard Taylor. 



BLYTHE'S CAVALRY. 

First Battalion Cavalry, Minute Men; First Regiment Cavalry, State 
troops; Second Regiment, Partisan Rangers. 
Colonel — Green L. Blythe 
Lieutenant-Colonel — A. C. Edmundson. 
Major — C. W. Bowen. 
Quartermasters — Joseph Carter, T. W. Wilkinson. 

De Soto Partisans, of De Soto County, organized 18 September, 1862. 

Captain — T P. Manning. 

First Lieutenant — A. C. Edmondson. 

Second Lieutenant — Robert Perry. 

Third Lieutenant — Eli Mehary. 

Stillwell's Company, organized in Marshall County, September 22, 
1862. See Third Regiment. 
Captain — Thomas Stillwell. 

Company A, De Soto Partisans, organized in De Soto County 28 June, 
1862. 

Captains — Green L. Blythe, T. P. Manning. 
First Lieutenants — Lewis C. Taylor, A. C. Edmondson. 
Second Lieutenants — T. P Manning, J. R. Perry. 
Third Lieutenants— H. C. Merritt, Eli Mehary. 
Enrolled, 139. 

Bowen's Rangers, Volunteer Cavalry, organized 25 July, 1862. 

Captain — C. W. Bowen. 

First Lieutenant — W. H. Shinpack. 

Second Lieutenant — W. Pitt Eason. j 

Third Lieutenant — T. T. Paine. | 

The above are some of the companies. There is no further informa- 
tion in this department. Green L. Blythe, of De Soto County, was com- . 
missioned Major of the First Battalion of Cavalry, State troops (Minute I 
Men), 25 September, 1862. He was commissioned Colonel of the First 
Regiment Cavalry, State troops, 29 x\pril, 1863. The companies of his 
command were to a considerable extent organized under the act of Con- 
gress authorizing partisan rangers. The command was sometimes 
referred to as the Second Regiment, Partisan Rangers. 

Blythe's Battalion was part of the command collected or attempted 
to be collected by General Chalmers in the region open to raids from 
Memphis, early in 1863. A Federal report, February, 1S63, says: Van- 



916 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Dom's movement "clears our front of all cavalry except that of G. L. 
Blythe's which is operating in the direction of Panola." Three prisoners 
from this command were reported by Gen. Quinby, commanding expedi- 
tion across Nonconnah Creek. February i6, Gen. Hurlbut proposed an 
expedition under Col. A. L. Lee to "sweep around toward Panola and 
Hernando, enveloping Blythe's force and driving them to the Nonconnah 
or into the swamp." February 25, Hurlbut reported "Richardson's 
guerrillas, near Covington, and Blythe's below, still in motion." May 6, 
General Chalmers reported from Oxford, "half of Blythe's Regiment have 
never been in camp." May 16, Capt. T. P. Manning ordered to scout in 
direction of Memphis. May 19, General Chalmers recommended that 
"the regiment commanded by Col. Green L. Blythe be converted into 
Confederate troops." May 19, Hurlbut wrote, ordered Gen. W. S. Smith 
to advance from LaGrange against Chalmers, "Blythe's Battalion is about 
twelve miles south of Memphis, engaged in conscripting and obtaining 
horses." Floyd's company mentioned, appears to have been from along 
the Mississippi River. May 26 Blythe's Regiment in cotmtry west of 
Hernando. May 26, General Chalmers reported : "Colonel Slemons, with 
Second Arkansas and Second Mississippi Partisans, fired on transports 
near Austin without effect. Troops of Ellet's moimted marines were 
disbarked and repulsed, leaving eighteen dead horses. Slemon's casu- 
alties, I Captain and 2 men killed, 12 wounded and 2 missing." 

April 8, driven across Coldwater by Federal expedition. Captain Still- 
well's company engaged. Blythe, with seven small companies, about 
300 according to Federal report, skirmished w^ith Bryant's Infantry 
Brigade, raiding from Memphis, with engagements at Hernando, April 
18, and on the Coldwater, 19th. 

A Federal expedition from Memphis to Hernando May 23-24, 1863, 
reported an encounter with Captain Manning's company near Colonel 
Blythe's plantation, in which three of the command were killed. Cap- 
tain Manning's plantation was in the same vicinity. Another raid passed 
these places May 26. 

July 9, General Chalmers feared that few would re-enlist with the 
possibility of being removed from defense of their homes, but the regi- 
ment could be kept in the service as an organization for service as guer- 
rillas (detached companies). 

July 21, George reported that very few of Blythe's Regiment could be 
gotten to Vaiden for re-enlistment, but he could organize a battalion in 
the regiment, if he had a fair chance. 

Blythe's command served under General George in the operations 
attending the raid of Colonel Mizner, who set out with 1,900 cavalry, 
June 15-25, from LaGrange, Tenn., with orders from Hurlbut to break 
the railroad south of Panola, turn on Chalmers, and sweep the country of 
horses, mules, negroes and the new crop of wheat. George retreated 
from Senatobia across the Yockeney when he had learned the strength of 
Mizner's command and reached the railroad bridge too late to protect it. 
Blythe's Regiment did not accompany McQuick in the pursuit across the 



MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 917 

Tallahatchie, being exhausted. April 29, 1863, Blythe, Edmondson and 
Bowen were commissioned as field officers of the First Regiment, State 
troops. In August the regiment was reported as reorganizing, and not 
available during the Grenada raid. The regiment was reorganized by 
General George. 

When General Chalmers made his second raid to Collierville, Novem- 
ber 3, 1863, he intended to have Major Blythe bum the water tank at 
White's Station; near Memphis, but Chalmers was informed that Blythe 
would not obey Jais orders. The General wrote: "I have already re- 
ported that this command, if allowed to continue its independent action, 
would greatly demoralize my cavalry." 

In 1864-65 Major Blythe was commanding a battalion of State troops, 
in which were included the following: 

Company B, of Senatobia. 

Lieutenants — W. L. Martin, R. O. Moseley, C. G. Callicut. 

Enrolled, 66. 

Company A, of Senatobia. 

Lieutenants — J. F. Walker, Hugh L. Johnson, C. Cooper. 

Enrolled, 66. 



CLAIBORNE LIGHT INFANTRY. 

Captain — A, J. Lewis. . 

Aggregate present, 38, with troops at Baton Rouge, August, 1862, 
listed then as partisan rangers, in October as infantry. In April, 1863, 
on provost duty, Lieut. C. L. Barrot. Served in the Port Hudson lines 
during the siege of May 25 to July 8, 1863, and after the surrender, were 
paroled. 



DAVENPORT'S BATTALION CAVALRY. 

Major — Stephen Davenport. 

Company A, enlisted i July, 1863, at Itawamba. 

Captain — H. B. Brown. 

First Lieutenant — W. J. Priddy. 

Second Lieutenant — J. F. Clifton. 

Third Lieutenant — William Dulaney. 

Roll, 63. 

Company B, enlisted 5 July, 1863, in Itawamba County. 

Captain — W. P. Pardue. 

First Lieutenant — J. T. McDougal. 

Second Lieutenant — W. L. Moody. 

Third Lieutenant — G. Vinyard. 

Roll, 65. 



918 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

Company C, enlisted 8 August, 1863, in Tishomingo County. 

Captain — Charles H. Carter. 

First Lieutenant — William Gilmer. 

Second Lieutenant — William H. Beardin. 

Third Lieutenant — S. G. Champion. 

Roll, 65. 

These companies, previously in Davenport's Battalion, State troops, 
were enlisted for the war on the above dates and formed Davenport's 
Battalion in the Conf^'derate service. 



DAVENPORT'S BATTALION. 

General Dodge, at Corinth, reported October 21, 1863: "Davenport 
is at Fulton, not armed and only partly mounted. He has one company 
at Bay Springs, Captain Pardue's." 

Col. R. V. Richardson, commanding in Northeast Mississippi, reported 
October 28, 1863, that he had with him, besides his West Tennessee 
Brigade, three companies under Major Davenport and two companies 
under Major Street. 

The battalion was merged in the Sixth Regiment Cavalry, organized 
at Columbus by Colonel Harrison. 



DUNN'S BATTALION RANGERS. 

First Battalion State Troops. 

April 18, 1863, Gen. J. Z. George ordered by the Governor to organize 
the State cavalry in Chalmers' district, and order Captains Prince, Forrest 
and Dunn, with their commands, to report to him at Panola. Battalion 
assigned by Chalmers in May, to brigade of State troops under General 
George. 

Mississippi Rangers, organized 18 June, 1862. 

Captain — J. B. Dunn. 

Lieutenants— J. W. Knox, S. B. Hammond, W. L. D. White. 

Pettus Partisans, organized as independent cavalry 4 August. 1862. 

Captain — W. B. Prince. 

Lieutenants — S. C. Colbum, W. B. Helm, W. Graydon. 



FORREST'S BATTALION. 

"Sixth Battalion Mississippi State troops, Capt. A. H. Forrest, near 
Carrollton, 150 men." General Chalmers' report at time of Federal raid 
to Grenada, August, 1863. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 019 

HAM'S BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Sixteenth Battalion State troops. 

Majoi^—T. W. Ham. 

Surgeon — M. W. Bynum. 

Quartermaster — W. L. Williams. 

Adjutant — G. W. Bynum. 

Sergeants— A. W. Petty, T. W. Jones, W. Smith. 

Company A, Tishomingo Rangers, enlisted at Kossuth March lo, 1863. 

Captain — Benjamin H. Estes. 

First Lieutenant — Wm. A. Parish, 

Second Lieutenant — L. B. Estes. 

Third Lieutenant — John Hughes. 

Enrolled, 75. 

Company B, of Tishomingo County, enlisted at Booneville, January 2, 
1863. 

Captains— T. W. Ham, T. F. M. Payne. 

First Lieutenants — J. W. Donelson, G. A. Weathers. 

Second Lieutenants — J, D. Muse, L. Davis. 

Third Lieutenants — J. W. Curtice, P. C. Randolph. 

Enrolled, 67. 

Company C, enlisted at Booneville January 25, 1863. 

Captains — J. M. Yates, J. S. Bums. 

First Lieutenants — J. M. Mullins, J. S. Bums, J. W. Southerlin. 

Second Lieutenants — J. S. Burns, R. W. Adair. 

Third Lieutenants — J. W. Hennell, J. P. Yates. 

Enrolled, 57. 

Company D, enlisted at Booneville March 10, 1863. 
Captain— W. L. White. 

First Lieutenants — R. A. Sappington, J. M. Winters, killed at Atlanta. 
Second Lieutenant — W. A. Humphrey. 
. Third Lieutenant — F. M. Hughes. 
Enrolled, 77. 

Company E, enUsted at Grenada May 11, 1863. 

Captains— C. W. McNeil, E. C. Bourland. 

First Lieutenants — E. C. Bourland, T. R. Strickland. 

Second Lieutenant — G. J. Reeves. 

Third Lieutenant — P. B. Wood. 

Enrolled, 78. 

Company F, enlisted at Brown's Mill February 21, 1863. 

Captains— J. C. Gilstrap, M. W. Howard. 

First Lieutenants — E. F. Jackson, L. M. Coburn. 

Second Lieutenants — Elijah Edge, J. M. Barnes. 

Third Lieutenant — A. C. Tatum. 

Enrolled, 34. 



020 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company G, enlisted at Gimtown August 31, 1863. 

Captains— S. T. Mayes, I. N. Shilling. 

First Lieutenants— T. L. Williams, I. N. Shilling. 

Second Lieutenants — J. W. Rogers, J. P. O'Callaghan. 

Third Lieutenant — P. A. Green. 

Enrolled originally, 35; 63 in 1864. 

Company H, enlisted at Camp Creek August 22, 1863. 

Captain — J. T. Rees. 

First Lieutenants — J. B. Thomason, F. M. Ivey. 

Second Lieutenant — E. M. Williams. 

Third Lieutenant— R. J. Hill. 

Enrolled, 62. 

The above companies were organized under the call of Gen. J. E. 
Johnston, March 20, 1863. Gen. Daniel Ruggles, commanding at 
Columbus, reported "Weatherall's, Ham's, Carpenter's, Warren's and 
Cox's State Cavalry organizing." 

Captain Ham, with four companies, and Smith's State Regiment and 
Inge's Battalion, and the Second Tennessee, all under Colonel Barteau, 
of the latter regiment, fought the battle of Palo Alto, April 22, 1863, with 
Hatch's Iowa Cavalry Squadron, which had been detached from Grier- 
son's main column to strike at Macon. Barteau reported that Colonel 
Smith and Captain Ham acted gallantly, but he blamed their commands 
with allowing the enemy to escape. Hatch reported that he was being 
worsted in the fight, one of his companies cut off and nearly capture"d, 
and his whole command attacked from all sides, when he changed front 
to rear, and at close range opened with his artillery and broke the lines, 
cut his way out and recaptured his lost company. Grierson abandoned 
his purpose and turned north pursued by Barteau, with frequent skir- 
mishing and a fight of over two hours at Camp Creek, near Birmingham, 
where Hatch burned the bridge, stopping the pursuit. 

Major Ham's Battalion, entitled the First Battalion, Mississippi 
State Cavalry, was organized at Guntown, May 18, 1863, including 
Comi^anies A. B, C, D, E. Companies F, G, H, were added during 1863. 
"It appears that by an agreement understood by the President, the 
Governor and General Pemberton, the upper tier of counties and one-half 
of the second tier, being considered outside our military lines, were 
exempted from conscription, and State and partisan companies wore 
authorized to be raised and the conscripts in them were not to be inter- 
fered with." (S. D. Lee, report September, 1S63). The Governor stated 
that the men were mustered in for twelve months, but their rolls were 
never verified by Confederate States officers. Many of the men also 
attended to their home duties, and threats to conscript them, and the 
general uncertainty of their enlistment did not encourage them as efficient 
trooj)S. They were unpaid for months also. They were imder orders of 
the Confederate authorities and rationed and paid by the Confederate 
States. Generals Chalmers and Ferguson, commanding in the north of 
the State, were directed to assume command of them. 



asd 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 921 

Samuel J. Gholson, commissioned Major-General of State troops, 
April 1 8, 1863, took command of State troops in the northeast. 

General Ruggles was notified June 4, 1863, of the order by Governor 
Pettus that Smith's Regiment and Ham's Battalion should be turned 
over to the Confederate authorities, but only 35 men of Ham's Battalion 
could be assembled for that purpose. In October they were yet State 
troops under General Gholson's command, on the front line, but not under 
the orders of Colonel Richardson, the district commander in the north- 
east. September 7, the battalion drove back a Federal battalion through 
Jacinto. 

November 3, 1863, while General Chalmers made his second attack on 
Collierville, General Gholson organized a force of 270 men, including 
part of the battalion under Major Ham, which, under the command of 
Colonel Neely, left camp at Knight's Mill, and burned three trestles on 
the railroad. and the depot, barracks and stockade at Middleton. 

In February, 1863, they took part in Forrest's campaign against 
Sooy Smith (see Second Cavalry, Lowry). In March the strength was 
reported 320 aggregate. 

The battalion was re-enlisted early in 1864, in the State service, and 
transferred early in May to the Confederate States service. Soon after- 
ward it was increased to Ham's Regiment, which see. 



HAM'S REGIMEXT— CAVALRY, 

Sevknth Regiment, State Records. 

Colonel— T. W. Ham. killed at Atlanta. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — William P. Curlee. 
Major — George W. Bynum. 
Adjutant — George C. Summey. 
Surgeon — M. W. Bynum. 
Quartermaster — W. L. Williams. 
Chaplain — E. C. McElzea. 

This regiment was formed May 3, 1864, by adding two companies to 
Ham's Battalion of Cavalry, transferred to the service of the Confederate 
States about the same date (see Ham's Battalion). The regiment is 
entitled Seventh Regiment Cavalry in the State record of commissions, 
but does not appear to have gained that title in the Confederate organi- 
zation. It was known as Ham's Regiment. ■ i 

The companies added to the battalion' were : j 

Company I, enlisted September 30, 1863. j 

Captains — William P. Curlee. L. R. Burns. | 

First Lieutenant — L. R. Burris. j 

Second Lieutenant — P. H. Perkins. \ 

Third Lieutenant — R. M. Martin. j 



922 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company K, organized March i8, 1864, 
Captain— J. R. Wallis. 
First Lieutenant — G. H. Cunningham. 
Second Lieutenant — W. J. Page. 

The regiment, with Gholson's Brigade, participated in the attacks of 
July 6-7, 1864, by the forces under Gen. Wirt Adams, upon the command 
of General Slocum, between Jackson and CHnton, Miss. Three deter- 
mined attacks were made in the attempt to cut off Slocum 's retreat from 
Jackson, which he had occupied one day, advancing from Vicksburg. 
In Ham's Regiment Capt. W. L. White and Private J. N. Turner were 
killed and 18 wounded, including Lieut. W. J. Page, dangerously. 

July 25 the regiment was with the brigade in the lines of Atlanta, Ga., 
and on July 28, fighting west of Atlanta under Gen. S. D. Lee, dismounted, 
in Walthall's Division, they made a desperate charge upon the breast- 
works in the woods, and sustained h.ea.^ry losses. Colonel Ham was 
mortally wounded, and died July 30. Captain Estes, of Company A, 
and Lieutenant Winters, commanding Company D, were killed; Lieu- 
tenant Tatum and Captains Wallis and Burns, commanding companies, 
were wounded; Lieut. P. B. Wood, wounded and missing; the total 
casualties being 4 killed and ;^^ wounded, several of the latter missing. 

In December, 1864, General Gholson was severely wounded in com- 
mand of a part of his brigade at Egypt, fighting the last of Grierson's 
raids. While posted ten miles south of Columbus the brigade was con- 
solidated as Ashcraft's Regiment, under an order of General Chalmers, 
made February 18, 1865. This command, of which Curlee was Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, was assigned to Armstrong's Brigade, which made a 
gallant fight against odds, in the works at Selm.a, Ala., April 2, 1865, 
Here a considerable number were killed, wounded or captured. General 
Long, whose division made the assault, reported on his side, 42 killed, 
270 wounded. 

The officers and men were finally paroled in May, 1865, under the 
capitulation of Lieut. -Gen. Richard Taylor, May 4. (Also see Second 
Cavalry, Lowry; Third Cavalry, McGuirk; Ashcraft's consolidated 
Regiment). 

HARRIS' BATTALION. 

Second Battalion, State Troops. 

Major — Thomas W. Harris. 
Adjutant — James Moore. 
Quartermaster — Carroll Ferguson. 
Surgeon — John E. Turner. 

Company A, originally Pontotoc Minute Men, organized S September, 
1862; re-enlisted 16 September, 1863. 

Captains — John T. Weatherall, died December 10, 1863; Armistead 
B. Cole. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 923 

First Lieutenants— Armistead B. Cole; Silas H. Wood, Samuel B. 
Bigham. . 

Second Lieutenants — Silas H. Wood, S. B. Bigham, N. A. Lankford. 
Third Lieutenants — Samuel B. Bigham, N. A. Lankford, J. A. Davis. 
Enrolled, 78. See Pontotoc Dragoons, First Cavalry. 

Company B, Wood's Company, of Pontotoc, organized as Minute 
Men, August 9, 1862; enlisted at Pontotoc 16 December, 1863; re-enlisted 
January 26, 1864. 

Captain — Silas H. Wood. 

First Lieutenant — Wm. D. Graves. 

Second Lieutenant — L. P. McCord. 

Third Lieutenant — Scott Turner. 

Enrolled, 69. 

Company C, enlisted January 23, 1864, in Monroe County. 

Captain — James Moore. 

First Lieutenant — J. T. Dilworth. 

Second Lieutenant — J. R, Gillelyn. 

Third Lieutenant — W. J. Martin. 

Enrolled, 66. 

Company C, organized 1863; reorganized 14 April, 1864. 

Captains — J. P. Grace, Thomas J. Rye. 

First Lieutenant — S. W. Weatherall. i 

Second Lieutenant — G. T. Wilsford. 

Third Lieutenant — J. D. Malone'. 

This battalion was first organized for State service, in the fall of 1863' 
in Northeast Mississippi, Second Battalion State Cavalry, and reorgan- i 

ized under the direction of General Gholson and transferred to the Con- 
federate States service May i, 1864. Aggregate, March, 1864, 177. 

General Forrest, in May, sent Major Harris to confer with Gen. S. D. 
Lee. "Major Harris is anxious to fill up his battalion to a regiment, and 
has several companies on their way to him." The battalion was con- ■ 

solidated in June with Ashcraft's Battalion, to form Ashcraft's Regiment, 
with Harris as Lieutenant-Colonel. (See Ashcraft's Regiment and 
Ashcraft's consolidated Regiment). j 



JOHNSON'S CAVALRY COMPANY. 

With General Ruggles, commanding First Military District, head- 
quarters Columbus, April, 1863. Participated in the action of Genera^ 
Chalmers' command with Bryant's Federal command on the Cold water* 
in March. 



924 _ MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

MATTHEWS' BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Part of General Chalmers' command, headquarters Panola, in April, 
1863. Participated in the action on the Coldwater, with Bryant's 
Infantry, in March. 

OUTLAW'S BATTALION— PARTISAN RANGERS. . 

Major — Drew A. Outlaw. 
No information. 



PARTISAN RANGERS. 

Capt. G. E. Tola's company. * 

Capt. J. M. Poitevent's company. 

Only Mississippi partisan organization that had forwarded rolls to 
Secretary of War, September 12, 1862. 



PERRIN'S BATTiVLION. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — R. O. Perrin. 
Major— A. C. Reid. 

See Eleventh Regiment. The battalion was composed of the com- 
panies of Captains Perrin, J. R. Allen, M. A. Metts, G. M. Mosley, Mont- 
gomery, J. H. Rayburn, Thomas B. Foard, C. M. Thomas and W. L. 
Walker. 

The Adjutant-General's list of July 7, 1863, shows the following 
State ' Cavalry on duty at Jackson: Perrin 's company, total 45; J. R. 
Allen's company, total 57; Lieut. G. M. Moseley's company, total 28; 
Mett's company, total 42. This was just before Sherman's siege. 



YAZOO BATTALION. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — Charles F. Hamer, commissioned June 7, 1862, 
Company A, Captain Walter L. Johnson, of Yazoo County. 
Company B, Captain Robert H. Sanders, of Yazoo County. 



SAUNDERS' BATTALION. 

Major — B. F. Saunders. 

Company A, of Chickasaw County. 

Captain — L. Hill, killed at Thompson's Station, Tenn. 

Lieutenants — John Brown, Sadler. 

Company B. 

Captain — B. F. Saunders. 



¥M 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 925 

Company C. 

Captain — Paralus Mann. 

See Inge's Twelfth Battalion. 

General Forrest ordered Capt. B. F. Saunders, with his company of 
scouts, operating in the Mississippi bottom, to join Rucker's Brigade, 
May 24, 1864, Chalmers, at Water Valley, ordered to leave Forrest's 
and Saunders' companies at Panola in observation of enemy, as Chalmers 
moved to Grenada. In March General Chalmers relieved Capt. Saunders 
of command, but the order was suspended by General Forrest and 
Saunders ordered to report to Col. J. A. Forrest at Hernando. It was 
hoped that Saunders' and Mitchell's old companies could be filled and 
used to break up the cotton trade with Memphis and arrest deserters. 

March i6, 1865, at Columbus, Miss., Saunders' company was assigned 
as Company B, Capt. B. F, Saunders commanding, to a consolidated 
regiment formed from Chalmers' Battalion and part of Fifth Regiment 
Cavalry, which see. 



STREET'S BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Major — Solomon G. Street. 

"Merged into Stewart's Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry." (Official 
Records List). 

See Second Regiment Cavalry, Minute Men and Gholson's Brigade. 



926 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 



1863-6?. 



STATE TROOPS AND RESERVES. 
Mainly Troops op 1864. 

In August, 1864, Governor Clark was authorized to call out every 
ablebodied man in the State to repel invasion, and all capable of bearing 
arms were called to assemble at Grenada, Okolona or Macon. In August 
also, the Legislature authorized General Forrest to order on military- 
duty for thirty days boys and men between the ages of 16 and 55 years. 

Col. J. J. Pettus, commissioned August 8, 1S64, was put in command 
of rendezvous at Grenada, with P. S. Layton as his Adjutant. Col. 
John M. Simonton, commissioned August 13, was assigned to command 
of the rendezvous at Okolona. Col. Jeptha V. Harris, commissioned 
August 26, was in command at Macon. There was also a rendezvous at 
Brandon, under Colonel Thornton. Col. O. J. E. Stewart commanded 
District No. 5. 

FIRST REGIMENT— INFANTRY. 

Organized August 24, 1864. 
Colonel — WilHam S. Patton. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — Samuel M. Meek. 
Major— W. D. Outlaw. 
Assistant Surgeon — J. G. Carroll. 
Chaplain— P. P. Neely. 

Adjutants — A. J. Gillespie, Phil. M. Jenkins. 
Quartermaster — J. D. Tolson. 

Company A. 

Captain — A. J. Halbert. 

Lieutenants — L, Jones, E. Redus, W. S. Bray. 

Enrolled, 23. 

Company B. 

Captain— W. G. Grace. 

Lieutenants — Daniel Maggard, W. L. Mayfield, E. W.'Lacy. 

Company C. - . - 

Captain — Jesse Blythe. 

Lieutenants — F. M. Shields, W. B. Augustus, J. W. Messengall. 

Company D, enlisted at Columbus 18 August, 1864. 
Captains — Samuel M. ^leek, elected Lieutenant-Colonel at Macon 
Miss., 24 August, 1864; Collins C. Homsby. 

Lieutenants — Harrison Hale, Thomas J. Gibson, James W. Irion. 
Enrolled, 126. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 927 

Company E, Kemper Deer]^Hunters, enlisted at Macon 18 August, 
1864, mainly from Kemper County. 
Captain — Edmond Newell. 

Lieutenants — John C. Gilbert, Duncan D. Briggs, William B. Pettus. 
Enrolled, 64. 

Company F, mainly from Noxubee County, enlisted at Macon 19 
August, 1864. 

Captain — Abram Greer. 
Lieutenant — George L. Haynes. 
Enrolled, 41. 

Company G, of Lowndes County, enlisted at Artesia 18 August, 1864' 
Captain — Cornelius Hardy. 

Lieutenants — Richard C. Sanderson, Herbert E. Hardy, Addison W. 
Butler. 

Enrolled, 66. 

Company H. 

Captain — S. W. Chapman. 

Lieutenants— T. S. Parker, M. B. Knight, C. A. Stovall. 

Company I, of Winston, Leake and Neshoba, enlisted at Macon 22 
August, 1864. 

Captain — Thomas Houston. 

Lieutenants — G. B. Shinn, M. C. Gage, J. Watkins. 

Enrolled, 72. 

Company K. 

Captain — S. H. Shannon. 

Lieutenants— W. W. Hale, Wright Pifford, S. S. Williams. 



SECOND REGIMENT— INFANTRY. 

Organized September 2, 1864, for thirty days. 
Colonel — Greene C. Chandler. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — William L. Cole. 
Major — William T. Powe. 
Quartermaster — J. M. Bradley. 
Adjutant — D. C. Chamberlain. 
Chaplain — R. J. Jones. 

Company A, enlisted at Enterprise and Macon 22 August, 1864. 
Captain— John W. C. O'Ferrall. 

Lieutenants— C. S. Jackson, J. W. Griffin, P. S. Delamar. 
Enrolled, 72. 

Company B, enlisted in Wayne County mainly, 23 August, 1864. 
Captain — J. L. Pickens. 

Lieutenants — John McKay, B. T. Harris, H. C. Chapman. 
Enrolled, 90. 



928 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company C, enlisted_"at Macon 22 August, 1864. 
Captain — William Kellis. 
First Lieutenant — S. G. Clay. 
Enrolled, 50. 

Company D, enlisted at Pauldint^ 23 August, 1864. 
Captain — James A. Chapman. 

Lieutenants — W. F. Byrd, A. J. Hyde, B. J. Morrison. 
Enrolled, 109. 

Company E, enlisted in Jasper County 23 August, 1864. 
Captain — J. U. McCormick. 

Lieutenants— E. M. Ball, C. C. Reed, W. Brain. 
Enrolled, 76. 

Company F, enlisted in Clarke County 22 August, 1864. 
Captain — J. W. Lankford. ' ■■"■ 

First Lieutenant — L. A. Kidd. - • ' 

Enrolled, 36. 

Company G, enlisted at Starkville 23 August, 1864. 

Captain — S. D. Sessions. 

Lieutenants — Thomas Watt, William E. Saunders, M. E. Owens. 

Enrolled, 85. 

Company H, enlisted at Macon 22 August, 1864. 
Captain — John H. Cochrane. 

Lieutenants — John Brown, G. B. W^hite, W. C. Dobbs. 
Enrolled, 70. 

Company I, enlisted at Ruckersville 20 August, 1864. 
Captain — P. H. Singleton. 

Lieutenants— J. M. Hancock, R. K. Hill, G. T. Cotton. 
Enrolled, 72. 

Company K, enlisted at Monroe City 22 August, 1864. 
Captain — M. B. Steward. 

Lieutenants — W. W. Troup, S. W. Seely, J. L Crosby. 
Enrolled, 59. 

Company L, enlisted at Jasper City 23 August, 1864. 

Captain — M. Vaughn. 

First Lieutenant — Asa Loftin. 

Enrolled, 23. 

Company M, enlisted at Oktibbeha 29 August, 1864. 

Captain — J. P. East. 

First Lieutenant — H. Quinn. 

Enrolled, 26. 

Company O, enlisted in Jones County 12 September, 1S64. 

Captain — R. C. W^indham. 

First Lieutenant — James By num. 

Enrolled, 23. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 929 

CHANDLER'S REGIMENT. 

General Maury, commanding the department, asked Governor Clark, 
at Meridian, September 5, 1864, to send Chandler's Regiment to Bucatunna 
to protect the railroad. The regiment was posted accordingly, under the 
orders of General Maury. 



THIRD REGIMENT— INFANTRY. 

Colonel — ^James Summerville. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — William Buckner. 
Major — ^T. C. Harris. 
Adjutant — A. M. Harlow. 

Cempany A. 

Captain-^J. A. Hale. 

Lieutenants — ^J. C. Kittrell, M. W. Callahan, R. W. Smith. 

Company B. 

Captain — G. G. Gordin. 

Lieutenants— J. E. Phillips, T. C. Everitt, O. J. Moore. 

Company C. 

Captain — ^J. L. Milton. 

Lieutenants — ^J. C. Stokes, R. Coffman, D. L. Corley. 

Company D. 

Captain — ^J. C. Hayman 

Lieutenants — ^J. W. Slater, M. S. Sparks, A. C. Hale. 

Company E. 

Captain — T. L. Stevens. 

Lieutenants — ^J. Dean, A. M. Harlow^, J. N. Bozett. 

Company F. 

Captain — D, M. McLeod. 

Lieutenants — J. C. McCarthy, W. C. Irby, Thomas S. Johnson. 

Company G. 

Captain — J. C. Riley. 

Lieutenants — R. Bowie, C. G. Harris, E. F. Parkerson. 

Company H. 

Captain — J. Bankhead. 

Lieutenants — ^J. Hubbard, R. C. Higginbotham, V. Taylor. 

Company I. 

Captain— E. B. Pe>Tues. 

Lieutenants — C. H. Gray, N. D. Porter, \V. S. Wilson. 

Company K. 

Captain — J. Hill. 

Lieutenants— H. F. Day, A. P. Harris, T. B. J. Lusk. 







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ivIap of Mississippi 

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930 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

FIRST BATTALION— INFANTRY. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — J. Y. Harper. 
Major — N. H. Bradley. 

Formed from eight companies of infantry that reported at Brandon 
and were enlisted there August 20-31, 1864. 

Company A. 

Captain — ^James JIarshall. 

Lieutenants — G. F. Spann, R. S. Taylor, J. L. Vinson. 

Enrolled, 79. 

Company B. 

Captain — B. F. Sutton. 

Lieutenants — ^James A. Watford, J. M. Miller, Thomas R. Ford. 

Enrolled, 67. 

Company C. 

Captain — ^Thomas Harris. 

Lieutenants — J. W. Bailey, G. W. Bamer, J. W. Turner. 

Enrolled, 78. 

Company D. 

Captain^— Joseph Eakins. 

Lieutenants — J. A. Everitt, J. C. McKee, B. Griffin. 

Enrolled, 84. 

Company E. 

Captain — D. W. Hamilton. 

Lieutenants — R. A. Graham, A. B. W odham, A. G. Pace. 

Enrolled, 73. 

Company F. 

Captain— T, D. Paddleford. 
Lieutenants — ^J. W. Owens, J. M. Futch. 
Enrolled, 77. 

Company G. 

Captain — J. J. Lamar. 

Lieutenants — Henry Collier, D. S. McDonald, Asher Jackson. 

Enrolled, 59. 

Company H. 

Captain — Robert Noblin. 

Lieutenants — W. G. Barnes, T. H. Batte, M. J. Howard. 

The above rolls cover the period August-September, 1S64, when the 
battalion was encamped at Brandon. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 931 



FIRST REGIMENT— CAVALRY, STATE TROOPS. 

Colonel— H. W. Foote, July 6, 1864. 
Lieutenant-Colonel — W. P. Malone, August 23, 1864. 
Major — George M. Moseley, August 23, 1864. 
Quartermaster — Daniel Mcintosh. 

Company A, enlisted at Macon 11 July, 1864, 

Captain — W. M. Connor. 

Lieutenants — ^A. J. Boswell, J. A. Burch, D. G. Dismukes. 

Enrolled, 58. 

Company B. 

Captain — ^John Kennedy. 

Lieutenants — D. M. Wilson, J. C. Doss, A. A. Hood. 

Company C. 

Captain — J. R. Johnson. 

Lieutenants — W. W. Eddins, John Gilmer, H. S. Potts. 

Company D. 

Captain— J. W. Gully. 

Lieutenants — L. K. Floyd, H. D. White, R. J. Edmunds. 

Company E. 

Captain — John Gilmer. 

Lieutenant — H. S. Potts. 

Company F. 

Captain — C. C. Allen. 

Lieutenants — ^J. E. Watkins, J. M. Graham, S. B. Woodruff. 

Company G. 

Captain — J. C. Holmes. 

Lieutenant — Hugh McQuin. 

Company H. 

Captain — ^James Rile3\ 

Lieutenants — S. M. Stribling, D. M. Bockstrvim. 

Company I. 

Captain — R. L. Cannon. 

Lieutenants — H, S. Holloman, D. Robertson, A. J. Powell. 

Company K. 

Captain — J. W. Harden. 

Lieutenant — O. Y. Neely. 

Company L. 

Captain — H. H. Dunn. 

Lieutenants — R. O. Wier, N. M. Gooch, A. P. Bush. 



932 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

SECOND RKGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Organized 13 September, 1864. 
Colonel— J. L. J. Hill. 
Lieutenant-Cclonel — Merriman Pounds. 
Major— M. B. Parks. 
Adjutant — Milton E. Bacon. 
Quartermaster — ^John T. Dyke. 
Chaplain — O. F. Rogers. 
Surgeon — B. L. Hatch. 

No rolls or lists on file. This regiment was on duty at Corinth. 
Chalmers ■uTote, September 28, it had been withdrawn without his 
knowledge. 



THIRD REGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Colonel— W. K. Easterling. 

Company A, enlisted July 4, 1864. 

Captains — W. K. Easterling, promoted Colonel; A. Speer. 

First Lieutenant — A. Speer. 

Second Lieutenant — W. S. Myers. 

Third Lieutenant — Richard Cooper. 

Enrolled, 104. 

Company B, enlisted July, 1864. 
Captain — William Thames. - -—- 

First Lieutenant — ^J. C. McElroy. 
Second Lieutenant — William Graham. 
Third Lieutenant — ^James A. Ware. 
Enrolled, 77. 

Company C, enlisted 20 July, 1864, at Raymond. 

Captain— H. V. Barr. 

First Lieutenant — A. Lacy. 

Second Lieutenant — J. G. Austin. 

Third Lieutenant — W. L. Hemphill. 

Enrolled, 63. 

Company D, enlisted at Forest 16 July, 1864. 

Captain — ^James C. Harper. 

Lieutenants — ^J. H. Beeman, Wyatt Wooten. H. W. Copeland. 

Enrolled, 53. 

Company E, enlisted at Gallatin July 6, 1864, 

Captain — Vviley J. Butler. 

Lieutenants — Samuel H. Aby, H. G. L. Brown, A, G. Carter. 

Enrolled, 94. 

Company F. 

Captain — Benjamin F. Martin. 



.[■ • ^>f 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 033 

Lieutenants — Orville L. Johnson, John Thompson, Peter L. Trawick. 
Enrolled, 79. 

Company G, enlisted at Canton 17 August, 1864. 

Captain — William E. Haneld. 

Lieutenants — William C. Love, W. M. C. Jones, A. H. Dinkins. 

Enrolled, 55. 

Company H, enlisted at Brandon 27 August, 1864. 
Captain — H. W." Pierce. 

Lieutenants — M. J. Zunts, Samuel Milton, F. M. Baldwin. 
Enrolled, 53. 

Company I, enlisted at Hillsboro and Morton 18 August, 1864. 

Captain — ^John R. Owen. 

Lieutenants — T. F. Pettus, W. M. Thornton. . 

Enrolled, 41. i 

Company K, enlisted at Brandon 29 August, 1864. - ; 

Captain — William Vinzant. 

Lieutenants — W. H. Quarles, commanding; T. J. Feazell, Jesse Craft. 
Enrolled, 114. 

The designation of this regiment appears to have changed from First 
to Third Cavalry. The regiment was organized by the election of Colonel 
Easterling August 30, 1864, at Brandon. : 



. FOURTH REGIMENT— CAVALRY. 

Organized September 6, 1864. 
Colonel— E. S. Fisher. 
Lieut en ant -Colonel — A. S. Pass. 
Major — P. S. Alston. 

Company A. 

Captain — A. Barr. 

Lieutenants— H. T. McLurty, A. G. Hallam, W. C. Grim. 

Company B. 

Captain — A. H. Booth. 

Lieutenants— J. W. Wood, N. M. Crenshaw, T. B. Bozwell. 

Company C. 

Captain — R. C. Wynn. 

Lieutenants — W. M. Rings, R. P. Lake, J. C. James. 

Company D. 

Captain — D. W. Dyer. 

Lieutenants— D. F. Floyd, J. J. Wright, J. L. Walton. 

Company E. 

Captain — A. M. Davis. 

Lieutenants — F. L. James, L. M. Nash, M, L. Tanner. 



934 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Company F. 

Captain — H. H. Smith. 

Lieutenants— F. W. Goff, J. M. Boyd, H. W. Hill.. 

Company G. 

Captain — J. M. Wilson. 

Lieutenants — S. T. Smurr, W. O. Benford, E. B. Stanbach. 

Company H. 

Captain — W. S. Hudson. 

Lieutenants — S. P. Brantly, J. Thedford, A. W. Breer. 

Company I. 

Captain — T. J. N. Bridges. 

Lieutenants — H. T. St. Clair, I. L. Vizier, T. J. Delasight. 

Company K. 

Captain — T. K. McCord. 

Lieutenants — B. Fuller, E. D. Stephens, W. S. Embry. 

Company L. 

Captain — C. A. Lewers. 

Lieutenants — ^J. M. Lamar, James Enochs, M. Tankersly. 



FIRST BATTALION— CAVALRY. 
Major — ^John E. McNair. 
Company A. 
Captain — N. W. Lee. 

Lieutenants — ^T. R. Gowan, G. B. Weathersly, J. P. Brown. 
Enrolled, 95. 

Company B. 

Captains — ^John E. McNair, elected Major; John McRaney. 

Lieutenants — ^John McRaney, H. A. McLeod,.C. M. Edmondson, W. 
L. Strahan. 

Enrolled, 99. 

Company C. 

Captain — Robert D. Lanier. 

Lieutenants — ^James E. Harper, James L. Tynes, James M. Butler. 

Enrolled, 74. 

Company D. 

Captain — George J. Mortimer. 

Lieutenants — O. Newton, J. M. Davis, Henry Hall. 

Enrolled, 82. 

Company E. 

Captain— A. E. McClellan. 

Lieutenants — J. J. Wall, J. F. Burnett, A. J. Morrison. 

Enrolled, 43. 

The first four companies were enlisted at Brandon August 30 to Sep" 
tember i, and Captain McNair elected Captain of the battalion September 
2, after which the last company joined, September 7. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. * 935 

THIRD BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Third Battalion State Cavalry, composed of four companies, was re- 
ported 76 present; total, 225, station near Dry Grove, October 29, 1864, 
Capt. D. G. Cooper commanding. 



PETTUS' BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Major — ^J. J. Pettus. 

Company A, of Panola County. 
Captain — J. R. Dickens. 
First Lieutenant — ^J. D. Farley. 
Second Lieutenant — ^J. Bishop. 
Third Lieutenant — ^James Cox. 

Company B, of De Soto County. 
Captain — William Ruffin. 
First Lieutenant — ^J. G. Jackson. 
Second Lieutenant — S. C. Davis. 
Third Lieutenant — D. H. Sanders, Jr. 

Company C. ' - 

Captain — V. A. Merriwether. 

First Lieutenant — S. C. Russworm. 

Second Lieutenant — W. B. Wright. 

Third Lieutenant — W. P. Eason. 

Company D. 

Captain — W. B. Locke. 

First Lieutenant — A. York. 

Second Lieutenant — ^J. G. Bamett. 

Third Lieutenant — G. R. Bonds. 

Major Pettus was commissioned 7 September, 1864. This was a 
battalion of State troops. 

UNATTACHED. 
Cavalry company. 
Captain — W. A. J. Boon, organized August 28, 1864. 

Gavin's Company. 

Captain — H. H. Gavin, organized 29 August, 1864. 

Grace's Company. 

Captain — W. G. Grace, organized September 14, 1864; discharged 
March 15, 1865. 

Shield's Company. 

Captain — F. M. Shields, organized September 10, 1864; discharged 
March 15, 1865. 



936 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Kelly's Company. 

Captain — ^John Kelly, organized October lo, 1864; discharged March 
15. 1865. 

Caperton's Company. 

Captain — W. G. Caperton, organized December 15, 1864; discharged 
March 15, 1865. 

Doss' Company. 

Captain — C. M. Doss, organized September 13, 1864; discharged 
March 15, 1865. 



RESERVES. 



FIRST REGIMENT RESERVES. 

Colonel — ^Jules C. Denis. 

Lieutenant -Colonel — D. W. Metts. 
^ Major — ^J. F. Meston. 

Gen. W. L. Brandon, commanding at Enterprise, reported August i4» 
1864, that he had in camp six companies of Dennis' Battalion, which 
would be ready to take the field August 18. He had sent one company of 
this cavalry to Jones County, a company of infantry to Jackson County, 
and^one other company of infantry was doing guard duty at Enterprise. 
Maury to Chalmers: "Dennis' Battalion of reserves left Enterprise 
1 8th." Major Dennis was commandant of conscripts. The regiment 
was supposed to be of men under 18 and over 45 years of age. 

Dennis' command was reported on the Coldwater, November 16. 

November 20 report: First Mississippi Cavalry Reserves, Second 
Mississippi Cavalry Battalion Reserves, Third Mississippi Cavalry Bat- 
talion Reserves, Col. Jules C. Denis commanding, brigaded with Moor- 
man's Battalion, under Col. Dennis. 

Maj.-Gen. W. T. Martin, commanding in Northwest Mississippi, 
ordered all of Dennis' command to Holly Springs, Decem.ber 23, on account 
of Grierson's raid, supposed to be toward Corinth. When Grierson's 
purpose was discovered, the destruction of the Mobile and Ohio, Denis 
was ordered in pursuit. 

GAMBLIN'S CAVALRY, STATE TROOPS. 

Company enlisted at Dawe's Store, Kemper County, 30 April, 1864. 
Captain — E. D. Gamblin. 
First Lieutenant — A. C. Gamblin. 
Second Lieutenant — J. W, McCraw. 
Third Lieutenant — C. L. Smith. 
Enrolled, 88. 

Gamblin 's Cavalry Battalion, Capt. E. D. Gamblin, listed in Mabry's 
Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry, September 30, 1864. 



MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 937 



MORPHIS' SCOUTS. 

July i8, 1864, General Forrest ordered Captain Morphis, commanding 
scouts, to report to Forrest's Regiment, Chalmers' Division. 



PEYTON'S BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Major — E. A. Peyton. 
Adjutant— A. B. Watts. 

Company A, enlisted at Brookhaven April 26, 1864. 

Captain — J. W. Pierce. 

First Lieutenant — C. O. Nelson. 

Second Lieutenant — F. M. Pierce. 

Third Lieutenant — L. G. Sessions. 

Roll, 63. 

Company, of Rankin County, enlisted at Brandon 15 January, 1864. 

Captain — D. G. Cooper. 

First Lieutenant — ^W. J. Kersh. 

Second Lieutenant — R. H. Cooper. 

Third Lieutenant — D. S. Myers. 

Enrolled, 56; all but two exempt by age. "This company was raised 
by Captain Cooper and with three others formed a battalion of four 
companies, commanded by Major D. G. Cooper, for the last year and 
a half of the war for Southern independence. When Captain Cooper 
was promoted, Lieut. R. H. Cooper succeeded to command of this company 
(A), Third Mississippi Battalion, on duty on the Big Black. Major 
Cooper entered the service as a private in Bob Smith's company from 
Jackson and went to Florida, obtained authority to raise a company, 
joined the Sixth Regiment, served two years, was appointed Adjutant- 
General on staff of General Lovell, commanding post at Brandon, and 
when relieved raised this company and was put in command of Third 
Mississippi Battalion." (Note on roll). Also noted on roll, "was for- 
merly commanded by Peyton, latterly by Cooper." 

Little's Company, enlisted at Bahala January-April, 1864. 

Captain — Francis M. Little. 

First Lieutenant — W. J. P. Patterson. 

Second Lieutenant — A. J. Spikes. 

Third Lieutenant — H. E. Dunbar. 

Enrolled, 64. 

W. B. Yerger's Company, enlisted at Bahala 5 April, 1864, by Major 
Poyton. 

Captain— W. B. Yerger. 

Lieutenants— R. J. Stillman, W. W. Ward, J, W. Dunbar. 

Enrolled, 67. 



938 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

August I, 1864, Cavalry Battalion State troops, Maj. E. A. Peyton, 
attached to Wood's Brigade, Wirt Adams' Cavalry. Also called Mis- 
sissippi Reserves. 

They were enlisted for two years of the war at dates above given. 
Discharged March 15, 1865. 



STUBB'S BATTALION— CAVALRY. 

Lieutenant-Colonel — George W. Stubbs. 

Major — George W, Stubbs, May 16, 1864; promoted 17 November, 
1864. 

Quartermaster — William Norwood. 
Assistant Surgeon — W. D. Bragg. 

Company A, organized 12 April, 1864. 
Captain — J. C. Barnes. 
First Lieutenant — G. W. Walker. 
Second Lieutenant — Owen Weathersby. 
Third Lieutenant — J. W. Goodwin. 

Company B, organized 6 April, 1864. 
Captain — W.J.Eaton. 
First Lieutenant — D. J. McLeod. 
Second Lieutenant — A. S. Davis. 
Third Lieutenant — R. Mclnnis. 

Company C, organized 16 April, 1864. 
Captain — N. B. Barnes. 
First Lieutenant — M. M. Lott. 
Second Lieutenant — G. W. Lott. 
Third Lieutenant — Daniel Pierce. 

Company D, organized 16 February, 1864. 

Captain — James E. Griffith. 

First Lieutenant — N. W. Lambeth. 

This battalion of State Cavalry, Reserves, was listed in August, and 
later, 1864, Maj. George W. Stubbs commanding, with Wood's Brigade. 
Wirt Adams' Caval^\^ district north of Homxochitto. The battalion 
participated in the battle of Griffith's (Mabry's) Brigade with Osband's 
expedition, December i, 1864, at Concord Church, near Yazoo City. 
Discharged March 15, 1865. 

Montgomery's Scouts, enlisted in Hinds County November i, 1864. 
Captain — W. A. Montgomery. 

Lieutenants— E. C. ]^^ontgomer>^ W. H. Irish, J. H. Ellis. 
Total roll 83, including 3 killed; roll 31 January, 1865. 

Took position on line of Big Black November 5, 1864. Twenty-five 
of the company in skirmish near Yazoo City, December i, had three 



I4ILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. • 939 

wounded, captured Lieutenant Woodward and i6 men, Second Wis- 
consin Cavalry. In Januaiy ordered to scout around Natchez, being 
relieved on the Big Black line by Captain Wilkinson, Moorman's Bat- 
talion. 

September 5 General Maury asked Governor Clark, at Meridian, to 
send Montgomery's company of unattached cavalry as scouts with 
Chandler's Regiment to Bucatunna, to guard the railroad. 

Colonel Griffith, commanding Mabry's Brigade, reported that Brad- 
ford's scouts and the independent company of scouts under Capt. Will 
Montgomery, fought on his skirmish line in the battle of Concord Church, 
near Yazoo City, December i, 1864, and he awarded them "the highest 
praise." 

Discharged from service March 13, 1865. 



MONTGOMERY'S BATTALION. 

Second Battalion, State Cavalry. ■ 

Major — W. E. Montgomery, June 29, 1864. 
Adjutant— A. K. Stafford. 

Rebel Troop, enlisted 17 February, 1864, in Choctaw and Winston 
Counties mainly. 

Captain — S. B. Hammond. 
First Lieutenant — W. W. Taylor. 
Second Lieutenant — D. L. Roach. 
Enrolled 89. 

Cameron's Company. 
Lieutenant — John R. Cameron. 

Hemdon Rangers, enlisted in Bolivar County, 27 October 1862, as 
an independent company of Partisan Rangers; re-enlisted 28 May, 1864. 
Captains — D. C. Hemdon, W. E. Montgomer>% Daniel S. Cameron. 
First Lieutenants — W. E. Montgomery, J. A. Stafford, D. S. Cameron. \ 

Second Lieutenants — J. J. Aycock, Joseph Seller, T. L. Lewis. 
Third Lieutenants — J. W. Lawler, J. A. Stafford. 
Roll of June, 1863, 97 aggregate. 

A portion of the company skirmished with a Federal party at the 
home of Col. F. A. Montgomery, in Bolivar County, near the river, 
February 30, 1863. 

Company D, Yazoo Rangers, enhsted at Yazoo City, April 16, 1862, 
and recruited in August by Second Lieutenant Gartley. 

Captains— H. C. Tyler, Wm. F. Gartley. 

First Lieutenants — W. S, Epperson, W. F. Gartley. promoted Captain 
October, 1862; H. M. Thompson. 

Second Lieutenants— H. M. Thompson, W. F. Gartley, P. B. Cook. 



940 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. « 

Third Lieutenants — C. W. Boyd, N. H. Ingram. 
First Sergeant — Samuel Harrison. 
Total roll, 65. 

This company was attached to General Hebert's Brigade, January 
and March, 1863. 

Reorganized i June, 1864, assigned to Montgomery's Battalion, 
scouts on Mississippi River, battalion ordered to report to Gen. Wirt 
Adams in August, 1864. 

(Gartley's company of independent scouts, raised in Yazoo County, 
went to Arkansas and Missouri in 1861, served with General Price at 
Springfield, Mo., and in the battle of Elkhom, and returned to Mississippi 
with VanDom — Robert Bowman). 



MONTGOMERY'S BATTALION. 

This battalion of State Cavalry, four companies, under the command 
of Major Montgomery, served as scouts along the Mississippi River in 
1864, until ordered in August to report to Gen. Wirt Adams, whose com- 
mand they joined at Livingston. September 30, Montgomery's Battalion 
State Cavalry, Reserves, attached to Colonel Wood's Brigade, Wirt 
Adams' command, district north of Homochitto. 



FIFTH REGIMENT, FOURTH BRIGADE, STATE MILITIA. 

Two hundred rank and file petitioned President Davis March, 1864, 
stating they were not liable to conscription, had been in service eight 
months, and asked to be allowed to return home to plant crops. Presi- 
dent advised Governor Pettus to grant the request, imless they were 
absolutely needed. 

VARIOUS COMPANIES, STATE TROOPS. 

Henley's Invincibles, enlisted at Biloxi, 5 July, 1861. 

Captain — John L. Henley. 

EnHsted men, 35. On duty 26 days in July, i86i. This company 
served on board the Confederate steamer "Oregon," in Mississippi 
Sound. 

Lexington Guards, independent company, of Holmes County, organ- 
ized 21 April, 1 86 1. 

Captain — L. R. Page. 

Lieutenants — Arthur Doyle, George M. Cole, Cass Oltenburg. 

Pope Guards, independent company, of Panola County, organized 
«3 April, 1862. 

Captain — James J. Houston. 

Lieutenants — Frank M. Pugh, William H. Wray, William J. Brandon. 



i^m 






MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. * 941 

Hemdon Rangers, Lieut. Montgomery; Mississippi Rangers, Capt. 
W. B. Peery; Gholson Guards, Capt. T. C. Bookter, and companies of 
Capts. J. T. Weatherall, J. A. Hartin, J. H. Buford, B. F. Saunders and 
Hall (also Captains Thames, disbanded; and Red, gone into Confederate 
service), mentioned as unattached companies in Adjutant-General's 
report of November, 1863, "Captains Weatherall's, Peery 's and Herden's 
unattached companies; Perrin's Battalion, and Hartin 's, Red's, Hall's, 
Saunder's and Bookter's companies, organized under a call of Gen. J. E. 
Johnston, and now in service, are not to be interfered with, and the 
conscripts now in them, by direction of the President, are to remain till 
the term of service of these troops are expired * * * are under the 
orders of the Confederate authorities * * * Paid and rationed by I 

the Confederate States." (Orders of Gen. S. D. Lee, September, 1863. 
Most of these companies will be found included in the regiments under 
the head of Minute Men and Gholson 's Brigade. J 

Attala County Cavalry, organized 8 August, 1863; six months. _| 

Captain — J. H. Buford. | 

Lieutenants — J. B. Talor, James Meigs, T. W. Buford. I 

Enrolled, 48. - | 

Dixie Rangers, of Banner, organized 20 June, 1863. j 

Captain — J. A. Hartin. j 

Lieutenants — James C. Kennedy, D. A, Tyre, W. H. Thornton. ; 

Yalobusha Rangers, organized as independent company 11 April, 
1863. 

Captain— A. B. Fly. 

Lieutenants — G. Q. Martin, Jesse Pipkin, R. J. Lacy. 

Senatobia Rangers, of De Soto County, organized as independent 
State cavalry 28 July, 1862. 

Captain — James E. Matthews. 

Lieutenants — A. G. Jackson, J. G. Smith, John H. Spring(?). 

Simflower Rangers, of Sunflower County, organized as independent 
cavalry 9 August, 1862. 
Captain — A. H. Farrar. 
Lieutenants— S. H. Rogers, F. W. Goff, D. C. Portwood. 

Crump Avengers, of Panola County, organized as partisan rangers 
16 August, 1862. 

Captain — Samuel Matthews. 

Lieutenants — G. W, Nelson, Samuel Z. Williamson, George W. Bonner. 

Original roll, 62. 

Lafayette" Cavalry, organized as independent company 18 October, 
1862. 

Captain — D. W. Rogers. 

Lieutenants — B. M. Mitchell, J. L. Pitman, J. C. ^Furray. 



942 MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. • 

Hunt Rangers, organized in De Soto County 12 March, 1863. 

Captain — Williamson Hunt. 

Lieutenants — Alexander Hay, John T. Hunt, Thomas Ruffin. 

Rebel Troop, Holmes County, independent cavalry, organized July, 
1862. 

Captain — R. L. Adams. 

Lieutenants — L. W. Red, James M. Wilson, H. Harrington. 

Yalobusha Company, organized i June, 1862. 

Captain — W. J. Owens. 

Lieutenants— J. T. Fly, W. D. Robertson, J. U. York. 

Kilpatrick's Company, enHsted at Camp Gholson July, 1863. 
Captain — William Kilpatrick. 
First Lieutenant— W. G. Halbert. 
Enrolled, 35. 

Attala Rangers, organized u July, 1862. Minute Men. 
Captain — Samuel Williams. 
First Lieutenant — S. G. Jennings. 
Second Lieutenant — R. M. Harris. 
Third Lieutenant — Wiley Holly. 



ARMSTRONG'S COMPANY— CAVALRY. 

A company organized by Capt. F. M. Armstrong, of men under 18 
and over 45 years of age. Ordered from Cotton Gin May 15, 1864, to 
report at Aberdeen for provost duty. 



LOCAL DEFENSE COMPANIES. 

Under the call of the Governor for companies for local defense, to 
serve six months, in 1863, a large number of companies were formed 
throughout the State. A list of twenty-six is given in the Adjutant- 
General's report of November, 1863. Rolls are on file of the following: 

Home Guards, company enHsted 19 October, 1863. 

Captain — J. C. Barnes. 

Lieutenants — G. W. Walker, William Norwood, J. P. Touchstone. 

Thirty-three non-conscripts. 

Capital Guards, organized at the machine shop of J. O. Stevens May 
2, 1863, at Jackson. 

Captain — W. W. Hardy. 

Lieutenants — J. F. O'Sullivan, A. F. Cameron, T. Smith. 

Original roll, 71. 



MILITARY HISTORY OF MISSISSIPPI. 943 

Brandon Company, Mounted Infantry, local defense, organized 26 
April, 1863. 

Captain — William P. Maxey. 

Lieutenants — B. M. Melton, William Thornton. 

Enrolled, 59. 

Merwin Guards, Reserves. 
Captain — H. Newton Berry. 

Lieutenants — Joseph A. Thompson, Nathaniel M. Collins, William 
L. Evans. 

Company raised at Enterprise by Captain Berry, formerly of Four- 
teenth Infantry, enrolling officer. 

Brandon Company, Infantry, local defense, organized 27 April, 1863. 

Captain— Richard Cooper. 

Lieutenants — J. A. Whitfield, L. D. Rhodes. 

Enrolled, 55. . 



V /■ 



944 MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 



WAR WITH SPAIN, 1898. 



The State of Mississippi was first involved in a Cuban revolutfon during 
the administration of Governor John A. Quitman. There was a Missis- 
sippian among the revolutionists executed at Santiago in 1848 with Lopez. 
The final revolution began in February, 1895, under the leadership of 
Maceo and Marti, who sailed to the island from Femandina, Fla. In 
1896, when the revolution was at its height, and General Weyler had not 
yet taken command, the Legislature of Mississippi adopted a resolution 
extending sympathy to the Cuban people in their struggle for liberty and 
independence, adding: "We call on the Congress and the President of 
these United States, and request them to grant belligerent rights to the 
Cuban Republic." In January, 1S98, upon information of the condition 
of the island under the Weyler administration, received from Maj. George 
L. Donald, the Legislature resolved that "we believe it to be the duty of 
the United States Government to at once intervene, peaceably if it can, 
but forcibly, if it must, to save the people of Cuba from the cruel fate of 
annihilation by the barbarous and inhuman methods of the Spanish Gov- 
ernment." The representatives of the United States Government in the 
first year of the McKinley administration led to the recall of Weyler, and 
the proposal of Cuban autonomy. But the revolution continued, and 
on February 15, 1898, the battleship Maine, sent to Havana harbor on the 
request of Consul Fitzhugh Lee, was destroyed by an explosion. This was 
followed by a popular demand for war, but the government restricted itself 
to proposals of intervention and demand for an armistice. Attempts to 
form an European coalition against the United States, and preparation in 
the United States for war, followed, until war was declared in April, upon 
which the President called upon the States, April 21, for 125,000 men. 

The quota of Mississippi was two regiments, and Governor McLaurin, 
on April 29, 1898, called for volunteers. The State had no funds on hand, 
but as all expenses were to be borne by the United States, indi-vidual 
credit sufficed. Camp Port Henry was established near Jackson, under 
command of Col. George C. Haskins, May 10, and the Capitol Light 
Guards was the first company to go into camp there, rapidly followed by 
other companies of the National Guard, which furnished over half the men 
enlisted. 

The First Regiment Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, was mustered in at 
the camp May 26, 1898, and left for the United States Army camp at 
Chickamauga Park, May 30. The principal otTicers of this regiment were 
as follows: Colonel, George M. Go van; Lieutenant-Colonel, H. O. Wil- 
liams; Majors, George L. Donald, D. Price Porter; Surgeon, Robert L. 
Turner; Assistant Surgeons, H. L. Bauer, F. M. Sheppard; Adjutant, 
George S. Yerger; Quartermaster, William Henry, succeeded by R. H. 



m^ 



MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 946 

Campbell; Chaplain, Frank M. Keene; Chief Musician, Carl Leake; Cap- 
tains — Company A, Thomas H. Shields, Vicksburg; Company B, Edgar 
N. Coffey, Fayette; Company C, Frank L. Balin, Natchez; Company D, 
Edgar R. DuMont, Scranton; Company E, Henry E. Ramsey, Hazel- 
hurst; Company F, James O. Fuller, Jackson; Company G, William F. 
Scales, Wesson; Company H, Daniel D. Ewing, Femwood; Company I, 
Charles W. Schamber, Meridian; Company K, R. M. Dease, Hickory; 
Company L, Archie Fairly, Hattiesburg; Company M, Charles R. Shan- 
non, Ellis ville. 

The Second Regiment was mustered at the Jackson camp June 9, 
1898, about the time the first army sailed from Tampa. The principal 
officers of this regiment were: Colonel, William A. Montgomery; Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, "Devereaux Shields; Majors, George C. Hoskins, John P. 
Mayo; Adjutant, Joseph M. Jayne, Jr.; Quartermaster, Hiram Cassedy, 
Jr.; Surgeon (Major) M. W. Hamilton; Surgeon (Captain) Henry C. 
Kent; Chief Musician, Hiram K. Ford, succeeded by W. G. Leslie; 
Chaplain, E. D. Soloman; Captains — Company A, Elles Cromwell, West 
Point; Company B, Edgar H. Woods, Rosedale; Company C, Henry T. 
Ireys, Greenville; Company D, Cicero L. Lincoln, Columbus; Company E, 
John W. Henderson, Tunica; Company F, Louis M. Southw^orth, Carroll- 
ton; Company G, Harvey J. Jones, Water Valley; Company H, Eugene 
Montgomer>^ Natchez; Company I, James S. Butler, Yazoo City; Com- 
pany K, Edmond F, Noel, Lexington; Company L, John B. McFarland, 
Aberdeen; Company M, James A. Glover, Friars' Point. Company M 
was from Memphis, and there was a sprinkling of recruits from Western 
and other States in both regiments, but mainly in the Second. 

Under the second call by the President, in which the quota of Missis- 
sippi was six companies, the Third Regiment was organized at Camp 
Henry, and mustered in August 4, with the following principal officers: 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Robert W. Banks; Majors, Robert L. Cook, Jr., 
Washington D. Gibbs, Jr.; Assistant Surgeons, P. A. Scale, R. A. Ander- 
son, D. S. Humphreys; Chaplain, John A. Randolph; Captains — Com- 
pany A, Samuel L. Gwin, Greenwood; Company B, W. E. Hopkins, 
Hickory; Company C, Charles G. McGhee, Columbus; Company D, 
Alden Trotten, Lexington; Company E, Robert L. Butler, Mead\411e; 
Company F, F. T. Raiford, Senatobia. Some of these companies were 
almost entirely enlisted in Chicago and New Orleans and in various States 
outside of Mississippi. The regiments included some of the finest young 
men of the State, and their Colonels were veterans of the Confederate 
Army. It was not the fortune of these commands to reach the field of 
battle. They were part of that "mighty army in camp, ready and eager 
for the field," in the words of President McKinley, that "should be given 
equal credit with those who participated in the short but decisive cam- 
paigns in Cuba. It was their presence, ready at an hour's notice, for any 
emergency, that taught the enemy that further resistance would be 
hopeless." The First Regiment was mustered out at Columbia, Tenn., 
December 20, 1898; the Second at the same place on the following day, 



946 * MILITARY HISTORY OP MISSISSIPPI. 

and the Third at Albany, Ga., March 17, 1899. Colonel Govan died not 
long after the war. 

Another command formed in the State was the Fifth Immune Regi- 
ment, U. S. Volunteers, mustered in at Columbus, composed of enlistments 
from Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, and commanded by Colonel 
H. D. Money, Jr., of Mississippi. James K. Vardaman, of Mississippi, was 
one of the Majors. This regiment was one of those that relieved the army 
of General Shafter at Santiago, when courage was required to face the 
danger of pestilence, and did garrison duty from August, 1898, to March, 
1899. 



LIST OP GENERAL OFPICERS. 



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MAGN'OLIA STATE FLOWER OF MISSISSIPPI. 



PART VI 



Executive, Judicial and Legislative Departments. 

Biographical. 

Sketches of State Officials. 

Sketches of Senators and Representatives in Congress. 

Sketches of State Senators and Representatives. 




Hon. Edmond Favor Noel, Governor. Hon. Luther Manship, Lieut.-Govemor. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES 
AND BOARDS. 



CHIEF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

(Code, 1906, Sec. 2370, et seq.; Constitution, Art. V.) 

Governor — His Excellency, Edmond Favor Noel, of Lexington, 
LieiUenant-Govcrnor — Luther Manship, of Jackson. 
Private Secretary — William J. Buck, of Jackson. 



EDMOND FAVOR NOEL. 

Edmond Favor Noel, Governor of the State of Mississippi, was bom 
March 4, 1856, on his father's farm near Lexington, in Holmes County, 
Miss. He is the son of Leland Noel and his wife, Margaret M. (Sanders) 
Noel. His paternal ancestors came from France to England about the 
time of the Huguenot massacre, and from England to the Rappahannock 
River district, Essex County, Virginia, in 1680. There they lived until 
in 1835, the Governor's father, Leland Noel, came to Mississippi, settling 
in Holmes County, on the farm which is still in the possession of the 
family. He served in the Confederate Army, and while a prisoner in 
the hands of the Federals in 1863 suffered such exposure that he lost his 
eyesight therefrom, and was blind to the time of his death, thirty-three 
years later. Governor Noel attended irregular country schools until the 
fall of 1872, when he entered the high school at Louisville, Ky., taking a 
three years' course there. Each year he took one of the highest honors, 
and at the close of his last session was awarded the highest honor of his 
class. He did not enter a college or professional school, but read law 
under his uncle. Major D. W. Sanders, an attorney of Louisville; was ad- 
mitted to the bar in March, 1877, at Lexington, after an examination in 
open court. He located for practice in Lexington, where he has since re- 
sided and practiced ; his last law partner was A. M. Pepper. Governor Noel 
was elected Representative in 1881, District Attorney of Fifth Judicial 
District in 1887, State Senator in 1895 and again iff 1899, candidate for 
Governor in 1903, elected Governor in 1907. During the Spanish-Amer- 
ican war he was a Captain in the Second Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, 
under General Fitzhugh Lee, serving from May to December, 1S98. He 
is a Democrat and has been a member of the State Executive Committee 
and Chairman of the Coimty Committee for several years each ; is a member 
of the Missionary Baptist Church, a Knight Templar, a Shriner, Knight 
of Honor, Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the World. He was married 
September 12, 1905, at Pickens, Miss., to Mrs. Alice (Tye) Neilson, daugh- 
ter of Col. J. F. Tye and wife, Josephine (Clarke) Tye. Mrs. Noel's ances- 
tors came from Mecklenburg County, N. C, her grandmother's brother, 

(951) 



952 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 

Nathaniel Alexander, was one of the first Governors of North Carolina, and 
her great-grandfather, Abraham Clarke, was one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence. Governor Noel was the author of the 
present Primary Election Law, of the proposition to make all officers 
elective for terms of four years, presented as a Constitutional amend- 
ment to the Legislature in 1882, also of the amendment making judges 
elective, which received three-fourths of the popular vote. It may be 
noted of Governor Noel that though not winning in every political con- 
test, he has never failed of election to an office which he sought. His 
contests have always been purely individual, free from combinations or 
factional alignments, and the same may be said of his entire political 
career. 

LUTHER MANSHIP. 

Luther Manship, of Jackson, Lieutenant-Governor of the State of 
Mississippi, was bom April 16, 1853, in that city. He is the son of Charles 
Henry Manship and his wife, Adaline (Dailey) Manship. His father was 
a native of Maryland, his mother's parents came from Boston, Mass., to 
New Orleans in 1826, thence to Jackson, Miss., in 1834. The father of 
the subject of this sketch was Postmaster of Jackson under the Confed- 
erate Government two terms, was City Clerk and Mayor of Jackson three 
times before 1863, in which year he surrendered the city to General Sher- 
man and the Federal Army. He served as a member of the Insane Asylum 
Building Board, as member of the Penitentiary Board, and at the time 
of his death was member of the Bhnd Institute Board, in. fact he served 
the State on one or another of these boards for fifty years. Mr. Manship 
was educated at the public schools of Jackson, Miss. He serv^ed an 
apprenticeship in the machine shops of the Illinois Central Railroad at 
McComb City, and acted as engineer on that line for a short time. He 
was a member of the City Council of McComb City 1880-81 ; member of 
Jackson City Council, 1885-1895; member of Mississippi State Legis- 
lature, 1896— 1900. He served as Major on General William Henry's 
staff under Governor A. J. McLaurin, 1896-1900; as Major on Gov. 
James K. Vardaman's staff, 1 904-1 908; was Trustee of Mississippi 
Blind Institute, 1896— 1900 and Trustee of Jackson pubHc schools for 
several years; was elected Lieutenant-Governor November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Manship is a Democrat and was President of the Executive Committee 
of Pike County, 1882-83. He is a Methodist, a Mason, a Knight Tem- 
plar, Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias. He is the author of a number 
of well known and successful lecture entertainments, to wit : "Lights and 
Shadows," "Song and Story," and "From the Big House to the Cabin." 
He was married January 26, 1881, at MagnoUa, Miss., to Mary Belmont 
Phelps, daughter of James Fisher Phelps and wife, Elizabeth Certain 
Phelps, of Huntsville, Ala, Mr. and Mrs. Manship have six children, as 
follows: Charles Phelps Manship, of Baton Rouge, La.; Luther Man- 
ship, Jr., of Jackson; Mrs. Belmont (Manship) Voltz. of Jackson, and 
Douglas James, William Lewis and Elizabeth Theresa, all of Jackson. 






1. -■:,-. M 






EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 963 

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

Secretary of State _. J. W. Power 

Assistant Secretary.. _ Henry Yerger 

JOSEPH WITHERS POWER. 

Joseph Withers Power, Secretary of State, was bom March 2, 1867, 
at Jackson, Miss., and is the son of John Logan Power and wife, Jane 
(Wilkinson) Power. His paternal ancestors were of pure Irish descent, 
his maternal line was from Scotland. His father came to America from 
Ireland when about fifteen years old; was a printer and publisher for 
years, a Confederate veteran and was serving his second term as Secre- 
tary of State at the time of his death, September 23, 1901. The Wilkin- 
sons and Smylies of the maternal line have been citizens of Mississippi 
since 1798.. Joseph W. Power received his primary education in the 
schools of Jackson, and later attended the Southwestern Presbyterian 
University at Clarksville, Tenn. After leaving school he assisted his 
father in the publishing business, and was afterwards a bookkeeper. 
At the death of his father he was assistant in the office of the Secretary 
of State, and was appointed to succeed his father in 1901 by Governor 
A. H. Longino; he was elected in 1903 and re-elected in 1907. Mr. Power 
is a Democrat, member of the Episcopal Church, Mason, Odd Fellow 
and Kjiight of Pythias. He was married November 18, 1896, at Fayette, 
Miss,, to Eva Truly, daughter of Richard Harrison Truly and wife, Mary 
Key Truly. Mrs. Power's paternal ancestors came to Mississippi from 
Virginia, maternal from South Carolina. Her ancestor, James Truly, 
came to the Natchez District from Virginia in 1773. Her paternal grand- 
father was with General Jackson at the battle of New Orleans and served 
as Sergeant in the * 'Jefferson Troop" under Colonel Thomas Hinds. 
Her father was a soldier of the Confederacy. Mr. and Mrs. Power have 
two children — Dorothy Hunter and Mary Evalyn. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES AND HISTORY. 

Created by Act of the Legislature, approved February 26, 1902, organ- 
ized March 14, 1902. The government of the department is vested in a 
board of nine Trustees; its management is in the hands of a Director, 
elected by the Board for a term of six years. 

Trustees. Term expires. 

Stephen D. Lee, President . ..January i, 1912 

Charles B. Galloway .January i, 1910 

Richard W. Jones . January i, 1914 

J. R. Preston. January i, 1912 

Edward Mayes January i, 1910 

R. H. Thompson January i, 1914 

Franklin L. Riley January i, 1910 

J. M. White January i, 191 2 

G. H. Brunson January i, 1914 



STATE OFFICIALS 




Hon. George Clifton Myers, Supreme Court Clerk. 

f Hon. Dunbar Rowland, State Historian. Hon. Robert Virgil Fletcher, Atfy-General. 

Hon. Thomas Monroe Henry, Insurance Commissioner. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 955 

Director Dunbar Rowland 

Assistant Mrs. Eron Opha Rowland 

DUNBAR ROWLAND. 

Dunbar Rowland, Director of the Department of Archives and His- 
tory, was bom August 25, 1864, at Oakland, Miss. He is the son of Dr. 
William Brewer Rowland and wife, Mary (Bryan) Rowland. His 
mother was a direct descendant of Charles Moorman, of Louisa County, 
Virginia, who emancipated his slaves in 1778. Dr. William Brewer 
Rowland was the son of Col. Creed T. Rowland and wife, Matilda (Brewer) 
Rowland, both of whom were natives of Henry County, Virginia. In 
1840 Creed T. Rowland removed from Virginia and settled in Lowndes 
County, Mississippi, after which he moved to Aberdeen, Monroe County, 
and lived on his plantation near that city until his death in 1866. He 
was the son of Michael Rowland and Elizabeth (Hairston) Rowland, of 
Henry County, Virginia. Michael Rowland was a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary War and took part in the battle of Guilford Courthouse. He 
was the son of Andrew Rowland, a descendant of John Rowland, who 
was a native of Egham, Surrey County, England. John Rowland immi- 
grated to America in 1635 in the ship Dorset — John Flower, Master — 
and settled in Virginia. He w^as the son of John Rowland and wife, 
ScoHs (Pemberton) Rowland, of Surrey County, England, and grandson 
of Thomas Rowland, of Baconsthorpe, England. The name Rowland 
is of Norman origin, and was brought to England in the train of William 
the Conqueror. From England branches of the family spread into 
Wales and Scotland, and continued to be identified with the literature of 
Europe. 

Dunbar Rowland received his primary education in the private 
schools of Memphis, Tenn., and was prepared for college at Oakland 
Academy. In 1882 he entered the Freshman Class of the Mississippi 
A. and M. College, and was graduated in 1886 with the degree of B. S.; 
was first anniversarian of the Philotechnic Society in 1885, and dehvered 
the second alumni oration in 1888. In 1886 he entered the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Mississippi, and was graduated from that insti- 
tution in 1888 with the degree of LL.B.; was senior debater at commence- 
ment, June, 1888. In November, 18S8, he located in Memphis, Tenn., 
for the practice of law, where he remained four years, his culture and 
scholarly attainments attracting to him many friends and associates. 
In 1893 ^^r- Rowland returned to Mississippi and opened a law office at 
Cofleeville, at which place Dr. Edward Mayes, L. Q. C. Lamar and Gen. 
E. C. Walthall had practiced in the past. In 1902, when the Depart- 
ment of Archives and History was created by the Legislature, he was 
elected Director of the Department March 14, 1902, to which position 
he was re-elected November i, 1907, for the term beginning March 15, 
1908. He has written and edited a number of historical volumes, some 
of the most important being the Mississippi Official and Statistical Reg- 
ister of Mississippi, 1904; Mississippi Territorial Archives, Vol. i (1906); 



956 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 

Encyclopedia of Mississippi History (1907), Mississippi Official and Sta- 
tistical Register, 1908. In recognition of his services to the State the 
University of Mississippi conferred upon him the degree of LL.D., June, 

1906. In the summer of 1906 he went abroad for the purpose of inves- 
tigating the official archives of England, France and Spain which relate 
to the provincial history of Mississippi, the Legislature having provided 
funds for securing transcripts of original records. 

Dr. Rowland is a member of the Episcopal Church, member of the 
Sons of the Revolution, the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, and an 
active and honorary member of a number of historical societies in the 
United States. On December 20, 1906, he was married to Eron Opha 
Gregory, daughter of Major Benjamin B. Moore and wife, Ruth (Row- 
land) Moore. Major Benjamin B. Moore was the son of Dr. Lemuel 
Moore and wife, Eron Opha (Byrd) Moore, his mother was a descendant 
of the Byrd family of Westover; he was a soldier in both the Mexican 
and the Civil War, and at one time was associate editor of the Wetumpka 
Argus with William L. Yancey, of Alabama. 

OFFICE OF AUDITOR OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS. 

Auditor Public Accounts E. J. Smith 

Deputy Auditor D. L. Thompson 

General Bookkeeper . Miss Elizabeth Brand 

Individual Bookkeeper Leigh Watkins 

Revenue Clerk Smith Brand 

Warrant and Pension Clerk Miss Ellie Hederman 

ELIAS JEFFERSON SMITH. 

Elias Jefferson Smith, of Jackson, Auditor of the State of Mississippi, 
was bom November 7, 1858, near Buena Vista, in Chickasaw County, 
Miss. He is the son of John Edward Smith and wife, Martha Elizabeth 
(Brewer) Smith, His paternal ancestors came from England and settled 
in Virginia, going from there to North Carolina, and thence to Alabama 
and Mississippi; those on his mother's side came from Kentucky and 
Alabama. The father of the subject of this sketch enlisted, in 186 1, in 
the Confederate Army, joining the "Buena Vista Rifles," afterward 
known as Company A, Seventeenth Mississippi Regiment; he was killed 
at the Battle of Gettysburg, in 1863. ^I^- Smith obtained his early 
education in the country schools of Chickasaw County and later took a 
course at Leddin's Business College, Memphis, Term. He was Auditor 
of the city of Jackson for six years, and has been employed in the State 
Auditor's office for seventeen years. He is a Democrat, a Methodist, a 
Knight of Pythias, Woodman of the World and member of the Order of 
Elks. Mr. Smith was elected Auditor of Public Accounts November 5, 

1907. He was married November 8, 1882, at Aberdeen. Miss., to Minnie 
Troup, daughter of Colonel Walter Wells Troup and wife, Mary Ewing 
Troup. 



.::fi 



ii.:;\,u -■) •; i; 



:\ '-^vA 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 957 

OFFICE OF STATE TREASURER " ' 

Treasurer G. R. Edwards. Jr 

Cashier G. R. Edwards 

Bookkeeper ' ; J. G. Galcera.v 

GEORGE ROBERT EDWARDS. 

George Robert Edwards, Jr., of McCool, Treasurer of the State of 
Mississippi, was bom January 7, 1873, at Carthage, Leake County, Miss. 
He is the son of George Robert Edwards and wife, Emma (Colbert) 
Edwards. His paternal ancestors came from Georgia to Mississippi; 
his father was a soldier in Walthall's Brigade, and took part in the battles 
of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Lookout Mountain; was taken 
prisoner and confined at Rock Island, 111., for sixteen months. Mr. 
Edwards obtained his early education at Carthage High School and at 
French Camp Academy; attended the Southwestern Presbyterian Uni- 
versity, Clarksville, Tenn., during the year 1890-91. He began life as a 
teacher in the common schools of Mississippi and taught for several years 
in Attala and Holmes Counties. He then learned stenography and 
reporting at Meridian, and from 1895 to 1903 was Private Secretary of 
Hon. John Sharp Williams. He became Governor James K. Vardaman's 
Private Secretary January 16, 1904, and held that post till November i, 
1906; was elected State Treasurer November 5, 1907. Mr. Edwards is 
a Democrat; belongs to several Masonic organizations, also Woodmen 
of the World, Knights and Ladies of Honor and the Farmers' Educational 
and Co-operative Union. Hewas married, at McCool, June 18, 1903,. to 
Nina Winters, daughter of Calvin Jiles Winters and Nancy Margaret 
Winters. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards have two children — Margaret Ruth and 
Emma Colbert. 

OFFICE OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Attorney-General R. V. Fletcher 

Assistant Attorney-General George Butler 

Stenographer J. B. Dodson 

ROBERT VIRGIL FLETCHER. 

Robert Virgil Fletcher, of Pontotoc, Attorney-General of the State 
of Mississippi, was born September 27, 1869, at Williamstown, Grant 
County, Ky. He is the son of John M. Fletcher and wife, Mar\' Luman 
Fletcher. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were originally from 
Virginia and settled in Tennessee and Kentucky. Mr. Fletcher obtained 
his early education in the common schools, and in the high schools of 
Williamstown and Taylorsville, Ky. For several years he was a post- 
graduate student at the University of Mississippi but did not complete 
the course. He taught in the public and high schools of Mississippi from 
1893 to 1899, then was admitted to the bar in the latter year, after a 
course of reading in the law office of the late C. B. Mitchell, of Pontotoc. 



O'i 



STATE OFFICIALS 




Hon. Wirt Adams, Revenue Agent. 




Miss Mattie Plunkett, State Librarian. 





Hon. J. N. Powers, Supt. Educatioi 




Hon. Henry Edward Blakeslee, 

Commissioner of Agriculture and 

Commerce. 




Hon. E. H. Nail, Land Commissioner. 



Hon. G. R. Edwards, State Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. • 969 

He became Assistant Attorney-General by appointment of Attorney- 
General Williams, January i, 1906. Upon the death of his chief he was 
appointed to the office of Attorney-General by Governor Vardaman, 
March 26, 1907; at the primary election in August, 1907, he was nomi- 
nated for a full term and was elected November 5, 1907. Mr. Fletcher 
is a Democrat and has served for years as Secretary of the County Execu- 
tive Committee; he is a member of the M, E. Church South, and is 
steward of his church; is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias, 
holding high rank in all three orders. He was married June 28, 1893, in 
Corinth, Ky., to Etta Childers, daughter of W. H. and Louisa S. Childers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher have three children — Ernest Lamar, Louise and 
Paul. 

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION. 

Superintendent of Education J. N. Powers 

Secretary W. H. White 

JOSEPH NEELY POWERS. 

Joseph Neely Powers, of West Point, Superintendent of Education of 
the State of Mississippi, was born March 15, 1869, at Havana, Hale County, 
Ala. He is the son of Rev. William Ira Powers and wife, Julia Westwood 
(Towler) Powers. His father was a pioneer preacher of the M. E. Church 
South and was a Chaplain in the Confederate Army; his mother had 
literary tastes, writing much for the current magazines. Mr. Powers 
attended a county school at Bladen Springs, Ala., also studied at Liv- 
ingston Academy and Tuskegee Military Institute. He began his col- 
legiate course at Southern University, Greensboro, Ala., and completed 
it at the University of Chicago, receiving the degree of A. M. He spent 
one year at Louisville Medical College, where he won the medal on micro- 
scopy. He has been a teacher in the public schools of Mississippi for 
many years; w^as appointed Superintendent of Education by Governor 
Vardaman in 1907 and was elected by the people November 5, 1907. 
Mr. Powers is a Methodist, a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, an Odd Fellow 
and member of the Order of Elks. He was married, December 22, 1889, 
at Butler, Ala., to Ada Gavin, daughter of David Gavin and wife, Jennie 
Davis Gavin, of Bergamot, Ala. Mr. and Mrs. Powers have two children 
— Davis Neely and Ada Aline. 



OFFICE OF REVENUE AGENT. 

Revenue Agent Wirt Adams 

Deputy A. D. Galloway 

Deputy J. C. Johnson 

Deputy P. L. Clifton 

Deputy L. F. Chiles 



960 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 



WIRT ADAMS. 



Wirt Adams, of Jackson, Revenue Agent of the State of Mississippi, 
was bom February 12, 1852, at Jackson, Miss. He is the son of William 
Wirt Adams and wife, Sallie Huger Mayrant. George Adams, grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was United States District Attorney 
of Mississippi from 1830 to 1836, and United States District Judge from 
1836 to 1839. General William Wirt Adams, his father, was a soldier of 
the Confederacy ; was commissioned Colonel in the First Cavalry Regiment 
October 15, 1861, and Brigadier-General September 28, 1863, and served 
throughout the war; was tendered a cabinet commission in the Confed- 
erate Government by President Davis, but declined to accept, preferring 
a position in the field. Mr. Adams attended the preparatory schools in 
Jackson, Miss., and in Virginia; entered the Virginia Military Institute 
at Lexington, Virginia, and was graduated therefrom in 1873; was grad- 
uated from the law department of the University of Virginia in 1878 ; ap- 
pointed State Revenue Agent by Governor Robert Lowry in 1886, and was 
twice reappointed by Governor John M. Stone; elected by the people in 
1895, and re-elected in 1899, ^9°3 ^.nd in 1907, without opposition. Mr. 
Adams is a Democrat ; member of the Episcopal Church ; ^lason, Knight 
Templar, Shriner, Knight of Pythias and Odd Fellow; was married at 
Jackson, Miss., November 21, 1882, to Sallie Yerger, daughter of William 
Swann Yerger and wife, Henrietta Rucks, of Washington County, Miss. 
Mrs. Adams' father was a soldier of the Confederacy; he was a son of 
George S. Yerger and nephew of Edward Yerger. Mrs. Adams died at 
Charlottesville, Va., November i, 1905, leaving two children, Mayrant 
and Norvelle. During his term as a State official, which is the longest 
continuous term in the same office in the history of the State, Mr. Adams 
has made a record for steadfast devotion to the public interests. 



OFFICE OF INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Insurance Commissioner T. M. Henry 

Deputy W. J. Miller 

Clerk S- P. Henry 

Clerk 

THOMAS MONROE HENRY. 

Thomas Monroe Henry, of Jackson, Insurance Commissioner of the 
State of Misissippi, was born Febraary 4, 1857, at Hillsboro, Scott County, 
Miss. He is the son of Patrick Henry and wife, Mary Ann Chambers. 
The father of the subject of this sketch came to Mississippi from Alabama 
and settled in Scott County; was a soldier of the Conefderacy and served 
throughout the war; was made a Lieutenant in 1862 and served in the 
Thirty-sixth Mississippi Regiment in the army of General Joseph E. John- 
ston. John M. Henry, subject's grandfather, served under General Andrew 
Jackson in the Creek War. Mr. Henry attended the public schools of 



; - .» ■i 



• i. Di 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. « 961 

Scott County, under the instruction of Miss Whittington, Miss Laura 
Bennett, Mr. Hamiter and Mr. Herndon ; left school at fourteen years of 
age and went to work for his support; was employed as clerk and book- 
keeper at Forest and Morton until 1878; resided in Brookhaven from 1878 
to 1883, bookkeeper and merchant; appointed Revenue and Insurance 
Clerk in Auditor's office by Sylvester Gwin m 1885 ; reappointed by W. W. 
Stone; appointed Deputy Auditor by W. D. Holder and W. Q. Cole; 
elected Auditor of Public Accounts November 3, 1903. Mr. Henry has 
been active in the establishment of the Confederate Soldiers' Home at 
Beauvoir by the Sons of Veterans. He has always been a Democrat; is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
Red Men and Masons; was married to Laura Brown Pickens, daughter of 
Samuel Anderson Pickens and wife, Martha Eidom Pickens, of Holmes 
County; married second time to Carrie Maud Pickens. Mr. Henry has 
two children by his first marriage, Samuel Pickens and Laura Mabel. 
He was elected Insurance Commissioner November 5, 1907, succeeding 
Hon. W. Q. Cole, who was not a candidate for re-election. Mr. Henry 
has faithfully served the State in various capacities for twenty-five years. 



OFFICE OF ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 
Adjutant-General 



RAILROAD COMMISSION. 

First District J. A. Webb 

Second District F. M. Lee 

Third District . W. R. Scott 

Secretary T. R. Maxwell 

JOHN ADDISON WEBB. 

John Addison "Webb, of Jackson, Railroad Commissioner of the State 
of Mississippi, was born September 16, 1843, near Lexington, in Rock- 
bridge County, Va. He is the son of Michael Douglass Webb and wife, j 
Mary (Wilson) Webb. His maternal grandparents came from County \ 
Down, Ireland, and settled in Virginia. Mr. Webb attended the rural ] 
schools of his county in boyhood, but the Civil War cut off his opportunity ] 
for advanced education. He enlisted as a private in Company H, Fourth 
Virginia Infantry; in January, 1S62, joined the "Rockbridge Grays." 
He w'as with Gen. Stonewall Jackson in all his campaigns; was wounded 
twice in Second Battle of Manassas; returning to service, was wounded • 
at Spottsylvania in the "Bloody Angle"; after recovery was attached "' 
to General Early's staff till the surrender. His title of Captain was given 
him in the troubled days of 1875. Mr. Webb began railroad work in 
1866, and from express messenger advanced until he had choice of the 
best agencies in his State; has been General Agent at Shreveport, La., 
31 



.ruJl 



STATE OFFICIALS 




^^C:3^--^; 









-W 








Hon. John Addison Webb 
Raflroad Commissioner. 



Hon. Francis Marion Lee 
Railroad Commissioner. 




Hon. W. R. Scott. 
Railroad Commissioner. 





Col. William Alexander Montgomery 
Penitentiary Trustee. 



Hon. LeRoy Thomas Taylor 
Penitentiary Trustee. 



\ :;: 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 963 

for the V. S. & P. R. R. and at Jackson and Greenville, Miss., for the ! 
I. C. R. R. In 1898 he vv'as elected Secretary of the Mississippi Railroad 

Commission, serving until 1904; in 1907 was elected Railroad Commis- j 
sioner. He was a member of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of Jack- 
son from 1 90 1 to 1904. Mr. Webb is a Democrat; served on his County 

Executive Committee from 1876 to 1907; is a Presbyterian, and belongs 1 

to the order of Masons^ the Odd Fellows, Knights of Honor, Knights and j 

Ladies of Honor, Knights of Pythias and others. He was married ] 

June 8, 1870, at Vaiden, Miss., to Sallie Adaline Gordon, daughter of | 
Edward B. and Mary (Calhoun) Gordon, of Carroll County. His wife's 

ancestors came from South Carolina to Kentucky and thence to Missis- 1 

sippi; her great-great-grandfather, Patrick Cain, was a Revolutionary 1 

soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Webb have ten children, as follows: William j 

Gordon Webb, of Jackson; John Guy Webb, of Beaum.ont, Texas; j 

Maurice Sidney Webb, of Jackson; Leila May Webb and Nina Poague -j 

Webb, both of Jackson; Mrs. Bessie Sykes (Webb) Hoar, of Greenville, i 

Miss.; Sadie Elizabeth, Clara Belle, Lillian Hardy and George Hunter j 

Webb, all in Jackson. ,j 

FRANCIS MONROE LEE. ) 

Francis Monroe Lee, of McComb, Railroad Commissioner of the State 1 

of Mississippi, was born August 29, 1856, near Osyka, in Pike County, s 

Miss. He is the son of Zachariah Zion Lee and wife, Sophrona (Courtney) j 

Lee. Mr. Lee acquired the rudiments of education at a rural school of -1 

the pioneer type, in a building which he describes thus: "A log house \ 

with a log sawed out of one end of the building to furnish light; this j 

opening was closed with a rough board fastened \\-ith a leather strap and ■ 

opening downward, with small sticks as legs, and this was the writing 1 

desk for the scholars." He was a farmer, and later a blacksmith -for ten j 

years; was City Marshal of McComb City for eleven years, then was I 

elected Sheriff of his county; in 1907 w^as elected to the office of Railroad j 

Commissioner. Mr. Lee is a Democrat, a Baptist and deacon of his church, j 

a Mason, Odd Fellow, Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the World. ] 

He was married, December 24, 1879, at Tangipahoa, La., to Elizabeth i 

Quillin, daughter of Avery Breed Quillin and wife, EHzabeth (Barksdale) I 

Quillin, of Osyka. Mr. and Mrs. Lee have two children — Mrs. Birdie J 
(Lee) Lovette and Francis Collins Lee, both living at McComb. 

WILLIAM ROBERT SCOTT. 

William Robert Scott, of Eupora, Railroad Onimissioner, was bom ' 

August 29, 1868, near Vaiden, Carroll County, Miss., and is the son of 
Andrew J. Scott, of Carroll County, and wife, SalHe (Teat) Scott, of 
Attala County. Mr. Scott attended the primary schools of Calhoun -j 

County at Slate Springs, his first teacher being Hon. A. F, Fox, M. C, • 
of West Point; was editor of "Eupora Progress" from 1890 to 1896; i 

elected Mayor of Eupora, Webster 0-)unty, Miss., in 1892; served until j 

1897; ^resigned and_entered the drug business "in that year. He was 



964 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 

elected to the State Senate in 1903 and served for a term of four years. 
In the Senate of 1 904-1 908 he was a member of the following committees: 
Public Works, Printing, Penitentiary and Prisons, Insurance, and Joint 
Committee on Enrolled Bills. Mr. Scott is a Democrat; a member of 
the Baptist Church, and unmarried. While a member of the press he 
was known as the '^Sam Jones of Mississippi Journalism," having been 
designated as such by Major James K. Vardaman, when editor of" the 
"Greenwood Enterprise." Mr. Scott was elected Railroad Commis- 
sioner November 5, 1907. 



OFFICE OF COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE AND 
COMMERCE. 

Commissioner . Henry Edward Blakeslee 

Clerk D. G. Haley 

HENRY EDWARD BLAKESLEE. 

Henry Edward Blakeslee, of Jackson, Commissioner of Agriculture 
and Commerce of the State of Mississippi, was bom November 22, 1866, 
at Pine Grove, Benton County, Miss. He is the son of Charles Thomas 
Blakeslee and wife, Mattie (Klyce) Blakeslee. His father was a native 
of Ashtabula County, Ohio; came to Tennessee in 1854 and was a soldier 
of the Thirteenth Tennessee Regiment, Vaughn's Brigade, during the 
Civil War. Mr. Blakeslee attended the public schools of Mississippi, but 
did not take a college course. He was a farmer until he was twenty-five 
years old; edited a newspaper at New Albany from 1891 to 1901; was 
at Tupelo in 1902, after which he went back to the old home; was Super- 
intendent of the State Capitol grounds at Jackson 1904-05 ; was appointed 
Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce May i, 1906, and in 1907 
was elected to this office for the regular term. ]\Ir. Blakeslee is a Demo- 
crat, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Conventions of 1896 
and 1900. He is a Methodist, a Mason, Odd Fellow and Knight of 
Pythias. He was married January 10, 1895, ^t New Albany, to Jennie 
Crockett Mothersheal. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeslee have four children — 
Carlie Cappleman, Lewie Crockett, Anna Vardaman and Henry Edward. 



OFFICE OF STATE LIBRARIAN. 

Librarian Miss Mattie D. Plunkett 

Assistant Librarian^ _: Miss Laurin Plunkett 

MISS mattie drunetta plunkett. 

Miss Mattie Drunetta Plunkett, of Jacks. «n, State Librarian of Mis- 
sissippi, was bom December 24, 1864, at Carthage, Miss., and is the daugh- 
ter of Joseph Lawson Plimkett and wife, P^liza Melinda Rawls. Her 



[mO 



■3 .:h.i. • 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 965 

father came to Mississippi from North Carolina and settled in Scott 
County, and was a practicing physician at Carthage for forty years. She 
attended the public schools at Carthage under the instruction of George J. 
Leftwich, and the luka Normal College tmder the instruction of Prof. ] 

H. A. Dean; taught school for several years; elected State Librarian by 
the Legislature January 15, 1900; re-elected in January, 1904, and in j 

January, 1908. Miss Plunkett is a member of the Baptist Church at ; 

Carthage, Miss. During her administration of the State Library it has '. 

been enlarged and developed, and is now occupying some of the hand- 
somest apartments of the new Capitol. 

. BOARD OF TRUSTEES STATE PENITENTIARY. 
(Code of 1906, Chapter 107, Sections 3589-3652.) 

Trustee C. C. Smith 

Trustee , W. A. Montgomery 

Trustee ._ -L. T. Taylor 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER MONTGOMERY. 

William Alexander Montgomery, of Edwards, Trustee of the Peniten- 
tiary of the State of Mississippi, was bom October 18, 1844, at Davis' 
Mill, in Winston County, Miss. He is the son of Charles Warren Mont- 
gomery and wife, Olivia Feree (Moore) Montgomery. His paternal 
ancestors came from South Carolina to Mississippi in the early part of 
the nineteenth century; his mother's family came from Tennessee. His 
mother's father, Gen. William Moore, was in the Seminole War, and with 
General Jackson at New Orleans in the War of 1812 ; was for many 3'ears 
a member of the Tennessee Legislature and was sent by that body in 
1861 to bear to the Confederate Government at Richmond the news of 
the secession of the State of Tennessee. Returning he raised a regiment 
for the Confederate service, but was persuaded to stay at home because 
of his advanced years and to hand his command over to his son, who went 
to the front and was killed at Murfreesboro. Mr. Montgomery obtained 
his early education in country schools and under private tutors, and later 
entered the Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn., but left soon after 
to enter the Confederate Army. He enlisted as a private; in March, 
1864 was commissioned from the ranks as Captain. After the war he 
went to Lexington, Ky., and took one course of law lectures. Being 
compelled to leave college through the death of his father in 1S66, he 
continued his law studies by private reading, and in 1868 was admitted 
to the bar and began practice. Mr. Montgomery was in command of 
the citizen soldiery that induced Governor Ames to disband his negro 
militia in 1875; in fact throughout the troubled rtvonst ruction time he 
was tireless in his efforts to overthrow the l)ase element that had gained 
control. He was a member of the State Senate in 1S78, and of the House 
of Representatives in 1897. During the Spanish-American War he com- 
manded the Second Regiment Mississippi Volunteers. He organized 



966' EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 

and commanded for a time a division at Panama Park, Fla., under Gen. 
Fitzhugh Lee. He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, and 
affiliates with a number of secret societies — Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias, Knights of Honor, Knights Templar, Shriners, Woodmen of 
the World and Legion of Honor. He was married December 23, 1868, 
to J. Mella Dupree, daughter of Colonel James Dupree and wife, Charlotte 
(Biggs) Dupree. She died March 28, 1882. On April 16, 1884, Mr. 
Montgomery was married a second time to Bettie Henry, daughter of 
Captain B. W. Henry and wife. Sue (Randolph) Henry. Of his first 
wife's children two are living — Charles Warren Montgomery of Edwards 
and Mrs. Olivia Feree (Montgomery) Champion; also two by his second 
marriage, William A., Jr., and Wilkins Henry. 

LE ROY THOMAS TAYLOR. 

LeRoy Thomas Taylor, of Verona, Trustee of the Penitentiary of the 
State of Mississippi, was bom December 10, 1846, at Woodlawn, Itawamba 
County, Miss. He is the son of Col. Clark Washington Taylor and wife, 
Louisa Jane (Keys) Taylor. His paternal ancestors came from England 
and settled in Virginia; those on his mother's side, the Keys family, 
came originally from Wales to North Carolina, but both his grandmothers 
were of Irish descent. Mr. Taylor attended the rural schools of his 
county and the high school at Fulton, but his hope of a collegiate educa- 
tion was thwarted by the breaking out of the war. In 1863 he was 
enrolled as First Lieutenant, Company I, Eleventh Mississippi Cavalry, 
Armstrong's Brigade. He was wounded and captured by the enemy at 
the battle of Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865; he had received his commission 
as Captain four days previous to this fight. Mr. Taylor's principal occu- 
pation has been that of farming, though he has given some time to com- 
mercial traveling and merchandizing. He has been a member of the 
Board of Aldermen of his town for ten years; was a State Senator 1900 
to 1904; Election Commissioner two years, and was elected Mayor of 
Verona in 1906. He is a Democrat, has been Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of his county; is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church 
and of the Masonic order. He was married December 15, 1868, at Pal- 
metto, Miss., to SalHe C. Calhoun, daughter of Dr. William Henry Cal- 
houn and wife, Jane Stuart Calhomi. His wife's grandfather, James 
Calhoun, was a brother of Vice-President John C. Calhoun, of South 
Carolina. The Calhoun family came originally from Scotland. Her 
maternal grandfather, Christopher Orr, was of Irish descent, and was 
the father of Governor James L. Orr, of South Carolina, and Judge J. A. 
Orr, of Columbus, Miss. Mrs. Sallie Calhoun Taylor died, leaving three 
children — Erin Taylor, now of Tupelo, Miss. ; Mrs. Nellie (Taylor) Honnall, 
Tupelo; and Swepson DeLette Taylor, of Verona. Mr. Taylor was 
married a second time, August 29, 1899, at Verona, to Laura Manor 
Holden, daughter of George Washington Holden and wife, Martha Susan 
(Jarratt) Holden, of Murf reesboro , Tenn. Her family, of mingled En- 
glish and Welch descent, came from North Carolina. 



M. ''J 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. 967 

CHARLES CLARK SMITH. 

Charles Clark Smith, of Insraore, Trustee of the State Penitentiary 
of Mississippi, was bom February 12, 1862, at Hickory Ridge, in Claiborne 
County, Miss. He is the son of Hezekiah Ford Smith and wife, Frances 
Jane (Owin) Smith. His paternal ancestors came from South Carolina, 
maternal from Virginia; his mother's grandmother was Sarah Harrison, 
a cousin of General WilUam Henry Harrison. Mr. Smith is not indebted 
to the schools for education, but says that all he has acquired was taught 
him by his mother. His occupation has been that of farmer and mer- 
chant. He is a Democrat and a member of the Order of Elks. He was 
married March 15, 1897, at Edwards, Hinds County, to Agnes Bethimia 
Goosey, daughter of Harvey Clay Goosey and wife, Clara Madaline 
(Petrie) Goosey, of New Orleans, La. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two 
children — Charles Arrighi and James Vardaman. 

BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS. 

E. F. Noel, Governor; J. W. Power, Secretary of State; R. V. Fletcher, : 

Attorney-General. . \ 

BOARD OF PUBLIC CONTRACTS. ] 

J. W. Power, Secretary of State; E. J. Smith, Auditor of Public Ac- 
counts; R. V. Fletcher, Attorney-General. ■ 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. j 

J. N. Powers, Superintendent of Education; J. W. Power, Secretary | 

of State; R. V. Fletcher, Attorney-General. 

JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT. 

The judicial power of the State shall be vested in a Supreme Court and 
such other courts as are provided for in this Constitution. .| 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. i; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. i; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. I.) j 

Constitution, 1890, Sec. 144. j 

The Supreme Court shall consist of three Judges, any two of whom, 1 

when convened, shall form a quorum. The Legislature shall divide the j 

State into three Supreme Court Districts, and the Governor, by and with i 

the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint one Judge for and 
from each district ; but the removal of a Judge to the State Capital during 
his term of office shall not render him ineligible as his own successor for 
the district from which he has removed. The present incumbents shall 
be considered as holding their terms of office from the State at large. 
(1817, Art. V, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 2; 1869. Art. VI 

Sec. 2.) 

Constitution 1890, Sec. 145. 



MEMBERS OF SUPREME COURT. 




Hon. Albart Hall Whitfield, Chief Justice. 



I 



Hon. Solomon Saladin Caiboon. 



Hon. Robert Burns Mayes. 



JUDICIARY. 969 

Districts — The State shall be divided into three Supienie Court Dis- 
tricts, as follows, to wit: 

The counties of Attala, Bolivar, Hinds, Holmes, Issaquena, Kemper, 
Lauderdale, Leake, Madison, Neshoba, Newton, Noxubee, Rankin, Scott, 
Sharkey, Sunflower, Warren, Washington, Winston and Yazoo shall con- 
stitute the First District. 

The counties of Adams, Amite, Claiborne, Clarke, Copiah, Covington, 
Franklin, Forrest, Greene, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, 
Jefferson Davis, Jones, Lamar, Lawrence, Lincoln, Marion, Pearl River, 
Perry, Pike, Simpson, Smith, Wayne, and Wilkinson shall constitute the 
Second District. 

And the coimties of Alcorn, Benton, Calhoun, Carroll, Chickasaw, Choc- 
taw, Clay, Coahoma, DeSoto, Grenada, Itawamba, Lafayette, Lee, Le- 
flore, Lowndes, Marshall, Monroe, Montgomery, Oktibbeha, Panola, Pon- 
totoc, Prentiss, Quitman, Tallahatchie, Tate, Tippah, Tishomingo, Tunica, 
Union, Webster and Yalobusha shall constitute the Third District. 
Code 1906, Sees. 4900-4953. 

SUPREME COURT. 

(Judges appointed by the Governor for a term of nine years.) 

Chief Justice — Albert Hall W^hitfield, of Jackson. 

Associate Justice — Solomon Saladin Calhoon, of Jackson. 

Associate Justice — Robert Bums Mayes, of Jackson, 

Clerk — George Clifton Myers, of Jackson. 

Deputy Clerk — Clayton H. Myers, of Jackson. ^ | 

Marshal — C. L. Johnson, of Jackson. \ 

Stenographer — ^J. M. McCracken. .1 

ALBERT HALL WHITFIELD. 

Albert Hall Whitfield of Jackson, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court 
of the State of Mississippi, was bom October 12, 1849, near Aberdeen, i 

Monroe County, Miss. He is the son of Robert Donnell Whitfield and 
wife, Jane Amanda (McMillan) Whitfield. His ancestors immigrated 
from EngUmd in 1679 in the ship "Prosperous," and settled in Vandemond 
County, Virginia, the first of the name to settle in America being Matthew 
Whitfield. The father of the subject of this sketch was a native of North 
Carolina, who Hved and had large planting interests near A})erdecn, Miss.; 
he was a graduate of Bingliani's School in North Carolina, and entered 
the Sophomore Class at Yale. Judge Whitfield was prepared for college 
by Prof. Henry Tutwiler, of the famous Greene Springs School (now in 
Hale County. Alabama) and Capt. G. W. Wright and Prof. Robert P. 
Tutwiler, assistants in the same school; entered the Lhiiversity of Missis- 
sippi and was graduated in 187 1 with first honor, taking the B. A. degree; 
was Adjunct Professor of Greek at the University of Mississippi from 
1871 to 187^; also taught Latin, English and History; took the degrees of 
A. M. and LL.B. while acting as Adjunct Prof<rssor; located at Aber- 



970 JUDICIARY. 

deen, Miss., for the practice of law in 1875, and continued there during 
1875 and 1876; removed to Grenada, Miss., in i876and continued the prac- 
tice there until 1889; removed to Oxford, Miss., in 1889 and formed a 
partnership for the practice of law with W. V. Sullivan; succeeded 
Chancellor Edward Mayes as Professor of Law at the University of Mis- 
sissippi in 1892; appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Mississippi in 1894 by Governor John M. Stone, and reappcjinted in 1903 
by Governor A. H. Longino; has been Chief Justice of the Supreme Court 
from April i, 1900, to the present time, January 14, 1908. He is a Demo- 
crat and member of the Baptist Church. Judge Whitfield is fond of lit- 
erature, is a writer of abiUty and force, and has contributed to the maga- 
zines of the country, one of the most notable contributions being "Shall 
the Philippines be Annexed?" which appeared in the January number, 
'1903, of the Cosmopolitan Magazine; was married December 13, 1876, at 
Grenada, Miss., to Isadore Buffaloe, daughter of Joseph George Monroe 
Buffaloe and wife, Marina Kitchen Robbins, who lived at Raleigh, North 
Carolina, and later at Grenada, Miss. Judge and Mrs. Whitfield have 
five children: Marina Robbins Alexander, wife of Chalmers Alexander, 
Esq., of the Jackson bar; Garland Quinche, Kate Coffman Hardy, wife 
of J. C. Hardy, President of -the A. and M. College; Albert Hall, Jr., and 
Robert Joseph. 

During Judge Whitfield's service on the bench he has handed down 
some of the most important decisions which have been made in the his- 
tory of the court, some of the most notable being: Railroad v. Adams, 77 
Miss., 194, which was, on appeal to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, unanimously affirmed; Adams v. Colonial Mortgage Co., 82 Miss.; 
Ballard v. Cotton Oil Co., 81 Miss., 507; Attoniey-General v. Powell, 77 
Miss., 543 ; Insurance Co. v. Phelps, 77 Miss., 625 ; Brahan v. Building and 
Loan Association, 80 Miss., 407; Millsaps v. Shotwell, 76 Miss., 923; Fire 
Insurance Co. v. State, 75 Miss., 24, and Morrison v. American Snuff Co.^ 
79 Miss., 330. 

Judge Whitfield's term expires May 10, 1912. 

SOLOMON SALADIN CALHOON. 

Solomon Saladin Calhoon, of Jackson, Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of Mississippi, was bom January 2, 1838, at Branden- 
burg, Meade County, Kentucky. He is the son of George Calhoon and 
wife, Louise Brandenburg. The Calhoons are of Scotch-Irish descent and 
immigrated to Virginia early in the eighteenth century; in the latter part 
of the century removed to Kentucky. The father of the subject of this 
sketch was a prominent lawyer of Kentucky and served as a member of the 
State Legislature m 1836; removed to Madison County, Miss., in 1838, 
bringing his son, the subject of this sketch, with him. The Brandenburgs, 
Judge Calhoon 's maternal ancestors, immigrated to Virginia from Berlin 
abouth75o, and later to Kentucky about 1790. He attended the common 
schools of Canton, Miss. ; entered Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., 
and continued studies there ten months, sessions of 1854 and 1855; read 



JUDICIARY. 971 

■ 

law while teaching school; was licensed to practice in 1856 by Cotesworth ; 

Pinckney Smith, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Mississippi, 
before he had reached his eighteenth birthday; was private secretary to 
Governor McWillie in 1857, and Secretary of the State Senate in 1858; 
edited the Yazoo Democrat in 1858 and 1859; was editor of the States 
Rights Democrat at Helena, Ark., in 1859 and i860; located in Canton, 
Miss., for the practice of law; enlisted in the Confederate Army March 26, 
1861, and served throughout the war in the Ninth and Tenth Mississippi 
Regiments as Lieutenant, Captain and Lieutenant-Colonel; was District 
Attorney from 1865 to 1868; Circuit Judge from 1876 to 1882; removed 
to Jackson, Miss., in 1882; was President of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion of 1890. Judge Calhoon's public duties have been many and varied, 
and in all the positions to which he has been called he has given honest, 
faithful and able service to the State. He is a Democrat and has taken 
a prominent position in party politics as a member of County and State 
Executive Committees; was a delegate from the State at large to the St. 
Louis Convention which nominated Mr. .Cleveland for the Presidency; 
is a member of the Episcopal Church, vestryman; is a Mason; was mar- 
ried December 21, 1865, at Kirkwood, Madison County, Miss., to Margaret 
McWillie, daughter of Governor William McWillie and wife, Catherine 
Anderson. Mrs. Calhoon's ancestors were of Scotch-Irish and Danish 
origin and settled in South Carolina. 

The opinions handed dowTi by Judge Calhoon have been numerous and 
important, involving large interests and deciding great questions, some of 
the more important being: Mississsippi Valley R. R. v. Southern R. R. Co., 
82 Miss.; Shaw v. Cable Co., 79; Town of Lexington v. the Union National 
Bank, 75; Sharpley V. Plant, 79; Hawkins ^r. Mangum, 78. 

Judge Calhoon's term expires May 10, 1909. 

ROBERT BURNS MAYES. 

Robert Burns Mayes, of Jackson, Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of Mississippi, was bom June 28, 1867, at Gallatin, 
Copiah County, Miss., He is the son of Herman Bowman Mayes and 
wife, Charity Barlow Mayes. He is a descendant of the Rev. William 
Mayes, who, in the year 161 1, immigrated to Virginia in the active 
ministry. His immediate parternal ancestors were Kentuckians; his 
father was a lawyer of prominence and was very active in public affairs 
during reconstruction days. Judge Mayes obtained his early education 
at the Hazlehurst public schools, and his collegiate training at the Uni- 
versty of Mississippi, at which institution he also studied law and took 
his Bachelor's degree in 1888. In 1890 he entered upon the practice of 
his profession. He was State Senator, 1892 to 1896; Chancellor, 1900 
to 1906, and succeeded Judge Truly on the Supreme Court Bench, May 10, 
1906. He is a Democrat, a Methodist and a Knight of Pythias. He was 
married February 21, 1900, to Lelia Hart Beaty, daughter of James 
William Beaty and wife, Mary Hart Beaty. 



972 JUDICIARY. 

GEORGE CLIFTON MYERS. 

George Clifton Myers, of Jackson, Clerk of the Supreme Court of 
the State of Mississippi, was born September 2, 1852, at Byhalia, Mar- 
shall County, Miss. He is the son of George Boggan Myers and wife, 
Eusebia Saxon Rodgers. His great-grandfather, Marmaduke Myers, im- 
migrated to America and settled on the eastern shore of Maryland ; after- 
wards removed to North Carolina; his maternal ancestors came from 
England and settled in South Carolina; Jas. S. Rodgers, his grandfather, 
served in the Seminole War. The father of the subject of this sketch was 
a soldier of the Confederacy; served as Captain of Company I, Tenth Mis- 
sissippi Regiment; was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel of that regiment; 
was severely wounded at Munfordsville, Kentucky ; was wounded and cap- 
tured at Jonesboro, Georgia, and imprisoned on Johnson's Island, Lake 
Erie ; after the war was elected Circuit Clerk of Marshall County ; removed 
by Ames, re-elected in 187 1 and served until 1879. Mr. Myers attended the 
Male Academy at Byhalia and Chalmers Institute, Holly Springs; studied 
law but did not practice on account of being appointed Circuit Clerk of 
Marshall County, being appointed to that office May 5, 1879, on death of 
his father, by Governor John ]\I. Stone ; elected by the people at the next 
general election and held the office continuously till September 22, 1903; 
appointed Clerk of the Supreme Court by Governor A. H. Longino Sep- 
tember 22, 1903, as successor of Hon. E. W. Brown, deceased; at the 
general election in November following received a plurality of the popular 
vote and the majority of the electoral vote; there being no election, the 
selection of a Supreme Court Clerk was thrown into the Legislature, 
which resulted in his election to that office January 12, 1904. Mr. Myers 
is a Democrat ; member of the Episcopal Church ; served as Senior War- 
den of Christ's Church at Holly Springs before coming to Jackson; is a 
Mason, Past Grand High Priest of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Mis- 
sissippi and Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery Knights Tem- 
plar; member of Hamasa Temple Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Meridian, 
Miss. ; is a Knight of Pythias and member of Knights and Ladies of Honor ; 
married at Holly Springs, Miss., June 20, 1880, to Ida Greer Bracken, 
daughter of Elvis Jett Bracken and wife, Frances Wright Bracken, of 
Holly Springs, Miss. Mr. and Mrs. Myers have four children— George 
Boggan, Clayton Hull, Elvis Lucas and Benjamin McKie. 

Mr. Myers had no opposition in the Democratic primary of August 3, 
1907, and was re-elected at the November election. 

.CIRCUIT JUDGES. 

First District — E. O. Sykes, Aberdeen; term expries March i, 1909. 

Second District — W. H. Hardy, Gulfport; term expires January i, 
1910. 

Third District — W. A. Roane, Oxford; term expires October 8, 191 1. 

Fourth District — S. M. Smith, Lexington; term expires September 23, 
1910. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 





V 



^v- 



Al 



V 










\ 



\ 




Hon. Anselm Joseph McLaurin. 



Hon. Hernando DeSoto Money. 



974 JUDICIARY. 

Fifth District — J. T. Dunn, Eupora; term expires Septemper 22, 1908. 
Sixth District — M. H. Wilkinson, Gloster; term expires August 22, 

1911. 

Seventh District — W. H. Potter, Jackson; term expires July i, 1911. 
Eighth District — J. R. Byrd, Newton; term expires April 14, 19 10. 
Ninth District — J. N. Bush, Mayersville; term expires January i, 1910. 
Tenth District — R. F. Cochran, Meridian; term expires March 15, 1908. 
Eleventh District — S. C. Cook, Clarksdale; term expires March 12, 1910. 
Twelfth District — W, H. Cook, Hattiesburg; term expires May 8, 19 10. 
Thirteenth District — R. L. Bullard, Forest; term expires June i, 19 10. 

'chancellors. 

First District — J. Q. Robins, Tupelo; term expires January i, 19 10. 

Second District — J. L. McCaskill, Brandon; term expires June 18, 1908. 

Third District — I. T. Blount; term expires January i, 191 1. 

Fourth Districit — ^J. S. Hicks, Fayette; term expires August i, 19 10. 

Fifth District — G. G. Lyell, Jackson; term expires May 10, 19 10. 
^ Sixth District — J. F. McCool, Kosciusko; term expires February i, 
1911. 

Seventh District — Percy Bell, Greenville; term expires November 14, 
1908. , 

DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. " 

First District — George T. Mitchell, Pontotoc. 
Second District — B. P. Harrison, Lucedale. 
Third District — H. D. Stephens, New Albany. 
Fourth District — R. C. McBee, Lexington. 
Fifth District — T. L. Lamb, Eupora. 
Sixth District — H. V. Wall, Summit. 
Seventh District — M. S. McNeill, Crystal Springs. 
Eighth District — J. R. East, Brandon. 
Ninth District — J. D. Thames, Vicksburg.- 
Tenth District — J. H. Currie, Meridian. 
Eleventh District — C. E. Harris, Sumner. 
Twelfth District — D. G. ^IcLaurin, Hattiesburg. 
Thirteenth District — B. E. Eaton, Laurel, 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS FROM 
MISSISSIPPI. 

HERNANDO DESOTO MONEY. 

Hernando DeSoto Money, senior United States Senator from Missis- 
sippi, was born August 26, 1S39, at his father's plantation home in Holmes 
County, Mississippi, near Lexington. He is the son of Peirson Money, a 
native of Buncombe County, North Carolina, and Tryphena (Vardaman) 
Money, whose father was Jeremiah Vardaman, an early settler of Missis- 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 975 

sippi Territory. The Moneys are English of Norman descent; the Varda- 
mans were originally from Holland. Senator Money received his early 
educational training in the country schools of Holmes County and Carroll- 
ton, Miss.; entered the University of Mississippi and was two years in 
the literary department, and entered as a law student in 1858, and was 
graduated in i860 and entered the practice of law in Carrollton. In 186 1 
he enlisted as a private in Company K (Carroll Rifles), Eleventh Mississippi 
Regiment, C. S. A., and afterward served as Sergeant-Major, Bartlett's Reg- 
iment of sixty-day troops, and First Lieutenant Company B, Twenty-eighth 
Mississippi Regiment Cavalry. After the close of the war he engaged in 
planting in the Delta and was afterwards editor of the Carrollton Con- 
servatiue. In 1873 he removed to Winona, where he was editor and 
publisher of the Advance, until 1875. In 1875 he served as Mayor of 
Winona for a few months. He was the Democratic candidate for Con- 
gress from the Third District in the election preceding the Forty-fourth 
Congress, which met December 6, 1875, and was elected. He took his 
seat as a member of the Forty-fourth Congress December 6, 1875, and 
served by re-election continuously until March 3, 1885, as a member of 
the Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses. 
After the close of his term in 1885 he did not seek re-election. After his 
retirement from Congress, Mr. Money located in Washington andengaged 
in the practice of law and in literary work, but still retaining his citizen- 
ship in Mississippi. In 1892 he was again elected to Congress and | 
served as the Representative of the Fourth District in the Fifty-third ^ ! 
and Fifty-fourth Congresses. In 1895 he announced as a candidate for -j 
the United States Senate as the successor to Senator James Z. George. | 
who had declined re-election. In the campaign which followed Mr. j 
Money advocated the free coinage of silver, and at the January, 1S96, 
session of the Legislature was elected for a six-year term, beginning in j 
1899, his principal opponents being John Allen, Robert Lowry and ! 
Charles E. Hooker. On August 14, 1897, Senator George died and j 
Governor McLaurin appointed Mr. Money to succeed him, until the \ 
meeting of the Legislature in 1898. When the Legislature met in Janu- -j 
ary he was elected to fill the unexpired term of Senator George. Senator ] 
Money took his seat in the Senate December 7, 1897, and has served j 
continuously since that time. His term expires March 3, iqii. He did ; 
not offer for re-election at the primary of August i, 11)07. His successor ""j 
will be the Hon. John tSharp Williams, who is the senatorial nominee of \ 
the Democratic party. During his service in the House Mr. Money ' 
served on the important committees of Postofficcs and Postroad (Ch.) and | 
Foreign Affairs. In the Senate he is a member of the following com-mit- • 
tees; Agriculture, Cuban Relations, Finance, Foreign Relations, Geo- 
logical Survey, Railroads and Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses 
of the Senate, which are among the great committees of the Senate. 1 
Senator Money is a Democrat ^md is a member of the Masonic and Delta 
Psi fraternities. He was married November 5, 1S63, to Claudia Boddie 
at EUislie plantation, Hinds County, Mississippi, the daughter of George 



976 - UNITED STATES SENATORS. 

and Louisa (Clark) Boddie, and a descendant of Nathan Boddie of Essex 
County, England, who came to Virginia and represented that colony in 
the Provisional Congress in 1774. Mrs. Money died in October, 1907, at 
Mississippi City, Mississippi, and is buried at Carrollton, Mississippi. 
The family of Senator Money now living are George Pierson, Hernan 
DeVaux, Mabel (Money) Kitchen and Lillian (Money) Read. The oldest 
daughter of the family, Claudia (Money) Hill, wife of Hon. W. S. Hill, 
Congressman from the Fourth Mississippi District, died in New Orleans 
in February, 1903. In 1905 Senator Money made his home on the Coast 
at Mississippi City, where he now resides. In the Senate he is ranked by 
his associates as one of the most learned and versatile Senators in the 
National Congress. 

^ ANSELM JOSEPH m'LAURIN. 

Anselm Joseph McLaurin, of Brandon, United States Senator from 
Mississippi, was bom March 26, 1848, at Brandon, Miss. He is the son 
of Lauchlin McLaurin and w^fe, Ellen Caroline TuUus. His paternal 
ancestors immigrated to America from Scotland; maternal from Wales. 
John London, his maternal great-grandfather, was a solider of the Revo- 
lution and took part in the battles of Lexington and Bunker Hill. His 
father represented Smith County in the State Legislature in 1841, 1861, 
1865 and 1875. When an infant the parents of Senator McLaurin 
removed to Smith County, where he was reared on a farm; attended the 
neighborhood schools of that county under the instruction of R. M. 
Currie, Noah Derrick, James Stingley, B. F. Lane, Margaret Chrisman, 
James Cowart and James Holiday and Thomas Fore, in Rankin County, 
until he was sixteen years of age, when he joined the Confederate Army 
and served as a private soldier in the Third Mississippi Cavalry, enlisted 
in August, 1864. After the war he entered the Summerville Institute 
and continued through the Junior year; studied law at home at night, 
after work hours; was licensed to practice law by Judge John Watts, 
July 3, 1868; located at Raleigh, Smith County, Miss., for the practice 
of his profession the first Monday in October, 1S6S; practiced there until 
March, 1876, at which date he removed to Brandon, Miss. He was 
elected District Attorney in November, 187 1; elected to the House of 
Representatives from Rankin County in November, 1879; 'was elector 
from the State at large in 1888; delegate from Rankin County to the 
Constitutional Convention- of 1890; elected United States Senator Feb- 
ruary 7, 1894, to fill out the unexpire<l term of Senator Edward C. Wal- 
thall, resigned; elected Governor in November. 1895, ^'^^ ^ term of four 
years, beginning January 21, 1896, and ending January 16, 1900; re- 
elected to the United States Senate January 16, 1900, and took his seat 
March 4, 1901; re-elected January 20, 1904, for a term of six years, to 
begin March 4, 1907. Senator McLaurin has always been a loyal Democrat 
and has served as Chairman of County and Congressional Democratic 
Executive Committees. He is a member and steward of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South; is a Royal Arch Mason, Knight of Honor, 



CONGRESSMEN. 977 

Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the World. He was married at 
Trenton, Miss., February 22, 1870, to Laura Elvira Victoria Rauch, 
daughter of John Rauch and wife, Epsilon Rauch, of Trenton, Miss. 
.Mrs. McLaurin s paternal ancestors immigrated to America from Ger- 
many; maternal from England and Germany; her father, John Rauch, 
was a scholarly theologian. Senator and Mrs. McLaurin have had born 
to them ten children, seven of whom are living: Stella (McLaurin) Berry, 
Delta (McLaurin) McLaurin, Daisy (McLaurin) Stevens, Irene (McLaurin) 
Pate, Anselm Joseph, Jean Wallace and Laura Rauch; they have lost .] 

three daughters: Laura Fostina, Sallie C. and Mary Louise (who died at | 

the age of seventeen after graduating with first honors). As a member of j 

the Constitutional Convention of 1890, Senator McLaurin advocated the | 

disfranchisement of wife-beaters, the insertion of a provision requiring 1 

the payment of a pension of at least seventy-five dollars a year to all j 

disabled, needy Confederate soldiers, the election of the judiciary by '■ 

popular vote, and in a message to the Legislature made the first recom- J 

mendation for the establishment of a textile school for the A. and >L | 

College. His term of service will expire March 3 , 1 9 1 3 . Senator McLaurin j 

is a member of the following important Senate Committees: Civil Service i 

and Retrenchment, Claims, Immigration, Indian Depredations, Interstate ] 

Commerce, Mississippi River and its Tributaries, Organization, Conduct | 

and Expenditures of the Executive Departments, and Public Lands. 1 

Senator McLaurin is an able and faithful advocate of the best interests 
of the people. 

REPRESENTATIVES 

FIRST DISTRICT. 

Counties — Aleorn, Itawamba, Lee, Lowndes, Monroe, Noxubee, Oktib- 
beha, Prentiss and Tishomingo. (Nine counties.) 

Population 1900 — 187,739. 

EZEKIEL SAMUEL CANDLER. 

Ezekiel Samuel Candler, Jr., of Corinth, Representative in Congress 
from the First Mississippi District, was born at Bellville, Hamilton 
County, Florida, January 18, 1862. He is the son of Ezekiel Samuel Cand- 
ler and wife, Julia Bevill Candler. Mr. Candler is a descendant of Wil- 
liam Candler, who was a Colonel in the Army ot the Revolution, and the 
ancestor of the Candler family of Georgia, which has been prominently 
identified with the history of that State from 1776 to the present time. 
His parents removed to Tishomingo County, Miss., when he was eight 
years old. He attended the luka Male Academy: entered the law depart- 
ment of the University of Mississippi ami was graduated Juna 30, iSSi. 
with the degree of LL. B.; began the practice of law at luka. Miss., July 
I, 1S81, with his father, under the firm name of Candler & Candler, which 
partnership still exists; removed to Corinth, Miss., January i, 1SS7, where 



- i 



CONGRESSMEN 






r 




Hon. J. S. Williams, Eighth District. 

Hon. B. G. Hvimphreys, Third District. Hon. F. A.. McLain, Seventh District. 

Hon. E. J. Bowers, Sixth District. 



CONGRESSMEN. 979 

he has since resided ; was Presidential Elector for the First Congressional 
District in 1888 on the Cleveland and Thurman ticket; was elected to 
Congress November 6, 1900, as the successor to "Private" John M. Allen, 
and re-elected in November, 1902, 1904 and 1906. Mr. Candler is a 
Democrat, and has always been a strict party man; has given active and 
faithful service on County and District Executive Committees ; is a mem- 
ber and deacon of the Baptist Church, and was for nine years moderator 
of the Tishomingo Baptist Association ; is superintendent of the Sunday- 
school at Corinth; Mason, Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias; is alternate 
Supreme Representative in the Domain of Mississippi of the last named 
order. Mr. Candler was married at Cherokee, Ala., April 26, 1883, to 
Nancy Priscilla Hazlewood, daughter of Thomas B. and Susan Hazle- 
wood, of Town Creek, Ala. Mr. and Mrs. Candler have three children: 
Julia Bevill, Susan Hazlewood and Lucia Alice. Mr. Candler was elected 
to the Fifty-eighth Congress without opposition, receiving 3,245 votes. 
He was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Congresses without 
opposition, and is a member of the Committees on Agriculture, Alcoholic 
Liquor Traffic and Expenditures in the Department of Agriculture. 

SECOND DISTRICT. 

Counties — Benton, DeSoto, Lafayette, Marshall, Panola, Tallahatchie, 
Tate, Tippah and Union. (Nine counties.) 

Population 190c — 183,795. 

THOMAS SPIGHT. 

Thomas Spight, of Ripley, Representative in Congress from the Second 

District, v/as born October 25, 1841, near Ripley, Miss. He is the son of j 

James Munford Spight and wife, Mary Rucker Spight; his maternal ^j 

ancestors came to America from Ireland; Richard D. Speight, his paternal | 

ancestor, was a delegate from North Carolina to the convention which i 

framed the Constitution of the United States. Captain Spight was -1 

reared on a farm in Tippah County, Miss., and attended the common { 

schools and Ripley Male Academy; entered Lagrange College, Tennessee, i 

in 1859; l^^t college in 1861 and enlisted in the Confederate Army as a j 

private; became Lieutenant and Captain of Company B, Thirty-fourth j 

Mississippi Regiment, before he was twenty years old, being the youngest .{ 

officer of that rank in the famous Walthall's Brigade, which was com- j 

manded by the late distinguished Senator from Mississippi; participated : 

in nearly all the battles fought by the Army of Tennessee ; he was severely -] 

wounded July 22, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia; was in command of what j 

was left of the Thirty-fourth Mississippi Regiment in April, 1S65, when 1 

he surrendered with the army under General Joseph E. Johnston at ' 
Greensboro, North Carolina; taught school after the war; studied law 

and was admitted to the bar at Ripley, Miss., in 1874. and has been in i 

active practice since that time ; represented Tippah County in the Legis- | 

lature from 1874 to 1880, and took a prominent part in the imr^^achment | 



980 CONGRESSMEN. 

of Adelbert Ames; was Presidential Elector on the Hancock ticket in 
1880; elected District xVttorney for the Third Judicial District in 1884, 
and filled that position until 1892, when he voluntarily retired; was 
elected to Congress from the Second District June i, 1898, and has served 
continuously from that date to the present time. Captain Spight is a 
Democrat and has been a prominent member of the State Democratic 
Executive Committee. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and has 
served as clerk of his Church and Association, and superintendent of the 
Sunday-school; is a Knight of Honor; was married near Ripley, Miss., 
December 12, 1865, to Mary Virginia Barnett, daughter of Albert G. and 
Frances A. Barnett, of Tippah County. Mrs. Spight died May 21, 1901, 
and on October 15, 1903, Captain Spight was again married to Mrs. 
Thida Duncan Moore. By the first marriage there are six children, viz.: 
Mattie (Spight) Hines, Mamie V., Lynn D., AUie F., Henry R. and Lillian 
Spight. Captain Spight was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth 
Congresses, and is a member of the Committees on Merchant Marine and 
Fisheries and "War Claims. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 

Counties — Bolivar, Coahoma, Holmes, Issaquena, Leflore, Quitman, 
Sharkey, Sunflower, Tunica and Washington. (Ten counties.) 

Population 1900 — 232,174. 

BENJAMIN GRUBB HUMPHREYS. 

Benjamin Grubb Humphreys, of Greenville, Representative in Con- 
gress from the Third District, was born at Lucknow Plantation, Claiborne 
County, Miss., August 17, 1865. He is the son of Benjamin Grubb Hum- 
phreys and wife, Mildred Hickman Maury. . His ancestors came to Missis- 
sippi from Virginia and Tennessee. Ralph Humphreys, his paternal great- 
grandfather, was Colonel of a Virginia regiment in the Army of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. He is also a descendant of James Wilson, of Pennsyl- 
vania, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The father of the 
subject of this sketch was Brigadier-General Benjamin Grubb Humphreys 
of the Confederate Army, and Governor of Mississippi from 1865 to 186S, 
when he was forcibly ejected from the executive residence by Federal sol- 
diers under the command of Brigadier-General Adelbert Ames, U. S. A., 
who succeeded him as military Governor. His mother is a member of 
the Maury family of Tennessee. Mr. Humphreys attended the public 
schools and the Lexington High School under the instruction of Professor 
G. W. Smith; entered the University of Mississippi in iSSo, and received 
a department diploma in 1884, having completed the Junior year; took 
first Phi Sigma medal in 1S82; studied law at the University of Missis- 
sippi in 1 89 1, but was not graduated. He engaged in mercantile pursuits, 
first as clerk and af tervvards as a traveling salesman : engaged in the mer- 
cantile business from 1887 to 1891 ; was admitted to the bar in November, 
1 891; appointed Superintendent of Education of Leflore County in Janu- 



CONGRESSMEN. 981 

ary, 1892, for a term of four years; was selected messenger by the Presi- 
dential Electors in 1892 to deliver the electoral vote of Mississippi; elected 
District Attorney for the Fourth Circuit Court District of Mississippi in 
1895 for a term of four years, and was re-elected without opposition in 
1899. When war was declared against Spain in 1898, Mr. Humphreys 
raised a company at Greenwood, Miss., and was elected First Lieutenant, 
and offered to resign his office of District Attorney in order to join the 
army, but Governor A. J. McLaurin declined to accept his resignation and 
gave him instead a leave of absence; served in the Second Mississippi 
Volunteer Infantry at Panama, Florida, under General Fitzhugh Lee; 
was a candidate for Congress in 1900; defeated by Hon. Patrick Henry; 
in 1902 was nominated without opposition in the Democratic primary and 
elected in November without opposition to the Fifty-eighth Congress. Mr. 
Humphreys is a Democrat; member and deacon of the Presbyterian 
Church; is a Mason, Knight of Pythias, Knight of Honor and Woodman -j 

of the World. Mr. Humphreys was married at Biloxi, October 9, 1889, to - ' '■ 

Louise Yerger, daughter of Major William Yerger and wife, Lucy Green, j 

of Greenville, Miss. Mrs. Humphreys is a descendant of Judge William ,i 

Yerger of the Mississippi High Court of Errors and Appeals. Mr. and | 

Mrs. Humphreys have two children, William Yerger and Mildred Maury. j 

Mr. Humphreys was elected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Congresses, j 

and is a member of the Committee on Rivers and Harbors. 4 

FOURTH DISTRICT. | 

1 

Counties — ^Attala, Calhoun, Carroll, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Clay, Gre- ^ 

nada, Montgomery, Pontotoc, Webster and Yalobusha. (Eleven coun- j 

ties.) „ . . ■' 

Population 1900 — 199,650. 

WILSON SHEDRIC HILL. 

Wilson Shedric Hill, of Winona, Representative in Congress from the 

Fourth District, was bom January 19, 1863, in Choctaw County, Miss.; 

was educated in the common schools of that section of the State ; attended 1 

i 

the University of Mississippi ; studied law at Comberland University, Leb- i 

anon, Tenn.; began its practice at Winona, Miss., in 1884, where he has \ 

since resided; was elected to the House of Representatives from Mont- *, 

gomery County in 1887, and served one tenn; elected District Attorney j 

for the Fifth Judicial District in 1891, and re-elected without opposition in i 

1895, and again in'1899 '» "^^s elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress Novem- 1 

ber 3, 1902, without opposition for nomination or election. Mr. Hill is a \ 

loyal Democrat; member of the Methodist Church, Mason, Odd Fellow, \ 

Woodman of the World and Knight of Honor. For the past fifteen years ] 
Mr. Hill has been prominent in the public affairs of Mississippi and has 

given faithful and efficient service to the people. He was re-elected to the 1 
Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Congresses and is a member of the following 
committees: Expenditures in the Interior Department, Postoffice and 

Postroads. . ■ 



982 CONGRESSMEN. 

FIRTH DISTRICT. 

. Counties — Clarke, Jasper, Kemper, Lauderdale, Leake, Neshoba, New- 
ton, Scott, Smith and Winston. (Ten counties.) 

Population 1900 — 183,066. 

ADAM MONROE BYRD. 

Adam Monroe Byrd, of Philadelphia, Representative in Congress from 
the Fifth District, was bom July 6, 1859, in Sumpter County, Alabama. 
He is the son of John Byrd and wife, Elizabeth Tann Byrd. His paternal 
ancestors removed from Georgia to Alabama; maternal from Indiana to 
the same State. Alfred Tann, his grandfather, was from Indiana, and 
served with General William Henry Harrison in his campaign against 
Tecumseh and participated in the battle of Tippecanoe, and afterwards 
became one of the pioneer settlers of Western Alabama. The father of the 
subject of this sketch was a soldier of the Confederacy and died in the 
service. Mr. Byrd attended the common schools of Neshoba County until 
twenty-one years old; entered Hiwassee College, Tennessee, for one year; 
attended Cooper Institute at Daleville, Miss., for three years, "leaving that \ 

institution six months before graduation ; entered the law school of Cum- 
berland University, Tennessee, and was graduated therefrom w4th the i 
degree of LL. B. in June, 1884; admitted to the bar; began the practice 
of law at Philadelphia, Miss., where he now resides; was Superintendent 
of Education of Neshoba County in 1887, 1888 and 1889; was State Sen- 
ator from 1889 to 1895; elected to the House of Representatives from 
Neshoba County in November, 1895; District Attorney in 1896; Chan- 
cellor from 1897 to 1903; elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress in Novem- 
ber, 1902. Mr. Byrd is a Democrat, Methodist and Mason, having taken 
the Shriner's degree; has been twice married, first to Maggie Simmons, 
December 16, 1887, who died in August, 1898; married second time to 
Mary R. Gulley, daughter of James A. Gulley and w4fe, Leola Gulley, of 
Meridian, Miss. Mr. Byrd. has two children by his first marriage, Annie 
Kate and Eddie Lee, and two by his second marriage, Lena Elizabeth and 
Adam Monroe, Jr. Mr. Byrd was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and Six- 
tieth Congresses and is a member of the following committees: Elections 
No. 2, Expenditures in the Department of Justice, Public Lands. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Counties — Covington, Greene, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Jones, 
Lawrence, Marion, Pearl River, Perry, Simpson, Wayne, Lamar and 
Jefferson Davis. (Fifteen counties.) 

Population 1900 — 152,440. 

EATON JACKSON BOWERS. 

Eaton Jackson Bowers, of Bay St. Louis, Representative in Congress 
from the Sixth District, was born June 17, 1865, at Canton, Madison Coun- 



CONGRESSMEN. 983 

ty, Miss. He is the son of Eaton Jackson Bowers and wife, Sallie Lee 
Dinkins. His ancestors came originally from North Carohna. The father 
of the subject of this sketch was a native of North CaroUna; during his 
childhood his parents removed to Hardeman County, Tennessee, where 
he was reared; was graduated from the Transylvania University at Lex- 
ington, Kentucky; studied law in the office of Judge J. W.'C. Watson at 
Holly Springs, Miss.; enlisted in the Confederate Army; was a Lieuten- 
ant in the Madison Rifles; served with Generals Van Dorn and W. H. 
Jackson until the close of the war. Mr. Bowers attended the schools of 
Canton, Miss., under the instruction of Mrs. Lou Slover and Mrs. Ann 
Webster; entered the Mississippi Military Institute at Pass Christian, 
Miss., in 1879 and continued studies until 1881 ; leaving school at the age 
of fifteen, he found employment as writer, or assistant, in the Chancery 
Clerk's office of- Madison County ; after serving in that office for a short 
time he was engaged in bookkeeping in Grenada and Canton until April 1 

13, 1883 ; studied law in the office of Judge J. W. Downs, at Canton, Miss., ; 

for three months; was admitted to the bar April 8, 1883, at the age of 
seventeen years; located in Canton, Miss., for the practice of his profes- j 

sion and remained until August, 1884, when he removed to Bay St. Louis, -i 

Miss., and formed a partnership with Col. Ben Lane Posey; was Presi- ' 

dential Elector on the Democratic ticket for the Sixth District in 1888; j 

was appointed in 1892 by Judge Niles of the Federal Court, Attorney for ■ 

the Receiver of the G. & S. I. R. R., and was thereafter general counsel ■ 

for the company until December 31, 1905, when he resigned; was Presi- ' 

dential Elector from the State at large in 1892 and 1896; elected to the : 

State Senate from the First District in 1885, and served one term of four ; 

years ; • elected to the House of Representatives from Hancock County in 
1899; nominated for Congress in 1902, over W. H. Hardy, of Perry Coun- i 

ty, and E. M. Barber, of Harrison County, and elected without opposition j 

November 3, 1902. Mr." Bowers is a Democrat and has been active in 1 

party affairs as a member of County and State Executive Committees. He ] 

is a member, trustee and steward of the Methodist Church; is a Mason, • j 

Knight Templar, Shriner, Knight of Pythias, Elk and Owl. He was 
married at Bay St. Louis, Miss., September 3, 1888, to Tallulah Gaines '< 

Posey, daughter of Ben Lane Posey and wife, Fannie B. Posey, of Bay ■ 

St. Louis. Mrs. Bowers' father was a member of the famous "Palmetto • 

Regiment," from South Carolina, in the war with Me.xico. and com- ; 

manded the company from Mobile. Ala., known as the "Red Eagles," in the -j 

Confederate Army. Mr. and Mrs. Bowers have four children; Eaton i 

Jackson, Posey Ridgely, Sallie Zoe and Samuel Holloway. Mr. Bowers \ 

was Chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee of \ 

1906. He was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth Congresses, i 

and is a member of the Committees on Public Buildings and Grounds and | 

Ventilation and Acoustics. \ 

i 



984 . CONGRESSMEN. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Counties — Adams, Amite, Claiborne, Copiah, Franklin, Jefferson, Lin- 
coln, Pike and Wilkinson. (Nine counties.) 

Population 1900 — 211,521. 

; FRANK ALEXANDER m'LAIN. 

Frank Alexander McLain, of Gloster, Representative in Congress from 
the Seventh District, was born January 29, 1852, on a farm near Liberty, 
Amite County, Miss. He is the son of Enoch Bateman McLain and wife, 
Nancy Berry hill McLain. His ancestors immigrated to America from 
Scotland and settled in Robeson County, North Carolina, in 1776 ; removed 
to Tennessee in 1803, and from thence to Amite County, Miss., in 181 2. 
The father of the subject of this sketch was a soldier of the Confederate 
Army in the cavalry under General Forrest; is a planter and merchant. 
Mr. McLain attended the public schools of Amite County; in 1879 was a 
student at Woodlawn Institute in East Felicianna Parish, La., under the 
instruction of Rev. Mr. Relyea and Rev. Samuel H. Hayden; entered the 
University of Mississippi and was graduated from that institution in June, 
1874, with the A. B. degree; was a teacher in the public schools of the 
State from 1875 to 1879, and studied law during that period; obtained 
license to practice law in September, 1879, at Liberty, Miss., and located 
there for the practice; remained until 1885, at which time he removed to 
Gloster, Miss. ; was elected to the House of Representatives from Amite 
County in 1881 for a term of two years; was elected District Attorney for 
his Judicial District in 1883, in which capacity he served three consecutive 
terms of four years each, beginning in January, 1884, and ending January, 
1896; was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1890 as Floater 
Representative from Amite and Pike Counties; retired voluntarily from 
the office of District Attorney January i, 1896, and resumed the practice of 
law at Gloster, Miss. ; was unanimously nominated by the Executive Com- 
mittee and elected without opposition, receiving every vote cast, to fill out 
the -unexpired term in the Fifty-fifth Congress of William Franklin Love, 
who died October 17, 1889; elected to the Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh 
Congress and re-elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress without opposition. 
Mr. McLain is a Democrat ; member of the Methodist Church and Knight 
of Pythias; was married at Magnolia, Miss., March 6, 1879, to Fannie 
Ann Tyler, daughter of William G. Tyler and wife, Lindsay Connally. ot 
Tylertown, Miss. Mrs. McLain died at Washington. D. C, March 13. iq.-'O. 
Mr. McLain has three children: Mary (McLain) Hines. Enoch Bateman 
and William Tyler; was married at Gloster, Miss., to Sarah Elizabeth 
Conerly, April 17, 1907. He was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth 
Congresses, and is a member of the Committee on District of Columbia 
and Pensions. 



CONGRESSMEN. 985 

EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

Counties — Hinds, Madison, Rankin, Warren and Yazoo. (Five coun- 
Population 1900 — 190,885. 

JOHN SHARP WILLIAMS. 

John Sharp Williams, of Yazoo City, Representative in Congress from 
the Eighth District, was born July 30, 1854, at Memphis, Tenn. He is the 
son of Christopher Harris Williams and wife, Annie Louise Sharp. John 
Williams, a paternal ancestor, was Lieutenant-Colonel of the Hillsboro 
Minute Men and afterwards Colonel of the Ninth North Carolina Line 
Army of the American Revolution; Christopher Harris Williams, his 
grandfather, was for ten years a member of the National House of Rep- 
resentatives from Tennessee. John M. Sharp, his maternal grandfather, 
was Captain of Company A, First Mississippi Rifles, under the command of 
Col. Jefferson Davis, in the Mexican War; the father of the subject of this 
sketch was Colonel of the Twenty-seventh Tennessee Volunteers, Confeder- 
ate Army, and was killed at the battle of Shiloh. When the city of Mem- 
phis was threatened with capture by the Federal Army, his family removed 
to his mother's home in Yazoo County, Miss. Mr. Williams attended 
the private schools of Memphis and Yazoo City, afterwards attended \ 

successively the Kentucky Military Institute near Frankfort, the Univer- j 

sity of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., the University of Virginia and the Uni- \ 

versify of Heidelberg, at Baden, Germany ; subsequently studied law under , 

Professors Minor and Southall, at the University of Virginia and in the 
law office of Harris, McKisick & Turley, in Memphis, Tennessee; was 
licensed to practice in March, 1877 ; i^ December, 187S, removed to Yazoo 
City, Miss., where he engaged in the practice of his profession and the 
varied pursuits of a cotton planter ; was a delegate to the Chicago conven- 1 

tion which nominated Cleveland and Thunnan ; was elected to the Fifty- 1 

third. Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh Congresses j 

as a Representative of the Fifth Congressional District, and elected from 
the new Eighth District to the Fifty-eighth Congress in November, 1902, j 

and in November, 1904, without opposition. Mr. Williams is a straight 
Democrat; member of the Episcopal Church; Mason, Knight of Pythias 
and Elk; was married at Livingston, Ala., October 2, 1877, to Bettie i 

Dial Webb, daughter of Dr. Robert Dickens Webb and wife, Juha Fulton { 

Webb, of Livingston, Ala. Mr. and Mrs. WiUiams have eight children: j 

Mary (Williams) Holmes, Robert Webb, John Sharp, Jr., Julia Fulton, | 

Allison Ridley, Sallie Shelby and Christopher Harris. Mr. Williams was 
the candidate of the Democratic party for Speaker of the Fifty-eighth j 

Congress and was leader of the minority on the floor of the House. He ! 

was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1904 and was 
Temporary Chairman and a member of the Committee on Resolutions of 
that convention. Mr. Williams was re-elected to the Fifty-ninth and 
Sixtieth Congresses without opposition, and is a membr of the Rules and 



986 CONGRESSMEN. 

Ways and Means Committees. He is the leader of the Democratic party 
on the floor of the House. In 1906 he announced as a candidate for the 
United States Senate to succeed Senator H. D. Money, who did not offer 
for re-election. His opponent was Gov. James K. Vardaman. In the 
Democratic primary of August i, 1907, Mr. Williams was nominated as 
the party candidate for United States Senator. He opposed taking the 
race question into the field of national politics, as proposed by his oppo- 
nent by his advocacy of the immediate repeal of the Fifteenth Amend- 
ment and modification of the Fourteenth. Mr. Williams is regarded by 
all parties as one of the ablest and best equipped men in pubHc life in 
the United States. 



W* W m m, i II " ■r » i> ,aUi^'»,^.*»':^j^. P" 



CONGRESSMEN 





Hon. E, S. Candler, Jr.. First District. 



Hon. W S. HQl. Fourth District 





Hon. Thomas Spight, Second District. 



Hon. A. M. Byrd. Fifth District. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



REPRESENTATION, 

The legislative power of this State shall be vested in the Legislature^ 
which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives. (Con- 
stitution, Sec. 33.) 

ARTICLE Xm. 

APPORTIONMENT. 

Section 254. The number of Representatives in the Lower House of 
the Legislature shall be one hundred and thirty-three, to be apportioned 
as follows: 

First. — The counties of Choctaw, Covington, Greene, Hancock, Issa- 
quena, Jones, Lawrence, Leflore, Marion, Neshoba, Pearl River, Perry, 
Quitman, Scott, Sharkey, Simpson, Smith, Sunflower, Tallahatchie, Tisho- 
mingo, Tunica, Wayne and Webster, each shall have one Representative. 

Second. — The counties of Alcorn, Amite, Attala, Bolivar, Calhoun, 
Carroll, Chickasaw, Clay, Coahoma, DeSoto, Kemper, Lafayette, Madison, 
Newton, Pike, Pontotoc, Prentiss, Rankin, Tate, Union, Wilkinson and 
Yalobusha each shall have two Representatives. 

Third. — The counties of Copiah, Holmes, Marshall, Monroe, Noxubee, 
Panola, Warren and Washington each shall have three Representatives. 

Fourth. — The counties of Franklin and Lincoln each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Fifth. — The counties of Tippah and Benton each shall have one Rep- 
resentative and a floater between them. 

Sixth. — The counties of Claiborne and Jefferson each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

• Seventh. — The counties of Clarke and Jasper each shall have one Rep- 
resentative and a floater between them. 

Eighth. — ^The counties of Grenada and Montgomery each shall have 
one Representative and a floater between them. 

Ninth. — The counties of Leake and Winston each shall have one Rep- 
resentative and a floater between them. 

Tenth. — The counties of Harrison and Jackson each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Eleventh. — The county of Yazoo shall have three Representatives, and 
the county of Hinds shall have three Representatives, and they shall have 
a floater between them. 

(988) - 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 989 

Twelfth. — The county of Lauderdale shall have three Representatives, 
one to be elected by the city of Meridian, one by the county outside the 
city limits, and one by the whole county, including Meridian. 

Thirteenth. — The county of Adams, outside of the city of Natchez, shall 
have one Representative, and the city of Natchez one Representative. 

Fourteenth. — The county of Lowndes shall have three Representatives, 
two of whom shall be elected by that part of the county east of the Tom- 
bigbee River, and one by that portion of the county west of said river. 

Fifteenth. — The county of Oktibbeha shall have two Representatives, 
one of whom shall be elected by that portion of the county east of the line 
running north and south between ranges thirteen and fourteen, and the 
other by that portion of the county west of said line. 

Sixteenth.- — The county of Lee shall have two Representatives, the 
county of Itawamba one, and a floater between them. 

Seventeenth. — In counties divided into legislative districts, any citizen 
of the county eligible for election to the House of Representatives shall be 
eligible to represent any district thereof. 

(The counties of Lamar, Forrest and Jefferson each have one Repre- 
sentative.) i 

THE SENATE. \ 

Sec. 255. The number of Senators shall be forty-five, and are appor- 1 

tioned as follows: j 

First. — The counties of Hancock, Harrison and Jackson shall consti- J 

tute the First District and elect one Senator. * 

Second. — The counties of Wayne, Jones. Perry and Greene the Second \ 

District, and elect one Senator. The county of Forrest has been added J 
to the Second District. - j 

Third. — The counties of Jasper and Clarke the Third District, and elect J 

one Senator. 1 

Fourth. — The counties of Simpson, Covington, Marion and Pearl River ] 

the Fourth District, and elect one Senator. The county of Lamar has -j 

been added to the Fourth District. 1 

Fifth. — The counties of Rankin and Smith the Fifth District, and elect J 

one Senator. ' j 

Sixth. — The counties of Pike and Franklin the Sixth District, and elect | 

one Senator. ■..^^•^ j 

Seventh. — The counties of Amite and Wilkinson the Seventh District, J 

and elect one Senator. J 

Eighth. — The counties of Lincoln and Lawrence the Eighth District, I 

and elect one Senator. The county of Jefferson Davis has been added to ] 
the Eighth District. 

Ninth. — The county of Adams the Ninth District, and elect one Senator. 

Tenth. — The counties of Claiborne and Jefferson the Tenth District 
and elect one Senator. 

- Eleventh. — The county of Copiah the Eleventh District, and elect one 
Senator. 



990 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



' Twelfth. — The counties of Hinds and Warren the Twelfth District, and 
elect one Senator each and a Senator between them, to be chosen from 
the counties alternately, beginning with Hinds. 

Thirteenth. — The counties of Scott and Newton the Thirteenth Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Fourteenth.- — The county of Lauderdale the Fourteenth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Fifteenth. — The counties of Kemper and Winston the Fifteenth Dis- 
trict, and elect one Senator. 

Sixteenth. — The county ol Noxubee the Sixteenth District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Seventeenth. — The counties of Leake and Neshoba the Seventeenth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Eighteenth. — The county of Madison the Eighteenth District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Nineteenth. — The county of Yazoo the Nineteenth District, and elect 
one. Senator. 

Twentieth. — The counties of Sharkey and Issaquena the Twentieth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty- fir St. — The county of Holmes the Twenty-first District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenty-second. — The county of Attala the Twenty-second District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-third. — The counties of Oktibbeha and Choctaw the Twenty- 
third District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fourth. — The counties of Clay and Webster the Twenty-fourth 
District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fifth. — The county of Lowndes the Twenty-fifth District, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenty-sixth. — The counties of Carroll and Montgomery the Twenty- 
sixth District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-seventh. — The counties of Leflore and Tallahatchie the Twenty- 
seventh District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-eighth. — The counties of Yalobusha and Grenada the Twenty- 
eighth District, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty- ninth. — The counties of Washington and Sunflower the Twenty- 
ninth District. The county of Washington shall elect one Senator, and 
the counties of Washington and Sunflower a Senator between them. 

Thirtieth. — The county of Bolivar the Thirtieth District, and elect one 
Senator. 

Thirty-first. — The counties of Chickasaw, Calhoun and Pontotoc the 
Thirty-first District, and elect two Senators. Both Senators shall at no 
time be chosen from the same county. 

Thirty-second. — The county of Lafayette the Thirty-second District, 
and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-third. — The county of Panola the Thirty-third District, and elect 
one Senator. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 991 

« 

Thirty-fourth. — The counties of Coahoma, Tunica and Quitman the 
Thirty-fourth District, and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-fifth. — The county of DeSoto the Thirty-fifth District, and elect 
one Senator. 

Thirty-sixth. — The counties of Union, Tippah, Benton, Marshall and 
Tate the Thirty-sixth District, and elect three Senators. The counties of 
Tate and Benton shall be entitled to one, the counties of Union and Tip- 
pah one, and the county of Marshall one. 

Thirty-seventh. — The counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn and Prentiss the 
Thirty-seventh District, and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-eighth. — The counties of Monroe, Lee and Itawamba the Thirty- 
eighth District, and elect two Senators, one of whom shall be a resident 
of the county of Monroe and the other a resident of Lee or Itawamba 
counties. 

Sec. 256. The Legislature may, at the first session after the State cen- 
sus of 1895, and decennially thereafter, make a new apportionment of 
Senators and Representatives. At each apportionment each county then 
organized shall have at least one Representative. New counties after- 
wards created shall be represented as may be provided by law until the 
next succeeding apportionment. The counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn, 
Prentiss, Lee, Itawamba, Tippah, Union, Benton, Marshall, Lafayette, 
Pontotoc, Monroe, Chickasaw, Calhoun, Yalobusha, Grenada, Carroll, 
Montgomery, Choctaw, Webster, Clay, Lowndes and Oktibbeha, or the 
territory now composing them, shall together never have less than forty- 
four Representatives. The counties of Attala, Winston, Noxubee, Kem- 
per, Leake, Neshoba, Lauderdale, Ne-'^'ton, Scott; Rankin, Clarke, Jasper, j 
Smith, Simpson, Copiah, Franldin, Lincoln, Lawrence, Covington, Jones, 4 
Wayne, Greene, Perry, Marion. Pike, Pearl River, Hancock, Harrison and J 
Jackson, or the territory now composing them, shall together never have • 
less than forty-four Representatives ; nor shall the remaining counties of 
the State, or the territory now composing them, ever have less than 
forty-four Representatives. A reduction in the number of Senators and 
Representatives may be made by the Legislature if the same be uniform 
in each of the three said divisions ; but the number of Representatives shall 
not be less than one hundred, nor more than one hundred and thirty- 
three ; nor the number of Senators less than thirty, nor more than forty- 3 
five. -! 
(1869, Art. IV, Sees. 34 and 35.) 



i 



992 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

STATE SENATORS, SEVExNTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 

OFFICERS OF THE SENATE. 

President Lieutenant-Governor Manship 

President pro tern John L. Hebron 

Secretary- Frank Roberson 

Assistant Secretary L. F. Chiles 

Sergeant-at-Arms Edgar F ranklin 

Doorkeepers T. £). Roberts and H. J. Thornton 

Postmistress Miss Anita Perkins 

Stenographers -.Mrs. C. A. Richardson, Fred Yerger and Miss Eugenia 

Davis. 
Pages. -Dean Hebron, Paul Sanders, Leonard Fitzgerald, Edward 
Gr.\dy Franklin, Troy McGeher and Clyde Breland. 



senators. 

First District. — Hancock, Harrison, Jackson— rrW. T. McDonald, Bay 
St. Louis. 

Second District. — Wayne, Jones, Perry, Greene — ^W. W. West, Richton. 

Third District. — Jasper, Clarke — Sam Whitman, Bay Springs. 

Fourth District. — Simpson, Covington, Marion, Pearl River, Lamar — 
Theo. G. Bilbo, PoplarviUe. 

Fifth District. — Rankin, Smith — W. T. Simmons, Raleigh. 

Sixth District. — Pike, Franklin — M. C. McGehee, Little Springs. 

Seventh District. — Amite, Wilkinson — W. F. Tucker, Woodville. 

Eighth District. — Lincoln, Lawrence — F. M. Bush, New Hebron.- 

Ninth District. — Adams — Charles F. Engle, Natchez. 

Tenth District. — Claiborne, Jefferson — J. S. Logan, Fayette. 

Eleventh District. — Copiah — E. A. Rowan, Wesson. 
• Twelfth District — Hinds, Warren — W. K. McLaurin, Vicksburg; Clay- 
ton D. Potter, Jackson; J. R. McDowell, Jackson. 

Thirteenth District. — Scott, Newton — G. H. Banks, Newton. 

Fourteenth District. — Lauderdale — -John A. Bailey, Bailey. 

Fifteenth District. — Kemper, Winston — J. R. Key, Rio. 

Sixteenth District. — Noxubee — ^Walter Price, Prairie Point. 

Seventeenth District. — Leake, Neshoba — R. L. Breland, Philadelphia. 

Eighteenth District. — Madison — E. B. Harrell, Canton. 

Nineteenth District. — Yazoo — W. D. Gibbs, Bentonia. 

Twentieth District — Sharkey, Issaquena — H. P. Parish, Mayersville. 

Twenty-first District. — Holmes — S. N. Sample, Ebenezer. 

Twenty-second District. — Attala — Wiley Sanders, Kosciusko. 

Ticcnty-third District — Oktibbeha, Choctaw — J. Lera Seawright, Acker- 
man. 

Twenty-fourth District. — Clay, Webster — F. G. Barry, West Point. 

Twenty- fifth District. — M. H. Frankhn, Columbus. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 993 

Tuettty-stxth District. — Carroll, Montgomery — Lee McMillan, Carroll- 

Twenty-seventh District. — Leflore, Tallahatchie — R. V. Pollard, Green- 
wt kkI . 

Tu'cnty-eightk District. — Yalobusha, Grenada — F. H. Harper, Grenada. 

Twenty-ninth District. — Washington, Sunflower — J. L. Hebron, Green- 
ville: Thos. R. Baird, Indianola. 

Thirtieth District. — Bolivar — J. C. Burrus, Benoit. 

Thirty-first District. — Chickasaw, Calhoun, Pontotoc — C. E. Franklin, 
Pontotoc; J. J. Adams, Pittsboro. 

Thirty-second District. — Lafayette — G. R. Hightower, Oxford (resigned 
January 25, 1908); R. A. Dean. 

Thirty-third District. — Panola — C. B. Vance, Batesville. 

Thirty -fourth District. — Coahoma, Tunica, Quitman — B. D. Simpson, 
Marks. 

Thirty-fifth District. — DeSoto — G. L. Darden, Hernando. 

T hirty-sixth District. — Union, Tippah, Benton, Marshall, Tate — W. J 
East, Senatobia; Hugh K. Mahon, Holly Springs; S. Joe Owen, New 
Albany. 

Thirty-seventh District. — Tishomingo, Alcorn, Prentiss — J. A. Cun- 
ningham, Booneville. 

Thirty-eighth District. — Monroe, Lee, Itawamba — W. D. Anderson, 
Tupelo; G. J. Leftwich, Aberdeen. 



SENATE STANDLNG COMMITTEES. 

Rules — Lieutenant-Governor Manship; President pro tern Hebron; 
Stmators McDonald, Leftwich, Franklin (3i,st District), Price, Sanders, 

McMillan. J 

Constitution — Senators Mahon, Adams, Whitman, Tucker, Logan, 1 

Bush, McDowell. ] 

Judiciary — Senators Anderson, McDonald, Engle, Baird, Leftwich, J 

Sea Wright, Parish, McLaurin, Potter, Mahon, Tucker, Bilbo, West, Barry, | 

Simp.son, East, Pollard, Harrell, Banks, Whitman. '-j 

binunce — Senators Sample, Cunningham, Price, Franklin (25th Dis- .\ 

trict), Hightower. Vance. Bailey, Engle, McGehee, Bush, Burrus, Hebron, j 

Tucker, Sanders. Gibbs, Franklin (31st District). i 

Local and Private Legislation — Senators Bilbo, Engle, SeawTight, \ 

Breland. Adams. \ 

Agriculture. Conmierce and Manufactures — Senators Bailey, McGehee. i 

U'est. Hightower, McMillan, Harper, Bush, Potter. Barry. Breland. ] 

Public Educativn—i^^nutors Simmons, Cunningham, Breland. Banks, ] 

Parish, Haq.ier, Darden, Owen, Bailey. j 

Public U'orA's-- Senators Banks, Key, Logan, Owen, McMillan. j 

Prtn/mg— Senators Sanders, Franklin (31st District), Whitman. Dar- \ 
den, Simmons. 
32 



994 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Railroad and Franchises — Senators Gibbs, Owen, Harrell, Barry, 
Cunningham, Franklin (25th District), Tucker. 

Claims — Senators Cunningham, Vance, Parish, Franklin (31st Dis- 
trict), Rowan, Burrus, Anderson. 

Military — Senators Tucker, Potter, Darden, Key, Owen. 

Federal Relations — Senators Barry, McMillan, Sample, East, Baird. 

County Affairs — Senators High tower, Simpson, Franklin (31st Dis- 
trict), Gibbs, Key, Rowan, Burrus. 

Immigration — Senators Harrell, Owen, Bush, West, Adams, Vance, 
Bailey. 

Registration and Elections — Senators Seawright, Harper, East, West, 
Logan, Breland, Sample. 

Unfinished Business — Senators Baird, Darden, Hebron. 

Banks and Banking — Senators McDowell, Mahon, Vance, McGehee, 
Whitman. 

Contingent Expenses — Senators Price, Bush, Pollard. 

Penitentiary and Prisons — Senators Engle, Sample, McGehee, Rowan, 
Logan, Pollard, Baird, Whitman, Leftwich. 

Humane and Benevolent Institutions — Senators Potter, Rowan, Cun- 
ningham, Sanders, Burrus, Mahon, Franklin (25th District). 

Public Lands — Senators McGehee, Key, McMillan, Simpson, East, 
Leftwich, Adams. 

Corporations — Senators McDonald, Parish, Pollard, Logan, Tucker, 
Whitman, Anderson. 

' Levees — Senators Hebron, Parish, McLaurin, Pollard, Burrus, Simp- 
son, Gibbs. 

Engrossed Bills — Senators Franklin (31st District), Sanders, East, 
Harper, Bilbo. 

Public Health and Quarantine — Senators Rowan, Simmons, Bailey, 
Price, Seawright, Hightower, Darden. 

Temperance — Senators Leftwich, Sample, Engle, McDowell, Price, 
Simpson, Sanders, Rowan. 

Pensions — Senators Vance, Barry, Bailey, Banks, Logan, McDonald, 
Adams. 

Insurance — Senators McLaurin, McDonald, Key, Harrell, Gibbs, 
McMillan, Franklin (25th District). 



SENATE JOINT COMMITTEES. 

Executive Contingent Fund — Senators Pollard, Potter, Simmons. 

Library — Senators Bush, McMillan, Leftwich. 

Enrolled Bills — Senators Darden, Tucker, Mahon, Breland, Simmons. 

To Investigate State Offices — Senators Breland, Harper, West, Banks, 
Baird, Anderson, Harrell. 

University atid Colleges — Senators Franklin (25th District), Simmons, 
McDowell, Seawright, Hightower, Franklin (31st District). 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 995 

COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS. 

Adams — Constitution, Local and Private Legislation, Immigration, 
Public Lands, Pensions. 

Anderson — Judiciary (Chairman), Claims, Corporations, To Investi- 
gate State Offices. 

Bailey — Finance, Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures (Chair- 
man), Public ^Education, Immigration, Public Health and Quarantine, 
Pensions. 

Baird — Judiciary, Federal Relations, Unfinished Business (Chairman), 
Penitentiary and Prisons, To Investigate State Offices. 

Banks — Judiciary, Public Education, Public Works (Chairman), 
Pensions, To Investigate State Offices. 

Barry — Judiciary, Agriculture, Commerce and Manufacture, Rail- 
roads and Franchises, Federal Relations (Chairman), Pensions. 

Bilbo — Judiciary, Local and Private Legislation (Chairman), En- J 

grossed Bills. \ 

Breland — Local and Private Legislation, Agriculture, Commerce and 
Manufacture, Public Education,- Registration and Elections, Enrolled 3 

Bills, To Investigate State Offices (Chairman). ] 

Burrus — Finance, Claims, County Affairs, Humane and Benevolent ! 

Institutions, Levees. ] 

Bush — Constitution, Finance, Agriculture, Commerce and Manu- j 

facture. Immigration, Library (Chairman), Contingent Expenses. 1 

Cunningham — Finance, Public Education, Railroads and Franchises, 
Claims (Chairman), Humane and Benevelont Institutions. j 

Darden — Public Education, Printing, Military, Unfinished Business, | 

Enrolled Bills (Chairman), Public Health and Quarantine. i 

Dean — Finance, Universities and Colleges, Agriculture, Commerce 1 

and Manufactures, County Affairs, Public Health and Quarantine. i 

East — Judiciary, Federal Relations, Registration and Elections, Pub- j 

lie Lands, Engrossed Bills. 'I 

Engle — Judiciary, Finance, Temperance, Local and Private Legis- j 

lation. Penitentiary and Prisons (Chairman). j 

Farish — Judiciary, Public Education, Claims, Corporations, Levees. ] 

Franklin of 25th District — Finance, Railroads and Franchises, j 

University and Colleges (Chairman), Humane and Benevolent Institu- I 

tions. Insurance. J 

Franklin of 31st District — Rules, Finance, Printing, Claims, County \ 

Affairs, Engrossed Bills (Chairman), University and Colleges. | 

GiBBs — Railroads and Franchises (Chairman), County Affairs, Levees, ,-; 

Insurance, Finance. ; 

Ha rrell— Judiciary ; Railroads and Franchises, Immigration (Chair- 
man), Insurance, To Investigate State Offices. 

Harper — Engrossed Bills, To Investigate State Offices, Agriculture, 
Commerce and Manufactures, Public Education, Registration and Elections. j 

Hebron — Rules, Finance, Unfinished Business, Levees (Chairman). • 

Hightower — Public Health and Quarantine, University and Colleges, 
Finance, Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures, County Affairs j 

(Chairman) . 1 



996 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Key — Public Lands, Insurance, Public Works, Military, County Affairs. 
Leftwich — Rules, Judiciary, Temperance (Chairman), Penitentiary 
and Prisons, Public Land, Library. 

Logan — Constitution, Public Works, Registration and Elections, 
Penitentiary and Prisons, Corporations, Pensions. 

Mahon — Constitution "(Chairman), Judiciary, Enrolled Bills, Banks 
and Banking, Humane and Benevolent Institutions. 

McDonald — Rules, Judiciary, Corporations (Chairman), Insurance, 
Pensions. 

McDowell — Constitution, Banks and Banking (Chairman), Temper- 
ance, University and Colleges. 

McGehee — Finance, Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures, Banks 
and Banking, Penitentiary and Prisons, Public Lands (Chairman). 
McLaurin— Judiciary, Levees, Insurance (Chairman). 
McMillan — Rules, Insurance, Public Lands, Agriculture, Commerce 
and' Manufactures, Public Works, Federal Relations, Library. 

Owen — Public Education, Public Works, Railroads and Franchises, 
Military, Immigration. 

Pollard — Judiciary, Contingent Expenses, Penitentiary and Prisons, 
Corporations, Levees, Executive Contingent Fund (Chairman). 

Potter — Judiciary, Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures, Mili- 
tary, Executive Contingent Fund, Humane and Benevolent Institutions 
(Chairman) . 

Price — Rules, Finance, Contingent Expenses (Chairman), Public 
Health and Quarantine, Temperance. 

Rowan — Penitentiary and Prisons, Temperance, Humane and Benev- 
olent Institutions, County Affairs, Public Health and Quarantine (Chair- 
man) . 

Sample — Finance (Chairman), Penitentiary and Prisons, Registra- 
tion and Elections, Temperance, Federal Relations. 

Sanders — Rules, Finance, Printing (Chairman), Humane and Benev- 
olent Institutions, Engrossed Bills, Temperance. 

Seawright — Local and Private Legislation, Judiciary, University and 
Colleges, Registration and Elections (Chairman), Public Health and 
Quarantine. 

Si.MPsoN — Judiciar>^ County Affairs, Levees, Public Lands, Tem- 
perance. 

Simmons — Public Education (Chairman), Printing, Public Health and 
Quarantine, Executive Contingent Fund, Enrolled Bills, University and 
Colleges. 

Tucker — Constitution, Judiciary, Finance, Railroads and Franchises. 
Military (Chairman), Enrolled Bills, Corporations. 

Vance — Finance, Claims, Immigration, Banks and Banking, Pensions 
(Chairman). 

West — Judiciary, To Investigate State Offices, Agriculture, Com.merce 
and Manufactures, Immigration, Registration and Elections. 

Whitman — Constitution, Judiciary, Printing Penitentiary and Pri- 
sons, Corporations. 



SKETCHES OF SENATORS. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Hancock, Harrison and Jackson Counties. 

WILL TATE McDonald, of Bay St. Louis, was bom 
October lo, 1862, in Tippah County, Miss., the son of James 
McLeod McDonald and wife, Sarah C. (Prather) McDonald. 
His paternal ancestors were Scotch, those on his mother's 
Mde came from England to Maryland in the first half of the 
eighteenth century. Mr. McDonald attended the academy 
at Ashland, Miss., under Professor Laughton and other teach- 
ers; was a student at the Southwertem Baptist University at 
Jackson. Tenn., from 1877 to 1880, then entered the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi, completed the law course there and 
took his degree in 1882. In July of that year he began law 
practice at Ashland and resided there for sixteen years, mov- 
ing in 1898 to Bay St. Louis. Mr. McDonald was Floater 
Representative from Benton and Tippah Coimties in 1886; 
United States Postoffice Inspector, 188 7-1 889; member of 
Constitutional Convention from Benton Cotmty, 1890; was 
State Senator Thirty-sixth District, 1896-1898; was Circuit 
Judge of the Second District September, 1903, to January, 
1906, resigning to renew his law practice; in 1907, Senator 
from First District. He is a Democrat, and has served on 
county and other committees of his party; is a Mason and 
is now Worshipful Master of his Lodge. He was married 
November 25, 1882, at Bolivar, Tenn., to Lena Sondheim, 
daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Rutledge Sondheim 
of Marion, Ala. Senator and Mrs. McDonald have four 
children : Vance Rutledge McDonald and Prather Sondheim 
McDonald, both of Purvis;. William Percy McDonald, of 
University, Miss., and Pauline Elizabeth McDonald, Bay 
St. Louis. 




Will Tate McDonald. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



Wayne, Jones, Perry and Greene Counties. 

WILLIAM WARREN WEST, of Richton, Perry County. 
was bom August 19, 1880, at Henderson, Wayne County, 
Miss. He is the son of David Braswell West and vdfe, Mary 
Jane (Dykes) West. His immediate ancestors were native 
Mississippians. Mr. West attained his early education in a 
little log cabin schoolhouse in Southwest WayTie County, his 
first teacher was his stepmother, Martha A. Finlay, who 
had married his father in 1885; his second teacher was Col. 
P. S. Layton, an old Confederate officer. He completed his 
higher education at Lochart Male and Female Institute in 
1902; entered Millsaps College Law Department, where he 
was graduated with degree of LL.B. in 1904; began practice 




William Warren' West. 



998 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 



the same year at Richton, where he has been ever since. He 
is a Democrat, has held no poHtical office previous to his 
late election as State Senator; is a Baptist, a member of the 
A. F. and A. M. Lodge and has held the office of Noble 
Grand in the Order of Odd FeDows. He was married May 
as, 1905, at Morriston, to Zella Mae Morris, daughter of 
Franklin Marion Morris and wife, Elizabeth Morris. His 
wife's father has served as member of the Mississippi Legis- 
lattire from Perry County. 




Samuel Whitman. Jr. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 
Jasper and Clarke Counties. 

SAMUEL WHITMAN, JR.. of Bay Springs, Miss., was 
bom July 13, 1866, at Enterprise, Clarke County, Miss., the 
son of Samuel Whitman and Lucille (Ferguson) Whitman. 
Samuel Whitman was Lieutenant of cavalry in the Con- 
federate Army. He represented Jasper County in the Lower 
House of the Mississippi Legislature, sessions of 1884 and 
1890. His father, Samuel Whiitman, was a resident of 
Marion, Perry- County, Alabama. The paternal ancestors 
of Samuel Whitman, Jr., were of English descent; maternal 
of Scotch. He received his early educational training at the 
schools of Enterprise, Fellowship and Rose Hill, and after- 
wards attended the Southern University at Greensboro, Ala., 
where he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
winning the society oratorical contest in 1891. He read 
law under Judge Stone Deavours at Paulding, Miss., in 1899, 
and was admitted to the practice in 1900; was elected to 
the State Senate November 5, 1907, to represent the Third 
District. Mr. Whitman is a Democrat; member of the 
Methodist Church and of the fraternal orders of Woodmen 
of the World and Columbian Woodmen. He married May 
Stanley, of Lexington, Miss., December 18. 1895, daughter 
of Rev. E. P. Stanley and Lenora (Hooker) Stanley. Mrs. 
Whitman's maternal grandfather was Richard Hooker, of 
Holmes County, Miss., whose wife was Nancy Nail. Her 
paternal grandfather was Edward Parker Stanley, of English 
ancestry. His wife was .\nna Rice. Senator and Mrs. 
Whitman have eight children: Lucille, Edith. Aline, Samuel, 
Edward Stanley, Thelma. Lenora and Noel Sydney, bom 
Januaiy 29, 1908. 




Theodore Gilmore Bilbo. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Simpson, Covington, Marion, Pearl River and Lamar 
Counties. 

THEODORE GILMORE BILBO, of PoplarviUe, .Miss... 
son of James Oliver Bilbo and wife, Beedy (Wallace) Bilbo, 
was bom October 13. 1877, at Juniper Grove. Pean River 
(formerly Hancock) County. Miss. He is of Scotch-Irish 
descent, both paternal and maternal prrandparents having 
first settled in the Carolinas and removing later to Missis- 
sippi. His parents were native Mississippians; mother was 
the daughter of Elias Wallace and wife. Patsy (Wheat) 
Wallace. James Oliver Bilbo was a soldier in the Confed- 



' :'^:.:W 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



999 



erate Army; is Vice-President of the National Bank at Pop- 
larville and is also engaged in stock raising; his parents, 
Washington Bilbo and Priscilla (Smith) Bilbo, were resi- 
dents of Mississippi. Theodore G. Bilbo received his early 
education in the public schools of Pearl River County and in 
the Poplarville High School, after which he spent three years, 
1897-1900, at the University of Nashville, Peabody Normal 
College, holding a scholarship during two years of that time. 
He entered the Law Department of Vanderbilt University, 
1905, where he continued until 1907; was admitted to 
practice by the Supreme Court of Tennessee June, 1906, and 
located in the city of Nashville, where he remained until the 
summer of 1907, when he removed to Poplarville, Miss. He 
was elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. He is a 
Democrat; member of the Baptist Church and member of 
the fraternal orders of Odd Fellows, Woodmen of the World. 
Knights of Pythias and Elks. Senator Bilbo has been twice 
married, his first wife was Lillian Selita Herrington, daughter 
of C. A. Herrington and wife, Rebecca Bond Herrington. 
After her death he married Lida Ruth Gaddy, daughter of 
James Henry Gaddy and wife, Mattie (Bufkin) Gaddy. They 
have one child, Jessie Forest. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 
Rankin and Smith Counties. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR SIMMONS, of Raleigh, was bom 
November 25, 1873. near Montrose, Jasper County, Miss., the 
son of John T. Simmons and wife, Mariah E. (Sartor) Sim- 
mons. His paternal ancestors came from South CaroUna; 
his mother's father, Captain Augustus Sartor, was an officer 
in the Seminole War. His father, John T. Simmons, repre- 
sented Smith County in the Mississippi Legislature in 1892- 
94. His paternal grandfather, Richard Simmons, was Tax 
Assessor and Sheriff of Jasper County. The subject of this 
sketch attended the public schools of Jasper County, was a 
student at Montrose High School imder Judge Stone Dea- 
vours, and at Sylvarena High School under Professor W. S. 
Huddleston; had no opportunity for collegiate or professional 
education. He taught school in Smith and Jasper Counties 
was County Superintendent of Education in 1899 and re- 
elected in 1903; through his influence the citizens of Smith 
County were induced to extend their school term six months 
by local taxation. After teaching some years Mr. Simmons 
adopted the occupation of farming; was elected to the State 
Senate November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat; was a mem- 
ber of Congressional E.xecutive Committee in 1900. and of the 
Senatorial Executive Committee in 1903. He is a Baptist, 
a member of the Masonic Order, of the Woodmen of the 
World and of the Farmer's Educational and Co-operative 
Union of America. He was married February 24, 1898, at 
Louin, Miss., to Nora Smith, daughter of William L. Smith 
and wife, Octavia Land Smith. Senator and Mrs. Simmons 
have four children: William Van Amberg. Ruth. Grace and 
Myrl. 




William Taylor Simmons. 



1000 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Micajah Cicero McGehee.] 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 
Pike and Franklin Counties. 

MICAJAH CICERO McGEHEE, of Little Springs, was 
bom August IS, 1866, at that place, the son of James Madison 
McGehee and wife, Rebecca Ann (Jones) McGehee. His 
paternal ancestors came from Scotland to Virginia in 1607, 
and the family, during the following century, came to Georgia. 
His grandfather, James McGehee, emigrated from Georgia 
to Amite County, Miss., in 1817. where James Madison Mc- 
Gehee was bom; the latter moved to Franklin County in 
1847, lived to become one of the most honored citizens of 
his commimity; served four years in the Confederate Army; 
raised a family of seven sons and three daughters and lived 
to see them all grown and married. M. C. McGehee obtained 
his early education at the public schools of Little Springs, 
and also attended Mississippi College later. He has been a 
planter all his life, having worked more or less on his father's 
farm till he was twenty years of age, when he began planting 
<m his own account; was elected to the State Senate Novem- 
ber s, 1907. He is a Democrat; served as Chairman of his 
County Executive Committee a number of years; is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church, of Woodmen of the World and of 
the Knights of Honor. Senator McGehee has always been 
active in every movement for the good of his community, is 
a strong supporter of public education and is now Vice- 
President of the Bank of MeadviUe. He has been married 
twice — first in 1886 to Lizzie E. Anderson, who died in 1890; 
the second time, November 16, 189a, he married Ella Lump- 
kin, at her father's home near Smithdale. She was the 
daxighter of Daniel Rayford Lumpkin and w4fe, Sarah May 
Ltimpkin; her grandfather came from Virginia to Missis- 
sippi, one of the first settlers of Amite County, and served 
in the Mexican War, Mr. McGehee had two children by 
his first marriage, Alice Louise and Pat Henry, and four by 
his second marriage: Prentiss Tracy, Dewey, Ruth Modena 
and Micajah C, Jr. 




William Feimster Tucker. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Amite and Wilkinson Counties. 

WILLIAM FEIMSTER TUCKER, of Woodville. was 
bom January 4, 1869, at Okolona, Miss., and is the son of 
William Feimster Tucker and wife. Martha (Shackleford) 
Tucker. His paternal ancestors came to America from the 
Island of Bermuda; maternal from Wales. The father of 
the subject of this Sketch was a Brigadier-General in the 
Confederate Army from Mississippi. Mr. Tucker attended 
the primary schools of Chickasaw County; entered the 
University of Mississippi and pursued studies two years; 
was at National Normal University, Lebanon. Ohio, one year; 
was graduated from the Law School of Cumberland Uni- 
versity, Lebanon, Tenn., in 1891, with the degree of LL.B.; 
began the practice of law at Woodville, Miss., in 1S91; 
elected to the House of Representatives from Wilkinson 
Cotinty, in 1899, and re-elected November 3, 1903; elected 
to the State Senate November s. XQO?- Mr- Tucker is a 



;;fjOI 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1001 



Democrat; member of Methodist Church and Knights of 
Pythias, and a Trustee of the University of Mississippi; \vas 
married July 25, 1893, to Lillian Van Huff, daughter of 
Martin Van Buren Huff and wife, Olivia Ratcliff, of Wood- 
ville. Miss. Senator and Mrs. Tucker have six children. 
Clay Bramlette, Henr>' Shackleford, Olivia Ratcliff. Martha 
Josephine, William Feimster, Jr., and Lillian. In the House 
of 1904-1908 Mr. Tucker was a member of the following 
committees: Appropriations, Corporations, Federal Relations 
and Claims. 



EIGHTH DISTRICT. 
Lincoln and Lawrence Counties. 

FRED MARSHALL BUSH, of New Hebron, was bom 
July 19, 1880, at Hebron, Lawrence County, Miss., the son 
of Isaac Newton Bush and wife, Sarah Amanda (Smith) 
Bush. His paternal ancestors came from Wales, maternal 
from Scotland; all of his grandparents came from South 
Carolina about the beginning of the nineteenth century, 
settling chiefly in Lawrence, Simpson and Copiah Counties. 
Mr. Bush's early education was chiefly obtained at Hebron 
High School, under the teaching of Dr. Franklin L. Riley 
and others; he entered Mississippi College in 1900 and gradu- 
ated in May of 1903 with degree of Ph.B.; entered MiUsaps 
College in the fall of 1906, taking his degree from the Law 
Department there at the close of the year's session and has 
during the past year entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession at New Hebron. Was elected to the State Senate 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat and a member of the 
Baptist Church. 




Fred Marshall Bush. 



NINTH DISTRICT. 
Adams County. 

CHARLES FRANCIS ENGLE, of Natchez. Miss., son of 
Cyrus Gilbert Engle and Annie (Kieman) Engle, was bom 
November 10, 1875. at Natchez, Miss. His paternal ances- 
tors came from Scotland and settled in Virginia previoiis to 
the Revolutionary War; maternal came from England and 
settled in Natchez. Miss., before the Civil War. Thomas 
Kieman, an uncle, having served with a Louisiana regiment 
throughout the war. The Kiemans were originally from 
Ireland and belonged to the families of McKiernan and 
O'Reilly. Cyrus Gilbert Engle was bom at Millwood, Knox 
County, Ohio. At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined 
Company I, Ninety-seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteers, 
and served from 1862 until 1865. After the war he came to 
Natchez and is at present Collector of Customs of the Natchez 
District. He was the son of Dr. Enoch Engle and wife, 
Hannah Durbin. Charles Francis Engle received his early 
education in the primary schools and at the Cathedral School 
of Natchez, Miss. He attended St. Stanislaus College, Bay 
St. Louis, from 1888 to 1892, where he received a diploma 
conferring the honorary degree of M. A., the Mississippi 
Legislature authorizing the College to confer that degree. 
He also 'took a course of commercial law at the same school. 




Charles Francis Engle. 



1002 




James Stevens Logan. 




Elias Alford Rowan. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

and in 1895 entered the University of Mississippi, and in 
June, 1896, received the degree of Bachelor of La'^vs, con- 
ferred with distinction. In June, i8g6, he began actively 
practicing law in Natchez. In January, 1906, he was elected 
City Solicitor, and was re-elected in 1907. On November 
5, 1907, he was elected to the State Senate to represent the 
Ninth Senatorial District. Senator Engle is a Democrat; 
member of the Catholic Church and of the fraternal orders 
of Knights of . Columbus, and Woodmen of the World. 
He was married June 25, 1901, to Alleyene Carpenter, of 
Natchez, Miss. Mrs. Engle's paternal line is traced back to 
William Carpenter, of Soudan, England (see New England 
Register, Vol. i, page 137). On maternal side she is descend- 
ed from the Stith family of Virginia. Her parents. Allen 
Delos Carpenter and wife, Caroline (Stith) Carpenter, were 
both natives of Natchez. Mrs. Engle is a member of the 
Episcopal Chvxrch. 

TENTH DISTRICT. 
Jefferson and Claiborne Counties. 

JAMES STEVENS LOGAN, of Fayette, Miss., son of 
Michael Logan and Hannah (Moran) Logan, was bom March 
30, 1867, at Port Gibson, Claiborne County, Miss. He is of 
Irish descent, both parents having been natives of that 
coimtry. Michael Logan came with his parents from Ire- 
land to New York in 1836, and received his early education 
in that city. His father was a soldier in the Mexican War 
and was killed in the service of the United States at the battle 
of Buena Vista. James Stevens Logan received his early 
education in the country schools of Jefferson County, to 
which cotmty his father had removed in 1872. In 1885 he 
attended the A. and M. College, where he remained t'.vo years, 
completing the Sophomore course. He taught school in 
Jefferson County three years and then entered the Law 
Department of the University of Mississippi, from which 
institution he was graduated in 189 1 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. In 1892 he began the practice of law in 
Jefferson County, where he has since remained in active 
practice. He was very active in the late prohibition move- 
ment in Jefferson County, which resulted in ridding the 
county of saloons. On November 5, 1907, he was elected to 
the State Senate to represent the Tenth Senatorial District. 
Senator Logan is a Democrat, member of the Catholic Church ; 
married Katie Schwantz, daughter of August Schwantz and 
wife. Augusta. They have three children: John S., William 
Edward and James George. 



ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Copiah County. 

ELIAS ALFORD ROWAN, of Wesson, Miss., son of 
Samuel Rowan and Jeanette (Alford) Rowan, was bom near 
Crystal Springs, in Copiah County, Mi.-rS., December 31, 
1837. His paternal ancestors were French; maternal 
Scotch. Samuel Rowan was a native of Robinson County, 
N. C. from which place he removed to Copiah County. Miss., 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1003 



in 1833, where he died. Elias Alford Rowan obtained his 
early education in the country schools of his vicinity, after 
which he entered the Medical Department of the University 
of Louisiana (now Tulane), from which institution he was 
graduated March, 1866, with the degree of M. D. He was 
a soldier in ths Confederate Army, and was made First 
Lieutenant of Company G, Sixth Mississippi Regiment; was 
detached and served as Assistant Surgeon for two years 
with the rank of Captain. After the war Dr. Rowan con- 
tinued the practice of medicine. He was a member of the 
Lower House of the Mississippi Legislature, sessions of 1876, 
1877, 1884 and 1886; member of the State Senate 1896 and 
1900, and was re-elected to the State Senate November s, 
1907. He was active in the overthrow of Carpetbag rule in the 
State, and while a member of the Legislature took a leading 
part in the promotions of several reform movements, promi- 
nently among which are prohibition and the distribution of 
the school fund. Senator Rowan is a member of the Baptist 
Church, and of the fraternal orders of Odd Fellows and Ma- 
sons. He was married December 10, 1874, to JuUa Frank- 
lin Lamb, daughter of Isham Lamb and Martha (Brisco) 
Lamb, of Beauregard, Miss. Mrs. Rowan is a niece of John 
F. House, of Tennessee. Senator and Mrs. Rowan have 
seven children: Jeanette Alford, Martha (Wright) Rowan, 
Samuel Lamb, Elias Alford, Jr., Lillie Belle, Julia Franklin, 
and John House. 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 
Hinds and Warren Counties. 

WILLIAM K. McLAURIN. of Vicksburg, Miss., son of 
Lauchlin McLaurin and wife, Ellen Caroline (Tullus) Mc- 
Laurin, was bom March 29, 1857, near Trenton, Smith 
County, Miss. His paternal ancestors came to America 
from Scotland; maternal from Wales. John London, his 
great-grandfather, was a soldier in the Revolutionary Army, 
and participated in the battles of Lexington and Bunker 
Hill. Lauchlin McLaurin represented Smith County in 
1841, 1861, 1865 and 1875. The McLaurin family has for 
many years been prominent in the political history of the 
State, and its members have always held positions of honor. 
William K. McLaurin received his early education in the 
country schools of his vicinity, and for a while attended 
Mississippi College, Clinton, Miss. He studied law at home 
and was soon admitted to the bar, after which he located in 
Rolling Fork, afterwards m Vicksburg, where he has practiced 
law for many years. He was appointed Circuit Judge of 
his district February 22, 1S96, and served in that position 
until February 22, 1900; has been County Attorney since 
January, 1902. In 1903 he was elected to the State Senate 
from the Twelfth District, and was re-elected in 1907. In 
the Senate of 1904-1908 he was a member of the following 
committees: Judiciary, Claims. County Affairs (Chairman) 
and Insurance. Senator McLaurin is a Democrat; member 
of the Methodist Churcli and of the fraternal order of Knights 
of Pytliias. He was married to Willie Clanton Aden, daugh- 
ter of James Pen-/ Aden and wife, Elmira J, Aden, Novem- 
ber 25. 1892, at Valley Park. Mi:ss. They have four children: 
Lauchlin, Walter. Lucy Katherine and Sidney Lee. 




William K. McLaurin. 



1004 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




James R. McDowell. 



JAMES R. McDowell, of Jackson, was born March 3, 
1878. at Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., the son of 
David McDowell and wife, Ruth (Bonner) McDowell. Both 
paternal and maternal ancestors were of Scotch-Irish stock. 
His father was born in Louisiana, his mother in Mississippi. 
Mr. McDowell obtained his early education at the public 
school and at St. Thomas Hall, Holly Springs; he had his 
college training at the University of Mississippi, where he 
was graduated in 1898; he carried on his professional studies 
at the same institution, receiving his Bachelor's degree in law 
in 1900. He began the practice of law at Holly Springs, Miss., 
in the fall of^the same year; transferred his practice to 
Jackson in 1905. He filled the position of private Secretary 
to Governor A. H. Longino from January i, 1903, to Janu- 
ary 19, 1904; was Deputy Clerk Supreme Court, February i, 
1904, to Jxily IS, 1905; was elected to the State Senate 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, a member of the 
Episcopal Chtirch, belongs to the. Knights of Pythias and" 
the Benevolent and Protective- Order of Elks. He is not 
married. 




Clayton Daniel Potter. 



CLAYTON DANIEL POTTER, of Jackson, was bom 
January 13, 1880, in Hinds County, Miss., the son of Daniel 
.Mayes Potter and wife, Octavia Kentucky (Smith) Potter. 
His paternal grandfather came from Connecticut to Missis- 
sippi about 1832; his grandfather was a member of the Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1865.' The maternal grandparents 
of the subject of this sketch were from Tennessee (Gen. J. A. 
Smith, of the Confederate Army, was a cousin of his mother) 
and were descended on the mother's side from Turner More- 
head, a Revolutionary soldier; one of his grandmother's 
brothers was Gov. James Turner Morehead, of Kentucky. 
Mr. Potter obtained his early education at the schools of 
Liberty Grove and Jackson; attended Millsaps College and 
was graduated in 1902; studied law at that institution but 
did not take a degree ; was admitted to the bar by examina- 
tion in February, 1904, and has practiced his profession in 
Jackson. He is a Depaocrat and a Knight of Pythias. 




George Hansel Banks. 



THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Scott and Newton Counties. 

GEORGE HANSEL BANKS, of Newton, was bom 
February 8, 1876, at Beach Springs, Neshoba County, Miss., 
the son of William Washington Uriah Banks and wife, 
Tolitha EUen (Phillips) Banks. His paternal ancestors came 
from South Carolina and Georgia; his great-grandfather, 
George Banks, served under Andrew Jackson in his fights 
with the Indians in 1812; and both his grandfathers, Gilbert 
Banks and Francis Marion Phillips, were soldiers in the Con- 
federate Army. His father, also, was in the Confederate 
service, enlisting in the Fifth Mississippi in 1861 and serv-ing 
till the final surrender. Mr. Banks attended the public 
schools of Neshoba County; also became a student at Harper* 
ville College, in Scott County, Miss., graduating in 1898; 
later, entered Millsaps College and finished the law course 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1005 



there in 190a, receiving degree of Bachelor of Laws. He 
opened an office in Newton the same year, where he has since 
resided, actively engaged in the practice of his profession; 
was elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Banks is a Democrat and a member of the Primitive Baptist 
Church. He was married October 4, 1900, at Hillsboro, 
Miss., to Ellie B. Neal, daughter of Dr. Vandy Marcellus 
Neal and wife, Addie Neal. His wife's father served as a 
surgeon in the Confederate Army. Mr. and Mrs. Banks 
have three chilrden: George Neal, Mary Olga and William 
Marcellus. 



FOURTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Lauderdale County. 

JOHN ALSON BAILEY, of Bailey, Miss., son of Samuel 
Monroe Bailey and wife, Therisa (Anglin) Bailey, was bom 
April IS, 1858, at Gummin, Ga. His father was a native of 
Shelby, N. C, and mother of Cummin, Ga.; father served 
throughout the Civil War in Company C, Forty-first Missis- 
sippi Regiment, C. S. A. He located in Lauderdale County, 
Miss., in 1858. At his death, in 1897, he was one of the 
largest planters in that coiuity. John Alson Bailey received 
his early education in the country schools of Lauderdale 
County, after which he entered Cooper Institute, from which 
school he was graduated with first honors, with B. S. degree. 
He was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1890. 
Upon the organization of the Populist party in the State he 
became a supporter of its principles; was Presidential 
Elector of the party in 1900 and a member of the State and 
National Executive Committee. He was elected on the 
Democratic ticket State Senator from Lauderdale County 
November 5, 1907. He has always been prominent in all 
organizations looking to the betterment of the^,..faj3iiing 
classes; was President of the County Farmers' Alliance for 
a ntimber of years; is President of the Southern Cotton 
Association and Secretary of the Good Roads Association. 
He is engaged in planting and merchandising, and is the first 
farmer to represent Lauderdale County in the State Senate. 
Senator Bailey is a member of the Baptist Church and of the 
fraternal orders of Odd Fellows and Masons. He was mar- 
ried December 11, 187S, to Walterine Gray McClung, daugh- 
ter of Leonidas M. T. McClung and wife. Celeste Grinage, of 
Houma, La. Mrs. Bailey's father was a near relative of 
Col. A, K. McClung. They have twelve children: Daisy 
(Bailey) Hobjrood. Samuel Monroe, Annie (Bailey) Cook. 
Leonidas M. T., Ruth Celeste, Carlotta Opheha, Azilee Web- 
ster, James Preston, Walterine Evelyn, Joseph Omerea and 
John Alson. 

FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Kemper and Winston Counties. 

JAMES ROBERT KEY, of Rio, Miss., son of Abel Key 
and Elizabeth Chambers (Warren) Key, was boni October 
14, 1844. near DeKalb, Kemper County, Miss. His father 
removed from Anson, N. C, in 1833 and settled near DeKalb. 
He was the first Clerk of the Circuit Court of Kemper County 




John Alson Bailey. 




X^ 



James Robert Key. 



1006 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



where he died May 7, 187 1. He was the son of John Key, 
and wife, Martha, who resided near DeKalb until their death. 
James Robert Key's mother was the daughter of WiUiam 
Warren and wife, Isabella, of Neshoba County, Miss. He 
received his early education in the country schools, after 
which he devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, in which 
he has since engaged. He was a member of the Board of 
Supervisors of Kemper County in 1880 and 1881 ; was Sheriff 
of that county, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889; member of the 
Lower House of the Mississippi Legislature, 1892-1894. and 
member of the State Senate, 1900-1902. He was re-elected 
to the State Senate November s, 1907. Senator Key is a 
Democrat; is a deacon in the Baptist Church, and has served 
as Deputy Grand Master of Masons for the Sixteenth Dis- 
trict since 1902; was Master of Center Ridge Lodge fourteen 
years. On February 26, 1866, he was married to Margaret 
Jane Gill, daughter of William George Gill and wife, Mary 
(Warren), of DeKalb, Miss. They have ten children: John 
Morrison, Virginia (Key) Jackson, Cornelius L., Mary (Key) 
Little, Julia (Key) Pigford, William W., James Robert 
Stanley W., Rufus Frank and Annie Bertha. . 




Walter Price. 



SIXTEENTH DISTRICT, 

Noxubee Covmty. - 

WALTER PRICE, of Prairie Point, was bom August 25, 
1854, at Brooksville, Noxubee County, Miss., the son o 
Edward Mobley Price and wife, Sarah (Taliaferro) Price. 
His paternal ancestors came from South Carolina; maternal 
from Virginia; his mother's grandfather, Benjamin Taila 
ferro, was a Captain in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Price 
obtained his early education in the common schools; the 
principal school that he attended was at BrooksviUe, which 
was then conducted by a veteran of the Confederate Army — 
Captain T. J. Stokes; owing to impoverishment caused by 
the war his parents could not aid him in gaining a collegiate 
education. His occupation has always been that of a 
farmer, and he has lived all of his life in Noxubee County. 
He was elected a member of the County Board of Super- 
visors in 1892, and to the State Senate in 1896, and re-elected 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat; has been a member 
of the County Executive Committee; was a delegate to the 
National Convention at Chicago which first nominated 
Bryan. He is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and has 
held the office of Recording Steward, also- Superintendent 
of Sunday-school for twenty years; is an Odd Fellow and 
Knight of P>'thias. Senator Price was married July 7. 18S0. 
to Bettie Caroline Dixon, daughter of Judge Thomas Holliday 
Dixon and Margaret Ann (Koger) Dixon. His wife's grand- 
father. Major Joseph Koger. ser\-ed in the War of 181 2, and 
later was for a number of years in the Mississippi Senate, 
retiring in 1S56 at the age of seventy-two. Mr. and Mrs, 
Price have two children: Mary Rhoda Price, at home, and 
Edward Thomas Price, instructor in Polytechnic College. 
Forth Worth, Texas. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1007 



SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Leake and Neshoba Counties. 

ROBERT LEE BRELAND, of Philadelphia, was bom 
November 25, 1870, near Union, Neshoba County, Miss., and 
is the son of Oliver Franklin Breland and wife. Minerva 
(Odom) Breland. His paternal ancestors came to America 
from Scotland and settled in South Carolina; maternal 
ancestors came from Enj^land. His great-grandfather Bre- 
land was a soldier of the Revolution under Marion; maternal 
great-grandfather was also a soldier of the Revolution. 
The father of the subject of this sketch was a Baptist min- 
ister and served four years as a Confederate soldier. Mr. 
Breland attended the primary schools of Neshoba County 
and the high schools at Dixon, Miss.; was a teacher in the 
Neshoba County schools from 1893 to 1900; elected County 
Superintendent of Education of Neshoba County 1899; 
elected to the House of Representatives November 3, 1903 
Mr. Breland is a Democrat; member of the Baptist Church 
deacon; Mason, Odd Fellow and Woodman of the World'- 
was married November i, 1894, to Rosa Lee Johnson, daugh- 
ter of Cornelius Johnson and wife, Matilda (TuUos) Johnson, 
of Dixon. Miss. Senator and Mrs. Breland have two chil- 
dren: Clyde Lamont and Hazel Lee. In the House of 1904- 
1908 Mr. Breland was a member of the following committees: 
Liquor Traffic, Man-ufactures and Census and Apportion- 
ment. 




Robert Lee Breland. 



EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Madison County. 

ELISHA BRYAN HARRELL, of Canton, was bom 
April 27, 1868, near Old Vaiden, in Carroll County, Miss. 
He is the son of George B. Harrell and wife, Mary Eliza 
(Cross) Harrell. His ancestors on both sides were Missis- 
sippians; paternal grandfather lived at Hernando, mater- 
nal at Vaiden; his father served through the Civil War in 
the First Mississippi Cavalry. Mr. Harrell obtained his 
early education in rural schools; attended Water Valley 
High School under J. R. Preston for three years; entered 
Millsaps College and took his degree as Bachelor of Laws in 
1900. He began practicing law at Madison Station in 1901 ; 
removed to Canton in 1904; served as Deputy Chancery 
Clerk for one year, then resumed the practice of law in that 
town; was elected Clerk of the city of Canton in 1906, and 
State Senator in 1907. He is a Democrat, a Presbyterian 
and a Knight of Pythias. He was married May 29, 1S96, 
near Madison Station to Sallie Catherine Ray, daughter of 
William Anderson Ray and wife. Martha E. (Glass) Ray. 
His wife's father was a Methodist preacher and a farmer, 
well known in Madison and Neshoba Counties. 




Elisha Br>'an Harrell 



1008 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Washington Dorse y Gibbs 




Hazlewood Power Parish. . 



NINETEENTH DISTRICT. 
Yazoo County. 

WASHINGTON DORSEY GIBBS, of Yazoo City. 
Miss., son of Quesney Dibrell Gibbs and wife, Sarah Dorsey 
Gibbs. was bom August 6, 1839, at Breckenridge Hall, 
Yazoo County, Miss. His paternal ancestors were English 
and immigrated to Virginia before the Revolutionary War; 
maternal came to America about the ;;ime that Lord Balti- 
more made his first settlement in Maryland, from which 
place they moved to Kentucky. Quesney Dibrell Gibbs 
was a lawyer of Nashville, Tenn., and moved to Manches- 
ter (now Yazoo City) in 1837; was a member of the Missis- 
sippi Legislature in 1862, and in that year raised a company 
of which he was elected Captain, and served in the Thirtieth 
Mississippi Regiment, Walthall's Brigade, C. S. A. He was 
stricken with camp fever in 1862 and was sent home, where 
he died a short time after. He was the son of George W. 
Gibbs and wife, Lee Ann (Dibrell) of Nashville. Tenn. 
George W. Gibbs' father was a soldier in the Revolution, and 
his wife's father, Charles Dibrell, was an officer in "Light 
Horse" Harry Lee's Brigade. Washington Dorsey Gibbs 
received his primary education in Yazoo County, after which 
he entered West Tennessee (xiUege at Jackson. Tenn., and 
later the University of Nashville. He was a student of the 
University of Virginia in 1856. 1857. 1858; was graduated 
in law from the Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., in 
1859. After graduation he did not practice law, but devoted 
himself to agricultural pursuits and to politics. In March, 
1862, he enlisted as a private in Wirt Adams' regiment of 
cavalry, and while on a scout in December, 1863, was cap- 
tured and imprisoned at Camp Morton, where he remained 
until February, 1865. During his imprisonment he was 
made a Sergeant of his company. He was a member of the 
State Senate from 1878 to 1S82; member of House of Rep- 
resentatives 1886-88, and Presidential Elector in 1876 and 
i888. In i860 he supported the Bell and Everett ticket, 
but since the Civil War has been a member of the Demo- 
cratic party. In 1875 he took an active part in .the over- 
throw of Carpetbag rule in Mississippi. He was endorsed 
for Congress by his county in 1873, 1886, 1890, 1896. He 
was elected to the State Senate from Yazoo County Novem- 
ber s, 1907. Senator Gibbs is a member of the Methodist 
Church, and is a Mason. He was married January 11, i860, 
to Louisa Johnson, daughter of John Johnson and wife, 
Loraine (Higginbotham) Johnson, of Yazoo County. Mrs. 
Gibbs' ancestors came from South Carolina during territorial 
days; she died in 1879. Senator Gibbs has five children: 
Lxila (Gibbs) Kirk, Quesney Dibrell, Washington Dorsey. 
Lee and John Johnson. 

TWENTIETH DISTRICT. 

Sharkey and Issaquena Counties. 

HAZLEWOOD POWER PARISH, of MayersvUle. was 
bom September 14. 18S0. at that place, the son of Robert 
Davis Parish and wife, Caroline Harrison (Power) Parish. 
His father was a soldier in the Confederate Army during the 
Civil War; in civil life was a practicing physician in Issa- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1009 



quena County; was County Health Officer for years; also 
for several years was Chairman of the County Democratic 
Executive Committee. Mr. Parish attended the public 
schools of Issaquena County, and later was a student at 
Jefferson Military College at Washington Miss. He entered 
the Law School of the University of Mississippi and was 
graduated therefrom in 1899, with degree of LL.B.; since 
that date he has followed the active practice of law in his 
town and county. He served as Lieutenant of the First 
Regiment Mississippi National Guard in 1897; has been 
attorney for the Board of Supervisors bf Issaquena County 
for the past five years ; was member of the State Legislature 
during the session of 1906 and elected Senator from the 
Twentieth District in 1907. Mr. Parish is a Democrat, and 
was Secretar>- of the County Executive Committee for sev- 
eral years ; is a member of the Episcopal Church and of the 
Knights of Pj-thias, having served as Chancellor Commander 
of his Lodge. He was married at New Orleans, La.. Novem- 
ber 14, 1906, to Mildred Henrietta Lillard. His wife died 
June 9, 1907. 



TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 
Holmes County. 

SAMUEL NEELY SAMPLE, of Ebenezer, was bom 
August 22, 1856, near Franklin, in Holmes County, Miss. 
and is the son of Samuel Sample and wife, Harriet (Paulling) 
Sample. His father was a physician and planter of Holmes 
County; died July 5, 1858, in the fiftieth year of his age. Mr. 
Sample attended the primary schools of Holmes Co^mty in an 
irregular way until he was fourteen years of age, when he 
was given a position as clerk in a store; has been engaged 
in the mecrantile business since that time, also planting; 
member of Board of Supervisors of Holmes County 1892- 
1896; Alderman of Ebenezer for twelve years; elected to the 
House of Representatives from Holmes County JCovember 
3. 1903. Mr. Sample is a Democrat; Chairman of County 
Committee for years; member of Presbyterian Church, 
elder; Mason, Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the 
World; married February 25, 190a, at Yazoo City, Miss., to 
Mary Read Eggleston, daughter of Edmund Trent Eggleston 
and wife, Mary (Read) Eggleston. Mrs. Sample's ancestors 
came to Mississippi from Kentucky and Virginia. Senator 
and Mrs. Sample have three children: Samuel Edmund 
Walter Payne and Eugene Carter. In the House of 1904- 
1908 Mr. Sample was a member of the following commit- 
tees: Ways and Means, Levees, Registration and Election, 
Investigating State Offices, and is the author of the Anti- 
Lobbying resolution, which was adopted by the House early 
in the session of 1906. He is also the author of what is 
known as the "Sample Labor Contract Law," as well as the 
sections of the Code of 1906 placing a $500 tax on peddlers 
selling medicine and merchandise on credit, where security 
was taken. He was elected to the Senate from the Twenty- 
first District (Holmes County) November 5, 1907. Senator 
Sample is Chairman of the Finance Committee and member 
of the Temperance and other important committees. 




Samuel Neely Sample. 



lOiO 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Wiley Sanders 



TWENTY-SECOND DISTRICT. 

WILEY SANDERS, of Kosciusko, was bom July 26. 
1852, in Jefferson County, Ala., and is the son of Absolom 
Sanders and wife, Anna (Dickinson) Sanders. His paternal 
ancestors were from North Carolina ; maternal from Georgia ; 
both coming originally from England. William Sanders, 
grandfather of subject of this sketch, was a soldier of the 
Revolution; subject's father served in war against Seminole 
Indians. Mr. Sanders attended the schools of Attala 
Cotmty under the instruction of James Dennis and R. V. 
Wall; occupation, editor and farmer; elected a member of 
the House of Representatives from Attala County in 1884; 
elected State Senator from Attala County (Twenty-second 
District) in 1899; re-elected November 3, 1903, and Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. Mr. Sanders is a Democrat, member of the 
Baptist Church, Knights of Pythias; was married April 27, 
1884, to Fannie J. Stokes, daughter of Richard Stokes and 
wife, Rebecca, of Grenada County, Miss. Senator and Mrs. 
Sanders have seven children: Harold B., Stokes L., Fannie 
Z., Marcie B., Paul H., Roger W. and Ethel. In the Senate 
of 1904-1908 Mr. Sanders was a member of the following 
Committees: Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures, 
Education and Penitentiary and Prisons, Revision Code of 
1906; was instrumental in the final passage of the uniform 
textbook bill in 1904. 




J. Lem Seawright. 



TWENTY-THIRD DISTRICT. 
Oktibbeha and Choctaw Counties. 

J. LEM SEAWRIGHT, of Ackerman, was bom October 
31, 18 71, in Attala County, Miss., the son of Robert M. and 
wife, Mary (Townsend) Seawright. His father was a native 
of Mississippi, his mother of Alabama; the former served in 
the Clonfederate Army, a soldier of the Thirty-fifth Missis- 
sippi Infantry; at the time of his death in 1893, he was Treas- 
urer of Choctaw County. Mr. Seawright attended the common 
schools of Choctaw County, also taking a course at French 
Camp Academy, where he graduated in 1890. During the 
same year he took up his residence in Ackerman and began 
newspaper work. In time he became editor and publisher 
of the Ackerman Plainckaler. While carrying on his edi- 
torial labors he took up the study of law and decided to 
adopt a legal career. In 1902 he passed his examination 
and was admitted to the bar, after which he leased his 
newspaper and entered into a professional partnership with 
S. R. Hughston in Ackerman. Mr. Seawright has held a 
number of civil offices; in 1893 he was appointed County 
Treasurer to fill the unexpired term of his father, serving 
two years in that office, and he served for four years as 
Alderman, in which post, by virtue of his office, he was 
Town Treasurer; also for six years he was Trustee of Acker- 
man graded schools. In 1900 he was elected to the State 
Senate from the Twenty-third District, and was elected a 
second time November 6, 1907. Senator Seawright is a 
Democrat, has been Secretary of the County Executive Com- 
mittee for four years, and has also served as Secretan.' of 
the Congressional Committee. In 1904 he was chosen 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1011 



Presidential Elector from the Fourth Congressional District, 
and was selected to carry the returns to Washington. He is 
a member of the M. E. Church and is affiliated with the Ma- 
sons, Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows and Woodmen of the 
World. He was married February 15, 1903, to Mallie Hunt, 
davighter of William T. and Fannie (Neal) Hunt, of Acker- 
man. Mr. and Mrs. Seawright have two children: Mildred 
and J. Lem, Jr. 



TWENTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. 
Clay and Webster Counties. 

FREDERICK GEORGE BARRY, of West Point, Miss., 
son of John Barry and Maria (Gannon) Barry, was bom at 
Woodbviry, Tenn., January 12, 1845. His father was a 
native of Dublin, Ireland, the son of John and Francis 
Barry, who belonged to a prominent Episcopal family of 
that city. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and 
held positions of trust in the banks of Dublin and Ennis, 
Ireland. He married Maria Gannon, the daughter of a 
well-to-do Catholic, and came to the United States about 1844, 
arriving first in New York City, and soon after settling at 
Woodbury, Tenn., where he engaged in school teaching and 
merchandising, after failing to get title and possession of 
government lands, which he had purchased in New York. 
In i8sa he removed to Nashville, Tenn., and was promi- 
nent in the business and social circles of that place. He 
died in that city February 12, 1858, a devoted Mason, whose 
funeral obseqtiies were attended with distinguished Masonic 
honors in that city. Frederick George Barry was left an 
orphan in early youth, and received few educational advan- 
tages. At the age of thirteen he came to Mississippi and 
secured employment in a store. While assisting in the 
Circuit Clerk's office at Aberdeen he studied law, and about 
1869 was licensed to practice, having stood his examination 
in open court before Judge J, M, Acker, William F. Dowd 
and R. O. Reynolds, who commended him in very flattering 
terms. He was City Clerk of Aberdeen for a term of two 
years; city Tax Collector for unexpired term of nine months, 
and City Attorney of West Point for a number of years. 
He is a Democrat; was Elector at large from Mississippi on 
the Hancock ticket; served in the Confederate Army in 
Company E, Eighth Regiment Confederate Cavalry, through- 
out the war, and was elected to the State Senate in 1875, in 
which capacity he ser^'ed four years, and in 1878 introduced 
and pushed to its passage the first bill in the South (except 
Georgia) regiilating railroads. In 1884 he was elected to 
the United States House of Representatives; was re-elected 
in 1886, after which, with no opposition, he voluntarily 
retired for the purpose of resuming his law practice. On 
November s, 1907. he wais elected to the Mississippi State 
Senate, the nomination having been unanimously tendered 
him at the preceding primary. Mr. Barry was married to 
Martha George, daughter of Lindsey and Elizabeth (Bibb) 
George, of Aberdeen, Miss., May ai, 187 1. Mrs. Barry, on 
the maternal side, was descended from the Bibb family of 




X4 

Frederick George Barry. 



1012 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Alabama. She died a few years after her marriage, leaving 
one child, Martha Amanda, who became the wife of Dr. 
L. G. Nisbet, of Aberdeen. By a later marriage Mr. Barry 
has one child, Jennie. 




Malcolm Argyle Franklin. 



TWENTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. 
Lowndes County. 

MALCOLM ARGYLE FRANKLIN, of Columbus, was 
bom December i, i86a, at Columbus, Miss., and is the son 
of Sidney Smith Franklin and wife, Ann Eliza (Campbell) 
Franklin. His paternal ancestors came to Mississippi from 
New York, maternal from Tennessee. Mr. Franklin attended 
the primary schools of Columbus ; engaged in merchandising 
and planting; elected to the House of Representatives from 
Lowndes County in 1895, and re-elected in 1899; elected to 
the State Senate from the Twenty-fifth District November 
3, 1903. Senator Franklin is a Democrat; member of the 
Baptist Church; Mason. He is tmmarried. During his 
service in the Legislature he has served on some of its most 
important committees, and has always been a steadfast advo- 
cate of liberal appropriations to the educational institutions 
of the State. He has been instrumental in securing ample 
State aid for the State Industrial Institute and College for 
young women, located at Columbus. In the Senate of 1904— 
1908 Mr. Franklin was a member of the following commit- 
tees: Finance, Banks and Banking, Penitentiary and Prisons, 
Insurance, Joint Committee Universities and Colleges. He 
was re-elected to the Senate from I^owndes County Novem- 
ber 5, 1907, and at the expiration of his present term will 
bave had a continuous legislative service of sixteen years. 




Lee McMillan. 



TWENTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. 
Carroll and Montgomery Counties. 

LEE McMillan, of Can-ollton, was bom April 29, 1847, 
at that place, the son of Smith McMillan and wi/e, Obedience 
Annette (Hall) McMillan. His maternal ancestors were 
Scotch-Irish and emigrated first to Pennsylvania, thence to 
Virginia, later part of the family went to the Carolinas; his 
maternal ancestors came from England to Georgia. The 
maternal grandmother of the subject of this sketch was one 
of the Rurmells family, originally from Virginia; her father 
sat in Mississippi's first Constitutional Convention; her 
brother was Governor H. G. Runnells, of Mississippi, and 
Governor H. R. Runnells of Texas was her cousin. Lyman 
Hall, a maternal ancestor, was one of the signers of the 
Declaration of Independence from Georgia. Mr. McMillan 
attended the rural schools of his vicinity and the Middleton 
High School; enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1S62 at 
the age of fifteen in the Twenty-eighth Mississippi Cavalr>', 
serving until the surrender in April, 1865, After the war 
he entered the University of Mississippi, but did not graduate. 
In 1869 he began the life of a cotton planter, which he con- 
tinued many years. He was a member of the Board of 
Education of his county from the enactment of the school 
law until 1894. In that year he went to Washington and 



':,.lyi 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1013 



took the office of file clerk in the House of Representa- 
tives, serving until January i, 1896; from that" date till 
March, 1897. was a clerk of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission; then was transferred to the office of Secretary of 
the United States Senate, where he served until April, 1900, 
and then returned home. Since the law was enacted cre- 
ating County Pension Boards he has been President of the 
Board of Pension Commissioners of Carroll County. Was 
elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. Mr. Mc- 
Millan is a Democrat; was a member of his County Execu- 
tive Committee during the upheaval of 1875, and many years 
since. He is a Pr'esbyterian and an elder in his Church; has 
been a Mason since 1871. He was married January 6, 1869, 
near CarroUton to Mattie Buchanan, daughter of Thomas 
Edmondson Buchanan and wife, Sarah Ann (Edmondson) 
Buchanan. His wife's family was from Georgia. Senator 
and Mrs. McMillan have one living child, Joseph Lewis Mc- 
Millan, of Valley HiH, Mississippi. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Leflore and Tallahatchie Counties. 

. ROBERT VAN BUREN POLLARD, of Greenwood, 
was bom November 13, 1871, at Erin, Houston County, 
Tenn., the son of James Joseph Pollard and wife, Sarah 
Elizabeth (Turner) Pollard. His ancestors on both sides 
were descendants of early Virginian settlers; his mother's 
grandfather served in the Revolutionary War and in the 
War of 181 a; his father was a soldier in the Fiftieth Ten- 
nessee Infantry during the Civil War, and in 1875 was a 
member of the Tennessee Legislature. Mr. Pollard attended 
the public schools of his county, then entered the Edgewood 
Normal School, where he took the degree of B. S.; was at 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn., for three sessions; 
next studied for a time at the Jennings Business College, 
Nashville, Tenn.; then entered the National Normal Uni- 
versity, Lebanon, Ohio, where he took the A. B. degree. 
He studied law in the office of Messrs. Rush and Gardner, 
Greenwood, Miss.; passed the Supreme Court examination, 
and began the practice of law at that place December i, 
1898, in which he has since been steadily engaged. He is a 
Democrat, a member of the M. E. Church, South, and one of 
the Board of Stewards; also is a Master Mason of his lodge. 
He was married September 3, 1903, at Columbus, to Bettie 
Freear Young:, daughter of John Davis Yoiing and AUce 
Baskerville Young, of that city. His wife's paternal ances- 
tors came to Mississippi from Tennessee and those on her 
mother's side from Virginia. Senator and Mrs. Pollard have 
two children: Robert Van Buren, Jr., and John Davis, 

TWENTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. 
Yalobusha and Grenada Coiinties. 

FRANCIS HIGDON HARPER, of Grenada County. 
Miss., son of Thomas Walter Harper and wife, Mary (Tyner; 
Harper, was bom in Carroll County, Miss., June 6, 1872. 
His father was a native of Tennessee, and was the son of 
Higdon Robinson Harper and Sarah (Pierce) Harper. 




Robert Van Buren Pollard. 




Francis Higdon Harper. 



1014 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



He came to Carroll County, Miss., with his parents when 
a child and continued to make his home in the State 
through life. He was a soldier in the Confederate Army; 
belonged to the Grenada Rifles, Company G. Fifteenth Mis- 
sissippi Regiment, and participated in all the battles that 
engaged Johnston's army. He surrendered at Greensboro, 
N. C, April 26, 1865, holding the rank of Sergeant. His 
wife was the daughter of Walter Pierce, of Halifax County, 
N. C. Francis Higdon Harper received his early education 
at Ebenezer, Carroll County, Miss. He attended the Missis- 
sippi Normal College at Houston, Miss., 1895-97, after which 
he became a teacher in the public schools of the State. He 
has been a member of the Grenada County Board of Exam- 
iners for teachers since 1904. At the outbreak of the Span- 
ish-American War he volunteered and came to Jackson for 
enlistment, but failed to pass the examination. He was 
elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907, from the 
Twenty-eighth District. Senator Harper is unmarried. 




John Lawrence Hebron, Jr. 




Thomas Rupert Baird. 



TWENTY-NINTH DISTRICT. 
Washington and Sunflower Counties. 

JOHN LAWRENCE HEBRON, JR., of GreenvUle, 
was bom July 6, 1864. at Vicksburg, Miss., and is the son 
of John Lawrence Hebron and Ellen (Ellington) Hebron . 
The father of the subject of this sketch was a physician, and 
a stu-geon in the Confederate Army; member of House of 
Representatives in 1876; lessee of State Penitentiary, 1877- 
1878; paternal ancestors came from Virginia. Mr. Hebron 
attended Mississippi College in 1877, 1878, 1879; entered the 
University of Mississippi in 1881; continued there six years; 
received department diplomas, Freshman medal won in 1883; 
Phi Sigma Anniversarian in 1884; was graduated from Law 
School in 1887 with LL.B. degree; County Attorney of Wash- 
ington County, 1896-1900; elected State Senator Novem- 
ber 3, 1903. Mr. Hebron is a Democrat; served on Coiinty 
and District Executive Committees; member of Presbyterian 
Church and Knights of Pythias. Delta Psi; married July 6, 
1893, at Senatobia, Miss., to Lula Dean, daughter of John M. 
and Martha (Crawford) Dean. Senator and Mrs. Hebron 
have three children : Corinne, Dean and Cora. In the Senate 
of 1904-1908 Mr. Hebron was a member of the following 
committees: Printing, Railroads and Franchises, Military, 
Levees. Temperance. He is now a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the State University, and President of the Board 
of Mississippi Levee Commissioners, and was re-elected to 
the Senate from the Twenty-ninth District November 5. 
1907. Senator Hebron is President pro tern of -the Senate 
and a member of some of its most important committees. 



THOMAS RUPERT BAIRD. of Indianola, Miss., son of 
James Madison Baird and Eliza T. (Rupert) Baird, was bom 
December ri, 1850. at Crawford. Lowndes County, Miss. 
His father was a native of Asheville, N. C, and removed to 
Mississippi. He went from Crawford, Miss., to the Missis- 
sippi Delta, and after the Civil War returned to Asheville. 
N. C. and died in Sunflower County in 1879. His wife was 



^i(M 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1015 



the daughter of John Rupert, of Georgia. Thomas Rupert 
Baird received his early education near Asheville, N. C, in 
1866-70. In 1870-71 he attended college at Lexington, Ky., 
entering the law department during the last year, after which 
he read law under Judge Bailey at Asheville; was admitted 
to the bar by the Supreme Court of North Carolina, and 
licensed to practice before Judge Fisher in Sunflower County, 
Miss., in 1872. He was a member of the Mississippi Legis- 
lature of 1890; was chairman of a Democratic club in 1900, 
and has always been a zealous worker for his party. He was . 
elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. Senator Baird 
is a member of the Christian Church. He was married to 
Annie L. Montgomery, daughter of Livingston Montgomery 
and wife, Serenthy (Love) Montgomery, of Yazoo County, 
Miss., January 15, 1890. 



THIRTIETH DISTRICT. 
Bolivar County. 

JOHN CRAWFORD BURRUS. of Benoit, was bom 
September s. 1847, in Hinds County, Miss., and is the son 
of John Crawford Burrus and wife, Louisa (McGehee) Burrus. 
His paternal ancestors came to Mississippi from Virginia; 
maternal ancestors were from Georgia, and located in Wilkin- 
son Cotmty, Miss.; on both sides were soldi<irs of the Revolu- 
tion. The father of the subject of this sketch was a graduate 
of the University of Virginia, with the B. A. degree; was 
admitted to the bar in Hunts ville, Ala., in 1838; removed to 
Bolivar Coimty, Miss., and was Probate Judge of that county 
for many years. Mr. Burrus was taught by private tutors 
at the home of his father in BoUvar County, Miss., until he 
reached the age of twelve years; attended a preparatory 
school at Nashville, Tenn., one session, and enlisted as a 
private in Company I, Ninth Texas Cavalry, and served 
until the close of the war between the United States and the 
Confederate States; engaged in planting in Bolivar County 
from that time to this; member of Board of Supervisors of 
Bolivar Cormty from 1890 to 1896; Justice of the Peace from 
1896 to 1904. Senator Burrus is a Democrat; member of 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South; Mason, Knight of Honor 
and Knight of Pythias; married March 17. 1S70, to Mar- 
garet Annie Barritt, daughter of Lucas Barritt and wife, 
Emily (Nutter) Barritt, of Kentucky. Mrs. Burrus died 
October ii, 1886. Mr. Burrus has one living child, Mar- 
garet (Burrus) Barry, of Benoit, Miss. In the House of 
1904-1908 Mr. Burrus was a member of the following com- 
mittees: Appropriations. Levees, Agriculture (Ch.). He was 
elected to the Senate from the Thirtieth District November 5 
1907. 

THIRTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 
Chicka.saw, CaLhoun and Pontotoc Counties. 

CHARLES EDWARD FRANKLIN, of Pontotoc, was 
bom October 28, 1867, at Poplar Springs, Pontotoc County. 
Miss., and is the son of John I. Gracy Franklin and wife, 
Amanda (Allbritton) Franklin. His paternal ancestors were 
from South Carolina; maternal from Alabama; those on 




John Crawford Burrus. 




Charles E. Frankhn. 



1016 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



paternal side coming originally from Scotland. Mr. Franklin 
attended the public schools of Pontotoc Coimty under the 
instruction of George Fortune, W. A. Dye, Marion Payne, 
W. F- Davis and others; entered Poplar Springs Normal 
CoUege and was graduated with the B. A. degree in June, 
1890; took commercial course in 1889; taught school seven 
years; bookkeeper and salesman four years; elected Mayor 
of Pontotoc in 1900; re-elected in 1903; elected State Senator 
from Pontotoc, Calhoun and Chickasaw Counties (Thirty- 
first District) November 3, 1903. Senator Franklin is a 
Democrat; member of Baptist Church, Knight of Pythias; 
married November 18, 1896, at Shelby, Ala., to Mamie M. 
Glenn, daughter of David C. and wife, Laura Glenn, of Shelby , 
Ala. Mr. and Mrs. Franklin have had bom to them four 
children: Claud Lamar (died September 23, 1905), Edward 
Grady, Mary Gladys and Charles Edward, Jr. In the Senate 
of 1 904-1 908 Mr. Franklin was a member of the following 
committees: Printing, Education, Military, County Affairs, 
Engrossed Bills, Joint Committee Investigating State Officers, 
Revision Committee. He was re-elected to the Senate from 
Thirty-first District November 5. 1907. 




John Jefferson Adams. 



JOHN JEFFERSON ADAMS, of Pittsboro, Calhoun 
County, Miss., son of James Jefferson Adams and wife, Mary 
(Burson) Adams, was bom May 17, i860, at Slate Springs, 
Calhoun County, Miss. His father was a native of Virginia, 
and about 1840 removed to Slate Springs, Miss., where he 
married Mary Burson, daughter of Amos Burson, a native 
of Alabama, November 23, 1858. From Slate Springs he 
moved to Corinth, Miss. He was a voltmteer soldier of the 
Confederacy, and died in its service, September 4, i86a, and 
was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Richmond, Va. His 
father, John G. B. Adams, died in Texas. John Jefferson 
Adams received his early education in the cotmtry schools 
of his vicinity," after which he pvirsued a course of study at 
home. He entered the Cumberland University Law School 
at Lebanon, Tenn., in 1896, from which school he was grad- 
uated in 1897. He attended the University of Mississippi 
in 1898, and began the practice of law in 1899 at Pittsboro 
Calhoun County, Miss. Prior to this he had merchandised 
at Belief ontaine, Webster County, Miss., of which place he 
was Mayor. At Pittsboro he engaged in merchandising in 
connection with his law practice, and served as a member of 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. He was a member of 
the Democratic Executive Committee of Webster County 
eight years, and served six years as Secretary. For the past 
five years he has been a member of the Democratic Executive 
Committee of the Fourth Congressional District. He was 
elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. Senator 
Adams is a member of the Baptist Church; is a Mason. 
Knight of Pythias, Woodman of the World, and was mar- 
ried January 4, 1882, to Mary Masouri McCain, daughter of 
R. W. McCain and wife, Eliza, of Bellefontaine, Miss. They 
have three children: James J., Virgie (Adams) Cm thirds 
and Mary Z. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1017 



THIRTY-SECOND DISTRICT. 

Lafayette County. 

GEORGE ROBERT HIGHTOWER. of Oxford, was 
bom October 15, 1865, at Smith's Mill, Carroll County (now 
Grenada), Miss., and is the son of George Hightower and 
wife, Nancy (Kirby) Hightower. His ancestors came to 
Mississippi from Virginia. William Hightower and Jessie 
Dawson, his ancestors, were soldiers of the Revolution. The 
father of the subject of this sketch was a soldier of the Con- 
federacy. Mr. Hightower received his primary education in 
the public schools of Grenada Coxinty; attended the Buena 
Vista Normal College in Chickasaw County, and was gradu- 
ated from that institution in 1889; established the Abbeville 
Normal College in 1889; taught in the Grenada Collegiate 
Institute; was professor of mathematics in 1891 ; abandoned 
teaching in 1894 on account of failing health; has .been en- 
gaged in fanning and stock raising since that time; elected 
Superintendent of Education of Lafayette County in 1895; 
elected to the House of Representatives from Lafayette 
Cotmty in 1899; elected Senator from the Thirty-second 
District November 3, 1903. Senator Hightower is a Demo- 
crat; member of the Methodist Church; Mason, Knight of 
Pythias and Woodman of the World; married February 11, 
1892, at Abbeville, Miss., to Sallie Pearl Bishop, daughter of 
Marion Pipkins Bishop and wife, Mary Elizabeth Beall. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hightower have one child, George Bishop. In the 
Senate of 1904-1908 Mr. Hightower was a member of the 
following committees: Finance, Agriculture, Commerce and 
Manufactures, Claims, Federal Relations, Joint Committee 
Universities and Colleges. Chairman of Special Joint Com- 
mittee for final Revision of Code of 1906. He was re-elected 
to the Senate from the Thirty-second District November 5 
1907- Was elected President of the Farmers' Union Janu- 
a^ry 3, 1908, and resigned his seat in the Senate January 2sth. 




George R. Hightower. 



ROBERT AARON DEAN, of Glenndale, was bom 
December 29, 1836, near Chulahoma, Marshall County, Miss., 
and is the son of Russell Dean and wife, Louisa Ann (Alsup) 
Dean. His paternal ancestors were English and Scotch; 
maternal Welch and Irish. His grandmother, Elizabeth 
(Edmondson) Dean, was the first white child bom in Hunts- 
ville, Ala. Robert Aaron Dean was educated in the private 
schools of Marshall County, Miss., and has been engaged in 
farming all his life. He was a member of the House of 
Representatives, 1878-1879, State Senate 1896-1906, and of 
the Constitutional Convention of 1890; in that body was 
Chairman of the Committee on Penitentiary, which abolished 
the convict-leasing system; he was a member of the Com- 
mission which supervised the erection of the new Capitol, 
1900-1903, and was elected to the Senate January 25, 1908, 
to succeed G. R. Hightower, resigned. In 1861 he enlisted 
as Orderly Sergeant in the Marshall Riflemen at Chulahoma. 
Marshall County, and was assigned to the 19th Mississippi 
Regiment of Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia, C. S. A.; 
was made Third Lieutenant in i86i. Second and First Lieuten- 
ant in 186a, and Captain and Major in 1863; at the close of 
the war was Major of the 19th Mississippi Regiment. Major 




Robert Aaron Dean. 



1018 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Dean is a Democrat, a member and Deacon in the Primitive 
Baptist Church, and Mason. He was married February a, 
1864, to Lucy Ann Langston, daughter of John McClure 
Langston and wife, Anner Hudspeth, of Lafayette County. 
Major and Mrs. Dean have eight children: Russell Langston, 
Thomas Greenwood, Joseph James, Robert Aaron, Jr., 
Louanner (Dean) Cavitt, Georgia (Dean) Waldrip, Minnie 
(Dean)_Davis and Hardy Mott. 




Calvin Brooks Vance. 




Benjamm D. Simpson. 



THIRTY-THIRD DISTRICT. 
Panola County. 

CALVIN BROOKS VANCE, of Batesville. was bom 
December 26, 1844, on a cotton plantation in Panola County, 
Miss., the son of Elisha Quinby Vance and wife, Cypressa C. 
(Brooks) Vance. His paternal ancestors came from Scotland 
to America before the Revolutionar>- War, first locating near 
Fredericksburg, Va. Subsequently part of the family moved 
to the Carolinas, whence the grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch moved to Kentucky, and his son came from that 
State to Panola County, Miss., in 1836. Mr. Vance obtained 
his early education at Panola schools, later studied at the 
Kentucky Military Institute and the University of Virginia, 
but left the last-named institution in 1861 to join a Missis- 
sippi regiment and go to the forefront of battle; he became 
a Lieutenant of Artillery; was commissioned Captain before 
the close of the struggle, and was severely wounded at the 
siege of Vicksburg. After the war, from 1864 to 1875, 
Mr. Vance was engaged in managing his plantation, and 
from 1875 to 1878 he was the editor of a newspaper; he 
is now President of the Bank of Batesville and is at the 
head of several local corporations. He still retains the old 
homestead, built in the *30s, which is in a good state of 
preservation and stands as a striking landmark and reminder 
of pioneer days. During the troubled days of reconstruction 
Mr. Vance was unceasingly active in his effort to break down 
carpet-bag rule and to restore honest government to the 
State. In 1876 he was made Brigadier-General of State 
Militia; from 1878 to 1880 he was a member of the State 
Senate. He is a Democrat, and has been several times 
Chairman of the County Executive Committee; he is Com- 
mander of his camp of United Confederate Veterans. He 
was married October 27, 18S9, in Chattanooga, Tenn., to 
Lida Butler, daughter of William Butler and wife, Mary 
Butler, of Memphis. Senator and Mrs. Vance have three 
children: Elisha Quinsby, Calvin Brooks. Jr., and John David. 
He was elected to the State Senate November 5, 1907. 

THIRTY-FOURTH DISTRICT. 
Coahoma, Tunica and Quitman Counties. 

BENJAMIN D. SIMPSON, of Marks. Quitman County 
was bom November 28, i860, at Pegram, Benton County. 
Miss., and is the son of Andrew S. Simpson and wife. Eleanor 
(Finley) Simpson; his paternal ancestors came to Missis- 
sippi from Tennessee; maternal from Virginia; father. 
Irish descent; mother, Scotch. Mr. Simpson attended the 
primary schools of Benton County; was at the luka Normal 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1010 



Institute one session ; studied law; was admitted to the bar 
in 1892; practiced at Ashland, Miss.; member of the 
Legislature, 1890, 1892; elected State Senator from Union, 
Tippah, Benton, Marshall and Tate Counties (Thirty-sixth 
District) November 3, 1903. Senator Simpson is a Demo- 
crat; Chairman of the County Committee. 1 896-1900; mem- 
ber of Methodist Church, Mason, and unmarried. In the 
Senate of 1904-1908 he was a member of the following com- 
mittees: Claims, Military, Registration and Elections, En- 
grossed Bills, Public Health and Quarantine and Insurance. 
He removed from Ashland to Marks, where he is now engaged 
in the practice of law; was elected to the State Senate 
November 5, 1907. 



THIRTY-FIFTH DISTRICT. 
DeSoto County. 

GEORGE LESLIE DARDEN, of Hernando, was bom 
November 21, 1879. near Lodi, in Sumner (now Webster) 
County, Miss. He is the son of Morgan Monroe Darden and 
wife, Josephine Elizabeth (Hurt) Darden. Paternal ances- 
tors came from Alabama, maternal from South Carolina; 
his father was a soldier in the Confederate Army, enlisting 
,at the age of eighteen; he moved to Mississippi soon after 
the close of the war. Mr. Darden obtained his education in 
the public schools, and early entered the field of journalism. 
He is now and has been since January i, 1903, publisher and 
proprietor of the Hernando Times-Promoter. He was a 
page in the National House of Representatives in the term 
of the Fifty-third Congress. He is a Democrat; in the pri- 
mary election of August, 1907, he received twenty votes 
more than the combined vote of three competitors for a seat 
in the State Senate; was elected to the Senate November 
S. 1907. He is a member of the Baptist Church, of the 
Masonic Order, the Protective Order of Elks and is Past 
Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. Senator Darden is 
unmarried. 




George Leslie Darden. 



THIRTY-SIXTH DISTRICT. 
Union, Tippah, Benton. Marshall and Tate Counties. 

WILLIAM JASPER EAST, of Senatobia, was bom 
September i. 1854, in Monroe County, Miss., and is the son 
of Josiah Robertson East and wife, .Matilda (Callahan) East. 
His ancestors came to America from England about 1740. 
and settled in Henrico County, Virginia. The father of the 
subject of this sketch was a soldier in the war for the inde- 
pendence of Texas, the Mexican War and the Civil War. 
and ser\-ing in the Buena Vista Hornets in the Confederate 
Army. Mr. East attended the primary schools of Panola 
County, under the instruction of Capt. J. A. Rainwater and 
others; entered the University of Mississippi in 1879 and 
pursued studies two years; tauglitin public schools two years; 
X studied law; admitted to the bar in 1883; located at Sena- 
tobia; Mayorof Senatobia. 1887-88; State Senator, 1892-94; 
member of House of Representatives from Tate County, 
1896, 1897, 1898; Presidential Elector. 1900; elected to 




r East. 



1020 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




the House November 3, 1903. Mr. East is a Democrat; 
member of the Episcopal Church; Mason and Knight of 
Pythias; was married July 12, 1892, to Lula Whitten, 
davighter of Patrick Henry Whitten and wife, Mary Hodgea. 
Mrs. East's father was a soldier of the Confederacy. Senator 
and Mrs. East have three children: Whitten, Fletcher and 
Lula. In the House of 1904-1908 Mr. East was a member 
of the following committees: Judiciary, Constitution, Regis- 
tration and Elections. He was elected to the Senate Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. 



HUGH KIRBY MAHON. of Holly Springs, was bom 
November i, 1870, in Marshall County, Miss., and is the son 
of Joseph Richard Mahon and Amanda Kirby Mahon. His 
father served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of 
Marshall County for sixteen years and twelve years of that 
time as President of the Board; was a Confederate soldier 
and his grandfather was a Captain in the Mexican War. 
Mr. Mahon attended the public and high schools of his 
county, obtaining the most of his education by close appli- 
cation to his books on his father's farm, where he was bom 
and reared. He took a commercial course at Memphis and 
was graduated in 1889, and entered the Law School of the 
Hugh Kirby Mahon. University of Mississippi and was graduated in 1898, having 

taken the regular two years' work with examination required 
for graduation in about six and one-half months ; began the 
practice of law at Holly Springs, Miss., his home county, in 
November, 1898; elected to the Legislature in 1899; re- 
elected in 1903, and was chosen Senator of his county No- 
vember 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, and has always been 
nominated by large majorities. He has taken a prominent 
, part in important legislation and has been untiring in his 
. - efforts to create a sentiment for agricultural progress in the 

State and laws pertaining to that interest, in which he has 
accomplished much, and secured the location of a State 
Agricultural Experiment Station for his county, which is 
specially for the benefit of North Mississippi. He served on 
some of the most important committees of the House and 
was chairman of special and subcommittees; at his first 
term he was a member of tthe Bryan reception committee 
when Mr. Br>'an visited the State by invitation of that body. 
He is a member of the Presbyterian Church; member of the 
United Sons of Confederate Veterans; member of the 
Southern Cotton Growers' Association; served as Chancellor 
Commander of his Lodge. Knights of P>'thias, and Consul 
Commander of his Camp, Woodmen of the World and Elk. 
Married December 19, 1898. to Mary Walker Gatewood, 
daughter of Capt. Lafayette Gatewood and wife. Mary 
Walker. Senator and Mrs. Mahon have one child, Hugh 
K., Jr, 




SAMUEL JOSEPH OWEN, of New Albany, was bom 
December 30, 1S67, at Blue Mountain. Tippah Countv, 
Miss., the son of William Owen and wife, Caroline (Sargeant) 
Owen. His paternal ancestors came originally from Vir- 
ginia, and from that State the family scattered to Kentucky, 

\ the Carolinas and Alabama, later to Mississippi and the 

[ Samuel Joseph Owen. Southwest, Mr. Owen's father was a native of Alabama; 

\ 

I 



t 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1021 



his mother of Mississippi. The subject of this sketch 
attended the public schools in youth, but as his father died 
when he was in his early teens, leaving him the oldest of 
three children and his mother's main dependence, he had no 
opportunity for collegiate or professional education. He 
has been in politics more or less since he was about twenty- 
three years of age; was Clerk of Circuit Court of Tippah 
County 1892-95; Mayor of the town of Ripley, 1898-99; 
Floater Representative in Mississippi Legislature, Benton 
and Tippah Counties, 1900-03; was elected to the State 
Senate November 5, 1907. He tried the newspaper business 
for a time, owned and edited the Southern Sentinel at Rip- 
ley from 1896 to 1901; when he sold this out he entered the 
Oiercantile business; was in stores at Ripley and Blue Moun- 
tain; then with others organized the Union Mercantile 
Company of New Albany, in which he is now a director. 
He is % Democrat; a member of the Missionary Baptist 
Church; a Deacon since he was twenty-four years of age, 
and always prominent in Sunday-school work; is Consul 
Commander of Woodmen of the "World. He was married 
September 9, 1891, at Blue Mountain to Lilla David Mc- 
Ateer, daughter of John David McAteer and wife, Sallie 
(Dimcan) McAteer. His wife's ancestors came from Georgia 
and the Carolinas. Senator- and Mrs. Owen have eight 
children: 'James Robert, William Luther, Lilla Blanche, 
Sara Lynne, John Sargeant, Mamie Wilmouth, Samuel 
Joseph, Jr., and Alma Louise. Mr. Owen has always been 
an ardent prohibitionist, active in the suppression of "blind 
tigers," and other forms of lawlessness; was Secretary of 
the Law and Order Leagrue formed in his community some 
ten years ago. 



THIRTY-SEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Tishomingo, Alcorn and Prentiss Counties. 

JAMES ANDY CUNNINGHAM, of Booneville, was bom 
February 9, 1874, at New Site, Prentiss County, Miss., and 
is the son of Andy Cunningham and wife, Fannie (Finch) 
Cunningham. The father of the subject of this sketch was 
a soldier of the Confederacy, and served as a private in the 
Twenty-sixth Mississippi Regiment. Mr. Cunningham 
attended the primary schools of Prentiss County, under the 
instruction of George ^L Denson. C. Elliott Billingsley and 
Perry G. Wright, after he had passed his nineteenth year; 
entered Oakland College, Itawamba County, Miss., and was 
graduated in 1898 with the B. S. degree; attended luka 
Normal College 1901-02; became a teacher in 1897; taught 
in public schools two years, two years in Oakland College 
and luka Normal, and two years in Marietta Normal; elected 
to the Legislature from Prentiss County, November 3, 1903. 
Senator Cunningham is a Democrat; member and Steward 
of the Methodist Church: Mason and Knight of Pythias. 
In the House of 1904-190S Mr. Cunningham was a member 
of the following committees: Benevolent Institutions, Con- 
stitution, Public Education, Insurance, and Public Buildings 
and Grounds. He was elected to the State Senate Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. Senator Cunningham was married April 10, 
1904, to Callie Floyd at Booneville, Miss., daughter of James 




James A. Cunningham. 



1022 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

B. and Sallie Floyd. Mr. and Mrs. Cunninyham have two 
children: Floyd W. and Edith. He was graduated from 
Millsaps College Law School in 1906, and is now engaged in 
the practice of his profession at Booneville. 







William Dozier Anderson. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH DISTRICT. 
Monroe, Lee and Itawamba Counties. 

WILLIAM DOZIER ANDERSON, of Tupelo, Lee 
County, Miss., son of Charles Wesley Anderson and Mary R. 
(Dozier) Anderson, was bom July 23, 1862, at Cedar Grove, 
Pontotoc County, Miss. He is a lineal descendant of Andrew 
Anderson, who was of Scotch ancestry and came from Ire- 
land to America and settled in Augusta County, Va. Wil- 
liam Anderson, son of Andrew Anderson, was a Captain in 
the Revolutionary Army, and after the war removed from 
Virginia and settled at Logan's Fort, Lincoln County, Ky. 
He was the father of Charles Anderson, who removed from 
Kentucky to Maury County, Tenn., and married Margaret 
Russell, a sister of Capt. John Russell, who was with Jack- 
son during the Indian wars. He removed from Tennessee 
to North Alabama in the early part of the nineteenth century 
and settled near Courtland, and later came to Pontotoc Coun- 
ty, Miss. His son, Charles Wesley Anderson, was the father 
of William Dozier Anderson. William Dozier Anderson's 
mother was a daughter of Dr. J. M. Dozier, of South Caro- 
lina, who was of Huguenot ancestry. His mother was a 
Miss Gale, sister of Governor Gale, of Alabama, and his 
grandmother was a Miss Billups. He married Louisa Gray 
while a resident of Alabama. His father was a soldier of 
the Revolution and kept a diary, which is still in the family. 
William Dozier Anderson received his early educational 
training at Birmingham, Lee County, Miss., after which 
he attended Central University at Richmond, Ky. He 
studied law at the University of Mississippi, sessions of 1881 
and 1 88?, and later stood the bar examination and was ad- 
mitted to practice, locating at Tupelo, where he has since re- 
mained. He is City and County Attorney; attorney for the 
M. &0. R. R.; was Alderman of Tupelo one term and Mayor 
from 1899 to 1907. He was a member of the Mississippi Legis- 
lature in 1898. filling the imexpired term of Col. Wilson as 
Floater Representative of Lee and Itawamba Counties; 
was a member of Judiciary and Ways and Means Commit- 
tees. He was nominated for Presidential Elector for the 
State at large in 1904, but declined, as his acceptance would 
have been unconstitutional, since he already held office. 
Governor Longino appointed him special Judge of the Su- 
preme Court in Judge Calhoon's place, and appointed by 
Governor Vardaman special Judge in the Circuit Court at 
Booneville in 1906. He has served as delegate to the Demo- 
cratic State Convention for many years; is a Director of the 
Mississippi Bar Association; has been Chairman of the 
Democratic Executive Committee for ten years; is a deacon 
in the Presbyterian Church and is a member c-f Kni^rhts of 
Pythias and Knights of Honor. On November 5, 190:. he 
was elected to the State Senate. Senator Anderson was 
married to Lena Bell Clayton, daughter of W. L. Clayton 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1023 



and wife, Agnes Bell, of Tupelo, January 37. 1886. They 
have five children: Clayton. John Russell, Maiy Agnes, 
Lena Bell and Charles. 



GEORGE JABEZ LEFTWICH, of Aberdeen, was bom 
September 18, 1859, at Blacksburg, Montgomery County, 
Virginia, the son of Jabez Leftwich and Mary - (Switzer) 
Leftwich. His paternal ancestors came from Cheshire, 
England, and settled in Eastern Virginia when that com- 
monwealth was a colony; later they made their home in 
Bedford County, Va., whence they became scattered. Col. 
Jabez Leftwich, great-grandfather of the subject of- this 
sketch, was an officer under his brother. General Joel Left- 
wich, in the War of 1812; he was subsequently a member 
of Congress from Virginia, and in 1825 emigrated to Hunts- 
ville, Ala.; his wife was Martha Jane Early, a cousin of 
General Jubal A. Early. Mr. Leftwich attended in youth 
the free schools of Virginia, and the high school at Fincastle, 
Va. He entered the National Normal University of Lebanon, 
Ohio, to prepare himself for teaching, graduated there in 
1882 with degree of A. B.; attended law lectures at the 
University of Virginia and at Cornell University, but did 
not complete a course in either institution. He was princi- 
pal of the township high school at Grayville, 111., one year, 
and of the high school at Carthage, Miss., five years; then, 
in 1 888, began the practice of law at Aberdeen. He was one 
of the firm of Gilleylen and Leftwich for fifteen years; this 
firm name is now Leftwich and Tubb. He is a Democrat; 
was Commissioner of Elections for his county for several 
years; is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and was a 
lay delegate to the General Conference of the Church at 
Baltimore in 1898, and that at Birmingham in 1906, He 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and the Order of 
Elks, also of the Mississippi Historical Society; frequently 
prepares papers for that society and writes for periodicals 
and magazines. Mr. Leftwich has been prominently identi- 
fied with the prohibition movement in his county; was also 
active in the movement for a primary election and the 
overthrow of the plan of candidate election by party con- 
ventions. Was elected -to the State Senate November 5, 
1907. He was married near Princeton, Ky., December 27, 
1887, to Elgenia Groom, daughter of William G. Groom and 
wife, Martha A. Groom. His wife's family were descended 
from Virginian pioneer planters. Senator and Mrs. Left- 
wich have si.x. children: Mary Marguerite, Katie Elgenia, 
George Jabez, Jr., Bessie Louise, William Groom and Frank 
Switzer. 



ro^; 




George Jabez Leftwich. 



REPRESENTATIVES 78TH SESSION. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOUSE. 

Speaker H. M. Street 

Clerk L. Pink Smith 

Journal Clerk Lee J. Wilson 

Sergeant-at-Arms W. E. Caffee 

Postmistress Mrs. Annie Glass 

Doorkeepers :. U. H.Tompkins and W. R. Hoover 

Stenographers Misses Madie Fitzgerald and Nettie Ratliff 

Pages Marvin Stainton,, Holloway Bird, Jake Myers, Albert 

O. Mitchell, Lewis Whitson, Solon Dobbs, Edward Wright, Hoke 

Frazier and James K. Vardaman, Jr. 

REPRESENTATIVES. 

Adams — :W. A. Killingsworth, Cannonsburg; Israel N. Moses, Natchez * 

Alcorn — S. M. Nabors, Rienzi; W. T. Bennett, Corinth. 

Amite — Eugene Gerald, Smithdale; C. L. Fenn, Smithdale, 

Attala — D. C. Bailey, Ayres; J. J. Britt, Bolatusha. 

Benton — R. M, Frazier, Hickory Flat. 

Bolivar— C. R. Smith, Cleveland; George B. Shelby, Shelby. 

Calhoun — J. B. Going, Pittsboro; W. J. Patterson, Pittsboro. 

Carroll—T. O. Yewell, Carrollton; S. S. Monday, North Carrollton. 

Chickasaw — Frank Burkitt, Okolona; J. A. Lewis, Houston. 

Choctaw — C. A. Lindsey, Eupora. 

Claiborne — R. B. Anderson, Port Gibson. 

Clarke — A. Johnston, Shubuta. 

Clay—]. C. Bridges, Pheba; J. P. Valentine, Pheba. 

Coahoma — O. G. Johnston, Friars Point; Will A. Alcorn, Jr., Clarks- 
dale. 

Copiah— C. E. Hood, Dentville; W. W. Robertson, Wesson; W. B. 
Miller, Hazlehurst. 

Covington — W. L. Cranford, Seminary. 

DeSoto — E. J. Pollard, Hernando; J. H. Simpson, Watson. 

Forrest — S. V. Robertson, Hattiesburg. 

Franklin — M. H. Jones, Little Springs. 

Greene — E. W. Breland, Leakesville. 

Grenada — S. A. Morrison, Grenada. 

Hancock — E. J. Gex, Bay St. Louis. 

Harrison — J, B. Clark, Nugent. 

(1024) 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 1025 

Hinds — H. M. Quin, Jackson; M. Ney Williams, Raymond; S. A. D. 
Greaves, Asylum P. O. 

Holmes — J. B. Mitchell, Goodman; L. S. Rogers, West; J. A. Dicken 
Durant. 

Issaquena — L. Peyton, Mayersville. 

Itawamba — J. F. Dison, Eastman. 

Jackson — M. A. Dees, Scranton. 

Jasper — M. A. Lewis, Missionary. 

Jefferson Davis — J. O. Co wart, Prentiss. 

Jefferson — J. E. Lamb, Union Church. 

Jones — L. Stainton, Laurel. 

Kemper — G. J. Rencher, DeKalb; S. M. Graham, Oak Grove, 

Lafayette— h. M. Russell, Oxford; C. E. Slough, Oxford. 
. Lamar — J. L. Br^-ant, Baxterville. 

Lauderdale — Joe D. Stennis, Bailey; W. R. Denton, Hookston; H. M. 
Street, Meridian. 

Lawrence — Lee H. Bird, Tryus. j 

Leake — L. A. Zachry, Lena. ' 

Lee — George H. Hill, Jr., Tupelo; F. A. Greene, Verona ~ j 

Leflore—]. A. Tyson, Greenwood. 1 

Lincoln — M. McCullough, Brookhaven. j 

Lowndes — T. A. Stinson, Columbus; W. R. Moody, Columbus; B. G. ; 
Hull, R. F. D. x\o. 3, Columbus. j 

Madison — R. W. Stewart, Madison; John B. Martin, Cameron. 1 

Marion — A. L. Yates, Columbia. ) 

Marshall — C. H. Curd, Holly Springs; W. H. King, Tasca; John • 
Calhoon, Holly Springs. ^ \ 

Monroe — H. F. Broyles, Greenwood Springs; D. A. Beeks, R. F. D. 
No. 2, Aberdeen; T. R. Caldwell, R. F. D., Amory. 

Montgomery — Sid L Robinson, Winona. 

Neshoba — A. D. Sharpe, Engine. 

Newton — J. D. Carr, Newton; M. P. Foy, Decatur. 

Noxubee — E. D. Cavett, Macon; M. O'Byrne, Macon; L L. Dorroh, 
Macon. 

Oktibbeha— "^ . Q. Adams, Sturges; J. H. Wellborn, Starkville. 

Panola — W. E. Davis, Como; J. M. Cox, Batesville; L. C. Johnson, 
Reynolds. 

Pearl River — J. C. Shivers, Poplarville. 

Perry — D. K. McDonald, New Augusta. 

Pike—G. H. Alford, Magnolia; L. W. Felder. Felder's P. O. 

Pontotoc — W. T. Stegall, Pontotoc; J. L Longest, Troy. 

Prentiss — W. A. White, Booneville; J. H. Gardner, Boonevill*-. 

Quitman — J. B. Stone, Belen. 

Rankin — A. G. Norrell, Plain; W. D. Heslep, Pelahatchie. 

Scott — OHver Mcllhenny, Forest. 

Sharkey — B. Goodman, Cary. 

Simpson— V^'. M. Lofton, MendenhaU. 
33 



1026 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Smith— IL. G. Robinson, Raleigh (deceased); J. J. Terry. 

Sunflower — C. P. Adair, Indianola. 

Tate — Walker Wood, Senatobia; Herbert Holmes, Senatobia. 

Tallahatchie — John N. SuUivant, Teasdale. 

Tippah — S. O. Love, Ripley. 

Tishomingo — M. D. Adams, luka. 

Tunica — Charles Doherty, Tunica. 

Union — G. L. Jones, New Albany; A. J. Jones, Myrtle. 

Warren — J. J. O'Neill, Vicksburg; T. R. Foster, Vicksburg; George 
R. Hawkins, Bovina. 

Washington — J. H. Nelms, Greenville; Van B. Boddie, Greenville; 
N. W. Sumrall, Belzoni. 

Wayne — E. W. Stewart, Waynesboro. 

Webster— T. R. Langston, Walthall. 

Wilkinson — ^\V. J. Stockett, Woodville; S. R. Jones, Centreville. 

Winston — O. A. Bennett, Louisville. 

Yalobusha — J. L. Harris, Water Valley; J. R. Coleman, Velma. 

Yazoo — Will H. Hudson, Yazoo City; Theo.. Schmidt, Yazoo City; 
C. J. Burrus, Yazoo City. 



FLOATER REPRESENTATIVES. 

Franklin and Lincoln — R. E. Bennett, Meadville. 
Tippah and Benton — A. C. Anderson, Ripley. 
Claiborne and Jefferson — J. F. Frierson, Port Gibson. 
Clarke and Jasper — J. D. Fartherree, Quitman. 
Grenada and Montgomery — M. H. Allen, Winona. 
Leake and Winston — W. B. Woodall, Noxapater. 
Harrison and Jackson — Horace Bloomfield, Gulfport. 
Yazoo and Hinds — Charles Perkins, Yazoo City. 
Lee and Itawamba — W. S. Sheffield, Dorsev. 



STANDING HOUSE COMMITTEES. 

Judiciary — Quin, Chairman; Jones, G. L., of Union, Tyson, Alcorn, 
Mcllhenny, Morrison, McCullough, Boddie, Frierson, Russell, Yewell, 
Fatherree, Anderson of Claiborne, Rencher, Stewart of Wayne, Miller, 
Bird, Gex, Johnston of Coahoma', Holmes, Hill, Shelby. Shivers, OXeill, 
Bloomfield, Carr, Foy, Robertson of Forrest, Yates, McDonald. Pollard, 
Williams, Dorroh. Sumrall, Stockett, Slough, Harris. Bennett of Alcorn, 
Bennett of Lincoln and Franklin, Lofton, Graham, Cranford, Co wart. 

Appropriations — Morrison, Chairman; Alcorn, Stinson^ Stainton. 
Smith, Burkitt, Greene, Foster, Rogers, Calhoun, Nelms, Johnston of 
Clarke, Killingsworth, Longest, Simpson, Cavett. Goodman, Jones. A. J., 
of Union, Frierson, Lindsay, Shivers, Hudson, Wellborn, Patterson. 
Peyton, Denton, Dees, Adair, Clark, Sullivant. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. ' 1027 

Liqtior Traffic — Anderson of Tippah and Benton, Chairman; Norrell, 
Foster, Adams of Oktibbeha, Broyles, Killingsworth, Cavett, Johnston 
of Clarke, Bloomfield, Jones, G. L., of Union, Nabors, McCullough, Doh- 
erty, Xelms, Alford, Gex, Bailey, Dison, Gerald, Shelby, Lewis of Chrck- 
asiiw. 

Education — Burkitt, Chairman; Frierson, Jones, G. L., of Union, 
Stainton, Bird, Cox, Adams of Tishomingo, McCullough, Stinson, Nabors, 
Valentine, Morrison, Smith, Terry, Coleman, Foy, Hood, Felder, Sullivant, 
Killingsworth, Robertson of Montgomery, Martin, Curd, Perkins, Sharp, 
Gerald, Going, Dison, McDonald. 

County Affairs — Stinson, Chairman; Breland, Patterson, Jones, A. J., 
of Union, Dees, Yates, Perkins, Peyton, Robinson of Montgom.ery, Gard- 
ner, Going, Felder, Foy, Hudson, Allen. 

Railroads — Foster, Chairman; Dees, Dison, Greaves, Burkitt, Miller, 
Boddie, Mitchell, Moody, Alford, Doherty, Shelby, Fenn, Rencher, Nabors, 
Wood, Moses, Hudson, Bloomfield, Sumrall, Stegall, Robertson of For- 
rest, Harris, McDonald, Jones of Wilkinson. 

Engrossed Bills — Yates, Chairman; Nabors, Holmes, Jones of Frank- 
lin, Britt, Going, Bennett of Winston. 

Registration and Elections — Stainton, Chairman; Bennett of Franklin 
and Lincoln, Britt, Cowart, Davis, Greaves, Lofton, Stegall, Zachry, 
Hood, Slough, Johnson of Panola, Sumrall, Nabor-s, Langston. 

Public Printing — Robertson of Copiah, Chairman; Anderson of Tip- 
pah, Curd, Wood, Going, Harris, HulU Wellborn, Bennett of Alcorn, 
Rencher, Carr, Gerald, Woodall, Jones of Franklin, Johnson of Panola, \ 

Bryant, Cowart, Perkins, Bennett of Winston. 

Municipalities — Calhoun, Chairman; Russell, Johnson of Coahoma, 
Dorroh, Quin. Alford, Yates, McDonald, Shelby, Hill, Moody. 

Pensions — Denton, Chairman; Sheffield, Stinson, Lewis of Chickasaw, ! 

Langston, Allen, Adams of Oktibbeha, Heslep, Caldwell, Fenn, W^ood, I 

Love, Monday, Patterson, Bennett of Winston. J 

Penitentiary — Mcllhenny, Chairman; Carr, Beeks, Breland, Lamb, ] 

Alford, White, Jones, A. J., of Union, Monday, Valentine, Martin, Bridges, -j 

Dorroh, Hull, Burrus, Hood, Cox, Anderson of Tippah and Benton. | 

Roads, Ferries and Bridges — Dees, Chairman; Breland, Hawkins, i 

Sullivant. Bird, Broyles, Stewart of Wayne, Schmitt, Valentine, Woodall, ,' 

Zachry. Dicken, Cranford, Cowart, O'Byme. I 

Propositions and Grievances — Perkins, Chairman; Jones, G. L., of | 

Union, Quin, Stennis, Morrison, Burkitt, Alcorn. j 

Manufactures — Sheflield, Chairman; Clark, Dees, Frazier, Zachry ] 

Woodall, Felder, Valentine, Iving. j 

Military Affairs — Caldwell, Chairman; Foy, Cavelt. Smith, Stegall, ■ 

Sharj>. Yates, Dicken, Bennett of Winston, Johnson of Pancla, Jones of 
Frankliti. j 

Federal Relations — Yewell, Chairman; Cox, Hull, Moses. Johnston of ; 

Coahoma, Frazier, Wood, Bennett of Alcorn, Miller, Cranford, Johnson j 

of Panola. 



1028 ^ LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Claims — Stewart of Madison, Chairman; Lewis of Chickasaw, Robert- 
son of Forrest, Patterson, Terry, Love, Felder, McDonald, Bennett of 
Winston, Dison, Stegall. 

Public Buildings and Grounds — Killingsworth, Chairman; Greaves, 
Cox, Dees, Sheffield, Wellborn, Bridges, Allen, Lamb. 

Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping — Bloomfield, Chairman; Cox, Clark, 
Dees, Yates, Robertson of Forrest, McDonald. 

Public Lands — Bird, Chairman; Bennett of Winston, Nelms, Allen, 
Fatherree, Lofton, Patterson, Lewis of Jasper, Br^'ant, Terry. 

Immigration and Labor — Boddie, Chairman; Davis, Doherty, Dorroh, 
Fenn, Moody, Stone, Hudson, Robertson of Copiah, Hawkins, Wellborn, 
Fatherree, Cranford, Clark, Monday. 

Census and Apportionment — McCullough, Chairman; Fejder, Hood, 
Curd, Jones of Franklin, Going, Broyles, Hull, Green, Love, A. J. Jones 
of Union, Williams, Moses, Heslep, Harris, Johnson of Panola, Gardner. 

Executive Contingent Funds — Hood, Chairman; Mitchell, Slough, 
Yates, Gerald. 

Corporations — Tyson, Chairman; Stennis, Carr, Miller, Boddie, Smith, 
Johnson of Coahoma, Stockett, Longest, Shivers, Robertson of Forrest, 
Adams of Oktibbeha, Doherty, Davis, Sumrall, Woodall, Lofton, McDon- 
ald, Patterson. 

Contingent Expenses — Rencher, Chairman; A. J. Jones of Union, 
Hawkins, Harris, Robinson of Montgomery, Frazier, Wood. 

Agrictdture — Mitchell, Chairman; Britt, Russell, Yewell, Gardner, 
Burrus, Anderson of Tippah and Benton, Alford, Bailey, Stegall, Beeks, 
Sheffield, Adams of Tishomingo, Nabors, O'Byme, Cox, Hawkins. 

Banks and Banking — Nelms, Chairman; Alcorn, Rogers, Moses, Smith, 
Clarke, Adair, Yewell, Cox, Pollard, O'Neill. 

Rules — Speaker Street, Chairman; Quin, G. L. Jones of Union, 
Alcorn, Tyson. 

Local and Private Legislation — Norrell, Chairman; G. L. Jones of 
Union, Anderson of Claiborne, Burkitt, Stewart of Wayne, Caldwell, 
O'Neill. 

Public Health and Quarantine — Rogers, Chairman; Goodman, Broyles, 
Stone, Greaves, Bloomfield, Bennett of Franklin and Lincoln, Moses, 
Jones of Wilkinson. 

Fees and Salaries — Johnston of Clarke, Chairman; Smith, Adair, 
Slough, Stegall, Hill, Denton, Miller, Dicken, Clarke, Jones of Wilkinson, 
Davis, Pollard, Holmes, Robertson of Copiah. 

Insurance — Cavett, Chairman; Norrell, Burrus, Tyson, Calhoun, 
Doherty, O'Neill, Quin, Stainton, Gerald, Green, Robertson of Forrest, 
Williams, Gardner, O'Byme. 

Ways and M?ans — Stennis. Chairman; Tyson, Anderson of Claiborne. 
Boddie, Goodman, Breland, Bridges, Shivers, Stewart of Madison, Stockett. 
Mitchell, Sheffield, Schmitt, Caldwell, Mcllhenny, Green. Greaves, Lamb. 
Moses, Moody, Fatherree, Lindsey, Robertson of Copiah, Pollard, Lewis 
of Jasper, Davis, Curd, White, Sharp.' 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 1029 

Mississippi Levees — Alcorn, Chairman; Goodman, Boddie, Shelby, 
Tyson, Doherty, Adair, Mitchell, Burrus, Simpson, Peyton, Stone, Sulli- 
vant, Nelms, Smith, Johnson of Coahoma, Sumrall, Schmitt, Pollard. 

Enrolled Bills — Martin, Chairman; Hull, Miller, Going, Holmes, 
Graham, Hill, Felder, Wood^ Harris, Jones of Franklin. 

Constitution — Jones, G. L., of Union, Chairman; Alcorn, Ye well, 
Anderson of Tippah and Benton, Gex, Foster, Bloomfield, McCullough, 
Slough, Bailey, Robertson of Forrest. 



JOINT COMMITTEES. 

Eleemosynary Institutions — Broyles, Chairman; Goodman, Rogers, 
Stone, Norrell, Calhoun, Miller, Britt, Yewell, Vv'oodall, Frazier, Longest, 
Foster, Denton, Shivers, Lewis of Jasper, Stockett, Doherty, Williams, 
White, Quin, Stewart of Madison, Hull, Simpson, Bryant. 

Universities and Colleges — Russell, Chairman; Bridges, Killingsworth ; 
Holmes, Stennis, Hill, Bird, Slough, Yates, Robinson of Montgomery, 
Graham, Wellborn, Stinson. 

Library — Miller, Chairman; O'Neill, Dorroh, Shelby, Hill. 

To Investigate State Offices — Jones, A. J., of Union, Chairman; Hood, 
Breland, Bennett of Winston, Jones of Franklin. 

Mileage — Burkitt, Chairman; Nelms, Sheffield, Curd, Felder. 



COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS. 

Adair — Appropriations, Banks and Banking, Fees and Salaries, 
Mississippi Levees. 

Adams of Oktibbeha— Liquor Traffic, Pensions, Corporations. 

Adams of Tishomingo — Education, Agriculture. 

Alcorn — Judiciary, Appropriations, Propositions and Grievances, 
Banks and Banking, Rules, Mississippi Levees (Ch.), Constitution. 

Alford — Liquor Traffic, Railroads, Municipalities, Penitentiary, 
Agriculture. | 

Allen — County Affairs, Pensions, Public Buildings and Grounds, 
Public Lands. - j 

Anderson of Claiborne — Judiciary, Local and Private Legislation, 
Ways and Means. | 

Anderson of Tippah and Benton — Liquor Traffic (Ch.>, PubHc Print- ■ 
ing. Penitentiary, Agriculture, Constitution. j 

Bailey — Liquor Traffic, Agriculture, Constitution. j 

Beeks — Penitentiary, Agriculture. ■ 

Bennett of Alcorn — Judiciary, Public Printing, Federal Relations. 

Bennett of Franklin and Lincoln — Judiciary, Registrations and 
Elections, PubHc Health and Quarantine. 

Bennett of Winston — Engrossed Bills, Public Printing, Pensions, 
Military Affairs, Claims, Public Land, To Investigate State Offices. 



1030 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Bird — Judiciary, Education, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Public 
Lands (Ch.), Universities and Colleges. 

Bloomfield — Judiciary, Liquor Traffic, Railroads, Fisheries, Com- 
merce and Shipping (Ch.), Public Health and Quarantine, Constitution. 

BoDDiE — Judiciary, Railroads, Immigration and Labor (Ch.), Cor- 
porations, Ways and Means, Mississippi Levees. 

Breland — County Affairs, Penitentiary, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, 
Ways and" Means, To Investigate State Offices. 

Bridges — Penitentiary, Public Buildings and Grounds, Ways and 
Means, Universities and Colleges. 

Britt — Engrossed Bills, Registrations and Elections, Agriculture, 
Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Broyles — Liquor Traffic, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Census and 
Apportionments, Public Health and Quarantine, Eleemosynary Institu- 
tions (Ch.). 

Bryant — Public Printing, Public, Land, Eleemosynary Institutions. 
. BuRKiTT — Appropriations, Education (Ch.), Railroads, Propositions 
and Grievances, Local and Private Legislation, Mileage (Ch.). 

BuRRUs — Penitentiary, Agriculture, Insurance, Mississippi Levees. 

Caldwell — Penitentiary, Military Affairs (Ch.), Local and Private 
Legislation, Ways and Means. 

Calhoon — Appropriations, Municipalities (Ch.), Insurance, Elee- 
mosynary Institutions. 

Carr — Judiciary, Public Printing, Penitentiary, Corporations. 

Cavett — Appropriations, Liquor Traffic, Military Affairs, Insur- 
ance (Ch.). 

Clark — Appropriations, Manufactures, Fisheries, Commerce and 
Shipping, Immigration and Labor, Banks and Banking, Fees and Salaries. 

Coleman — Banks and Banking, Local and Private Legislation, Edu- 
cation. 

CowART — Judiciary, Registrations and Elections, Public Printing, 
Roads, Ferries and Bridges. 

Cox — Education, Penitentiary, Federal Relations, Public Buildings 
and Grounds, Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping, Agriculture, Banks 
and Banking. 

Cranford — Judiciary, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Federal Relations, 
Immigration and Labor. 

Curd — Education, Public Printing, Census and Apportionment, Ways 
and Means, Mileage. 

Davis — Registrations and Elections, Immigration and Labor, Cor- 
porations, Fees and Salaries, Ways and Means. 

Dees — Appropriations, County AtTairs, Railroads, Roads, Ferries 
and Bridges (Ch.), Manufactures, Public Buildings and Grounds, Fisheries, 
Commerce and__Shipping. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 1031 

Denton — Appropriations, Pensions (Ch.), Fees and Salaries, Elee- 
mosynary Institutions. 

DiCKEN — Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Military Affairs, Fees and 
Salaries. 

DisoN — Liquor Traffic, Education, Railroads, Claims. 

DoHERTY — Liquor Traffic,- Railroads, Immigration and Labor, Cor- 
porations, Insurance, Mississippi Levees, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

DoRROH — Judiciary, Municipalities, Penitentiary, Immigration and 
Labor, Library. 

Fatherree — Judiciary, Public Lands, Immigration and Labor, Ways 
and Means. 

Felder — Education, County Affairs, Manufactures, Claims, Census 
and Apportionment, Enrolled Bills, Mileage. 

Fenn— Railroads, Pensions, Immigration and Labor. 

Foster — Appropriations, Liquor Traffic, Railroads (Ch.), Constitu- 
tion, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

FoY — Judiciary, Education, County Affairs, Military Affairs. 

Frazier — Manufactures, Federal Relations, Contingent Expenses, 
Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Frierson — Judiciary, Appropriations, Education. 

Gardner — County Affairs, Census and Apportionment, Agriculture, 
Insurance. 

Gerald — Liquor Traffic, Education, Public Printing, Executive Con- 
tingent Funds," Insurance. 

Gex — Judiciary, Liquor Traffic, Constitution. 

Going — Education, County Affairs, Engrossed Bills, Public Printing, 
Census and Apportionments, Enrolled Bills. 

Goodman — Appropriations, Public Health and Quarantine, Ways and 
Means, Mississippi Levees, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Graham — Judiciary, Enrolled Bills, Universities and Colleges. 

Greaves — Railroads, Registrations and Elections, Public Buildings 
and Grounds, Public Health and Quarantine, Ways and Means. 

Greene — Appropriations, Census and Apportionment ^ Insurance, 
Ways and Means. 

Harris — Judiciary, Railroads, Public Printing, Census and Apportion- 
ment, Contingent Expenses, Enrolled Bills. 

Hawkins — Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Immigration and Labor, Con- 
tingent Expenses, Agriculture. 

Heslep — Pensions, Census and Apportionments. 

Hill — Judiciary, Municipalities, Fees and Salaries, Enrolled Bills, 
Universities and Colleges, Library. 

Holmes — Judiciary, Engrossed Bills, Fees and Salaries, Enrolled Bills, 
Universities and Colleges. 

Hood — Education, Registrations and Elections, Penitentiary, Census 
and Apportionment, Executive Contingent Funds (Ch.), To Investigate 
State Offices. 



■ 1032 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

f Hudson — Appropriations, County Affairs, Railroads, Immigration and 

[ Labor. 

[ Hull — Public Printing, Penitentiary, Federal Relations, Census and 

I Apportionments, Enrolled Bills, Eleemosynary Institutions, 
! Johnston of Clarke — Appropriations, Liquor Traffic, Fees and 

I Salaries (Ch.)- 

i Johnson of Panola — Registrations and Elections, Public Printing, 

[ Military Affairs, Federal Relations, Census and Apportionments. 
• Johnston of Coahoma — Judiciary, Municipalities, Federal Relations, 

Corporations, Mississippi Levees. 

Jones of Franklin — Engrossed Bills, Public Printing, Military Affairs, 

! Census and Apportionments Enrolled Bills, To Investigate State Offices. 

I Jones, A. J., of Union — Appropriations, County Affairs, Penitentiary, 

*f Census and Apportionments, Contingent Expenses, Rules, Local and 

Private Legislation, To Investigate State Offices (Ch.). 

Jones, G. L., of Union — Judiciary, Liquor Traffic, Education, Con- 
l stitution (Ch.), Propositions and Grievances. 

L Jones of Wilkinson — Railroads, Public Health and Quarantine, Fees 

I and Salaries. 
' KiLLiNGswoRTH — Appropriations, Liquor Traffic, Education, Public 

Buildings and Grounds, Universities and Colleges. 
1- " King — Manufactures, Agriculture, Penitentiary. 

I ' Lamb — Penitentiary, Public Buildings and Grounds, Ways and Means. 

Langston — Registrations and Elections, Pensions. 
Lewis of Chickasaw — Liquor Traffic, Pensions, Claims. 
I Lewis of Jasper — Public Lands, Ways and Means, Eleemosynary 

\ Institutions. 

LiNDSEY — Appropriations, Ways and Means. 

Lofton — Judiciary, Registrations and Elections, Public Lands, Cor- 
porations. 

Longest — Appropriations, Corporations, Eleemosynary Institutions. 
Love — Pensions, Claims, Census and Apportionments. 
Martin — Education, Penitentiary, Enrolled Bills (Ch.). 
McCuLLouGH — Judiciary, Liquor Traffic, Education. Census and 
Apportionment (Ch.), Constitution. 

McDonald — Judiciary, Education, Railroads, Municipalities, Claims, 
Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping, Corporations, 

McIlhenny — Judiciary, Penitentiary (Ch.), Ways and Means. 
Miller — Judiciary, Railroads, Federal Relations, Corporations, Fees 
and Salaries, Enrolled Bills, Eleemosynary Institutions, Library (Ch.). 
Mitchell — Railroads, Executive Contingent Funds, Agriculture (Ch.), 
Ways and Means, Mississippi Levees. 

Moody — Railroads, Municipalities, Immigration and Labor, Ways 
and Means. 

Monday — Pensions, Penitentiary, Immigration and Labor 
Morrison — Judiciary, Appropriations (Ch.), Education, Propositions 
and Grievances. 






I 



^ LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 1033 

Moses — Railroads, Federal Relations, Census and Apportionment. 
Banks and Banking, Public Health and Quarantine, Ways and Means. 

Nabors — Liquor Traffic, Education, Railroads, Engrossed Bills, Regis- 
trations and Elections, Agriculture. 

Nelms — Appropriations, Liquor Traffic, Public Lands, Banks and 
Banking (Ch.), Mississippi Levees, Mileage. 

NoRRELL — Liquor Traffic, Local and Private Legislation (Ch.), Insur- 
ance, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

O'Byrne — Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Agriculture, Insurance. 

O'Neill — Judiciary, Banks and Banking, Local and Private Legisla- 
tion, Insurance, Library. 

Patterson — Appropriations, County Affairs, Pensions, Claims, Public 
Land, Corporations. 

Perkins — Education, County Affairs, Public Printing, Propositions 
and Grievances (Ch.). 

Peyton — Appropriations, County Affairs, Mississippi Levees. 

Pollard — Judiciary, Fees and Salaries, Ways and Means, Mississippi 
Levees. 

QuiN — Judiciary (Ch.), Mtmicipalities, Propositions and Grievances, 
Rules, Insurance, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Rencher — Judiciary, Railroads, Public Printing, Contingent Ex- 
penses (Ch.). 

Robertson of Copiah — Public Printing (Ch.), Immigration and Labor, 
Fees and Salaries, Ways and Means. 

Robertson of Forrest — Judiciary, Railroads, Claims, Fisheries, Com- 
merce and Shipping, Corporations, Insurance, Constitution. 

Robinson of Montgomery- — Education, County Affairs, Contingent 
Expenses, Universities and Colleges. 

Rogers — Appropriations,. Banks and Banking, Public Health and 
Quarantine (Ch.), Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Russell — Judiciary, Municipalities, Agriculture, Universities and 
Colleges (Ch.). 

ScHMiTT — Roads, Ferries and .Bridges, Ways and Means, Mississippi 
Levees. 

Sharpe — Education, Military Affairs, W^ays and Means. 

Sheffield — Pensions, Manufactures (Ch.), Public Buildings and 
Grounds, Agriculture, Ways and Means, Mileage. 

Shelby — Judiciary, Liquor Traffic, Railroads, Municipalities, Missis- 
sippi Levees, Library. 

Shivers — Judiciary, Appropriations, Corporations, Ways and Means, 
Eleemosynary Institutions, 

Simpson — Appropriations, Mississippi Levees, Eleemosynarv' Insti- 
tutions. 

Slough — Judiciary, Registrations and Elections, Executive Contin- 
gent Funds, Fees and Salaries, Constitution, Universities and Colleges. 

Smith — Appropriations, Education, Militar>'' Affairs, Corporations, 
Banks and Banking, Fees and Salaries, Mississippi Levees. 



1034 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Stainton — Appropriations, Education, Registration and Elections 
(Ch.), Insurance. 

Stegall — Railroads, Registrations and Elections, Military Affairs, 
Claims, Agriculture, Fees and Salaries. 

Stennis — Propositions and Grievances, Corporations, Ways and Means 
(Ch.), Universities and Colleges. 

Stewart of Madison — Claims (Ch.), Ways and Means, Eleemosynary 
Institutions. 

Stewart of Wayne — Judiciary, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, Local 
and Private Legislation. 

Stinson — Appropriations, Education, County Affairs (Ch.), Pensions, 
Universities and Colleges. 

Stockett — Judiciary, Corporations, Ways and Means, Eleemosynary 
Institutions, 

Stone — Immigration ""and Labor, Public Health and Quarantine, 
Mississippi Levees, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Sullivant — Appropriations, Education, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, 
Mississippi Levees. 

Sumrall — Judiciary, Railroads, Registrations and Elections, Cor- 
porations, Mississippi Levees. 

Terry — Education, Claims, Public Lands. 

Tyson — Judiciary, Corporations (Ch.), Rules, Insurance, Ways and 
Means, Mississippi Levees. 

Valentine — Education, Penitentiary, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, 
Manufactures. 

Wellborn — ^Appropriations, Public Printing, Public Buildings and 
Ground.=^, Immigration and Labor, Universities and Colleges. 

White — Penitentiary, Ways and Means, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Williams — Judiciary, Census and Apportionments, Insurance, Elee- 
mosynary Institutions. 

Wood — 'Railroads, Public Printing, Pensions, Federal Relations, Con- 
tingent Expenses, Enrolled Bills. 

WooPALL — Public Printing, Roads, Perries and Bridges, Manufactures, 
Corporations, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Yates— -Judiciar>% County Affairs, Engrossed Bills (Ch.), Municipali- 
ties, Military Affairs, Fisheries, Commerce and Shipping, Executive 
Contingent Funds. Universities and Colleges. 

Yewell — Judiciary, Federal Relations (Ch.), Agriculture, Banks and 
Banking, Constitution, Eleemosynary Institutions. 

Zachry — Registrations and Elections, Roads, Ferries and Bridges, 
Manufactures. 

H. M. Street, Speaker and Chairman of Committee on Rules. 



SKETCHES OF MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 



WILLIAM ARK WRIGHT KILLINGS WORTH, of 
Cannonsburg, was bom September 30, 1848, at the village 
of Lorman, in Jefferson County, the son of William Ander- 
son Killingsworth and wife, Nancy Ann (Shaw) Killings- 
worth. His ancestors on both sides came from South Caro- 
lina. His maternal grandfather, Thompson B. Shaw, was 
a soldier in a South Carolina regiment in the War of 181 2, 
and was in the battle of New Orleans. After the war he 
went to Mississippi, there married Mary Shaw, and settled 
in Jefferson County; he died in 1854. Mr. Killingsworth's 
parents both died when he was quite young, and he was 
brought up by his grandmother, Mary Shaw, on her plan- 
tation near Fayette. His early education at the country 
schools was greatly interfered with by the distxirbed con- 
ditions of the war; when peace came he spent a year 1866-67, 
at Oakland College. He has always been a farmer and 
cotton planter. Mr. Killingsworth was in the State Legis- 
lature from 1896 to 1900 and was again elected November 
S, 1907. He is a Democrat; a ruling elder in the Southern 
Presbyterian Church, and a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. He has been twice married and is now a widower; 
was wedded to his first wife, Emma Farley, November 14, 
1871, and to his second, Sallie H. Hoggett, June 16, 1896. 
He has four children: Mrs. Etta (Killingsivorth) McKell of 
Starkville, C. P. Killingsworth of Cannonsburg, H. Vivian 
Killingsworth of Oakland, Cal., and Jessie Allan Killings- 
worth of Lorman. 




William A. Killingsworth. 



ISRAEL NEWTON MOSES, of Natchez, was bom Sep- 
tember 14, 1859, in that city, son of David Moses and wife, 
Babette (Gatzert) Moses. His father was a native of Alsace, 
then a French province; his mother was bom in Hesse 
Darmstadt, Gennany; the former came to Natchez in 1S49 
and started a mercantile business there which is still carried 
on by his sons. Mr. Moses was educated at Natchez Insti- 
tute and under the teaching of the Brothers; also at Lusher 
and Soule's Business College at New Orleans, graduating 
from the latter institution in 1876. He was a merchant from 
1877 till 1903. a banker till 1907, is now retired. He is a 
Democrat and a member of the Protective Order 01 Elks. 
He was elected to the House of Representatives November 

S. 1907. 




Israel Newton Moses. 



1036 




Samuel McElroy Nabors. 




WaiiamThomas Bennett. 



. ./V"®^^^-. 






- • 

Qaudiua L. Penn. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. ^ 

ALCORN COUNTY. 

SAMUEL Mcelroy nabors. of Connth. was born 
February 17, 1871, at Dumas, Tippah County, Miss., the son 
of WiUiam McPhearson Nabors and wife, Mary Matilda 
(McElroy) Nabors. Paternal ancestors were English immi- 
grants to America in colonial days. The first generation 
(tradition says there were seven brothers of them) fought 
under General Washington. Maternal ancestors were from 
Ireland; the grandparents on both sides came from South 
(Carolina to Mississippi. Mr. Nabors* father was a minister 
of the M. E. Church, South, and an officer in the Thirty- 
fourth Mississippi Regiment during the war. The subject 
of this sketch secured his early education in the rural schools 
of Tippah County, and his college training in an institution 
at Chalybeate Springs, Miss. He is a farmer and stock 
raiser by occupation; is a Democrat and strict prohibi- 
tionist; a member of the Southern Presbyterian Church 
for thirteen years and a member of the Farmers* Union. 
Was elected to the House of Representatives November s, 
1907. He was married December 16, 1894, in Tippah 
County to Sugenia Tate, daughter of Zack Juan Tate and 
wife, Missouri Simmons Tate, of Pontotoc; her family is of 
South Carolinian descent. Mr. and Mrs. Nabors have five 
children: Salome, Samuel Ottis Sugenia Gertrude, Beulah 
May and Willie Juan. 

WILLIAM THOMAS BENNETT, of Corinth, was born 
November 17, 1873, near Baldwyn, Prentiss County, Miss., 
the son of Jesse Alexander Bennett and wife, Cinthy Drucilla 
(Glover) Bennett. His paternal ancestors came to America 
from England some time before the Mexican War; the 
family was scattered during the Civil War and several of its 
members were killed in the conflict; Mr. Bennett's father 
was a soldier in the ranks of the Confederate Army, but 
retximed safely to his home and lived till 1900. The subject 
of this sketch obtained his early education in country 
schools, later studied at the high schools of Jacinto and 
Kossuth, and received private instruction in the higher 
branches tinder Professor J. O. Looney. He has taxight in 
the public schools of the State for twelve years, part of the 
time in Prentiss (}ovmty; he is now in intervals of teaching 
carrying on a cotirse of law study at the University of Mis- 
sissippi. Was elected to the Hotise of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Bennett is a Democrat, a deacon in 
the Baptist Church, a member of the Woodmen of the 
World and of the Knights of Pythias. He is unmarried. 



AMITE COUNTY. 

CLAUDIUS L. FENN, of Smithdale. was bom January 
ao, 1876. at his present home in Amite County, Miss., the 
son of Daniel W. Fennand wife, Mary Letha (Dickey) Fenn. 
Hia paternal ancestors were from Holland, settled in Georgia 
and took part in Revolutionary War; his paternal grand- 
mother was of English ancestry, his father served through 
the Civil War in the Fourth Mississippi Cavalry. His 



1 



1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1037 



maternal great-grandfather was an Irishman, who settled in 
South Carolina in the eighteenth century, fought during the 
Revolution for colonial liberty, and later was one of the 
earhest settlers in Mississippi Territor>'. Mr. Fenn attended 
the common schools of his county in boyhood, obtained his 
collegiate education at the M. and F. College at Liberty; 
read law in an office at McComb City, but did not practice. 
His occupation has always been that of a fanner. He was 
elected to the House of Representatives November s, 1907. 
He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church and of 
the Woodmen of the World and Odd Fellows. He was mar- 
ried near Smithdale, Miss., March 37, 1902, to Bessie A. 
Holmes, daughter of R. Coleman Holmes and wife, Lula 
Julia Everett Holmes, of McComb City. His wife comes of 
the well known Quin family of Pike County, Miss. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fenn have three children: Eugene, Hilton and Julia 
Audelle. 



EUGENE GERALD, of Smithdale, was bom July 30. 
x88a. at that place, the son of James E. Gerald and wife, 
L. Addie (Wilson) Gerald. His paternal ancestors came 
from England and Ireland to North CaroUna, emigrating to 
Mississippi in 18 10; his maternal line of Irish descent, 
settled in Georgia. His great grandfather, William Gerald, 
was a soldier in the War of 181 2, was with Jackson at the 
battle of New Orleans, and while in camp there contracted 
a fever from which he died. The father of the subject of 
this sketch was too young at the time of the Civil War to 
take part in it, but his four elder brothers all entered the 
army, one falling at Gettysburg and another at Sharpsburg. 
Mr. Gerald attended the public schools at Mars Hill; after 
completing his course there he spent one year at Mississippi 
College, Chnton. At the age of eighteen he began teaching; 
taught four years in schools of Amite County, then entered 
upon the business of merchandising, in which he is still 
engaged. While he was teaching in his home school at Mars 
Hill he founded, through subscription, a library of some 400 
volumes for the use of the school. Mr. Gerald is a Demo- 
crat, a Mason and an Odd Fellow. He is unmarried. He 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. 



ATTALA COUNTY. 

DAVID COLLINS BAILEY, of Ayres, was bom Novem- 
ber 30, 1S61, at Center, Attala County. He was educated 
in the pubhc schools of his county under Prof. J. H. SuUi- 
vant and other teachers. His occupations have been those 
of farmer and country merchant. He is a Baptist and a 
member of the Woodmen of the World. Was elected to the 
Hovise of Representatives November 5, 1907. He married 
Alice Therma Seawright, daughter of -James ColwcU Sea- 
wright and wife. Nancy Franklin Seawright, living near 
Kosciusko. Mr. and Mrs, Bailey have eight children: 
Edith Lavelle, James DeWitt, Charles Hugh, Nannie Mo- 
selle, Thelmer Kentling, Therma Estelle, Dana Camelle and 
David Tumage. 




Eugene Gerald. 




David Collins Bailey. 



1038 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




John James Britt. 



JOHN JAMES BRITT, of Balatusha, was bom June 26, 
1878, at Newport, Attala County, Miss., the son of Thomas 
Britt and his wife, Ozela Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Britt. 
His father was born at Cork. Ireland, coming to America at 
the age of twenty-one years; his mother's family were 
native MLssissippians. Mr. Britt obtained his education in 
the common schools of his vicinity. His occupation is that 
of a farmer. He was elected to the House of Representa- 
tives November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat and a member 
of the order of the Woodmen of the World. He was married 
December 24, 1902, to Virgie Beatrice, daughter of William 
Columbus McDaniel and wife, Mary Elizabeth McDaniel, of 
Shreveport, La. Mr. and Mrs. Britt have two children: 
Earl Homer and Grace Dexter. 




Robert Masters Frazier. 



BENTON COUNTY. 

^^ROBERT MASTERS FRAZIER, of Hickory Flat, was 
bom December 25, 1856, in Tippah County (now Union), 
Miss., the son of John Daniel Frazier and wife, Elmira 
Aveline (Shelton) Frazier. His paternal ancestors came 
from North Carolina, maternal from Tennessee. Mr. Fra- 
zier attended the country schools of his vicinity until he 
was about twenty-three years old, then studied at an acad- 
emy at Ellistown, taught by Rev. A. J. French; later he 
attended the Poplar Springs Normal College for a time, but 
did not graduate. He began teaching in January, 1885, has 
taught more of less every year since; his sole occupations 
have been teaching and farming, aside from a limited time 
spent in public duties. He was a member of the State 
Legislature in 1890 and again in 1900 and 1902, and was 
again elected November 5, 1907; is now a member of the 
Village Board of Hickory Flat; is a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church. Mr. Frazier was married June 
26, 1894, to Mary Velora Ross, daughter of William Carroll 
and Margaret Cassandra Ross, of Hickory Flat. His wife's 
family on both sides have been native Mississippians for 
three generations. Mr. and Mrs. Frazier have six children: 
Hoke, Ross, Mabel, Lee, Guy and Joe. 




Clarence Richard Smith. 



BOLIVAR COUNTY. 

CLARENCE RICHARD SMITH, of Cleveland, was bom 
March 9, 1866, at DeSotovilie, Choctaw County, Ala., the 
son of Lewis R. Smith and wife, Susan (Williams) Smith. 
His father's family were from South Carolina, his mother's 
were Alabamians; his father served as a Confederate soldier 
throughout the Civil War. Mr. Smith obtained his educa- 
tion in the Alabama public schools and did not receive a 
college or professional education. He began his business 
career at Cleveland, Miss., in 1886 as clerk in a general 
store; about 1892 he established a general fire ins-oranoe 
agency in that town, invested in lands and city property, 
and now for some years has been actively engaged in plant- 
ing, merchandising and other enterprises. He has served 
two terras as Mayor of Cleveland; is at present a member 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1039 



of the Congressional Executive Committee from his district. 
Was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
i9or; is a Democrat, a member of the M. E. Church, South, 
of the Knij,'hts of Pythias and the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He was married November 22, 1893, 
at Coldwater, Miss., to Mamie Williams, daughter of Henry 
"Williams and wife, Lelia Williams, of that place. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith have one child, Corinne. 



GEORGE BARNES SHELBY, JR.. of Shelby, was 
bom October 12, 1881, at Refuge. Washington County, 
Miss., the son of George Barnes Shelby and v/ife, Jane 
(Poitervent) Shelby. The subject of this sketch is the great- 
great-grandson of General Evan Shelby, and great-grandson 
of Captain Moses Shelby, a brother of Isaac Shelby, the first 
Governor of Kentucky; his father, G. B. Shelby, was a 
Confederate soldier and w^as one of the picked men from 
Wirt Adams' regiment detailed for special service, and 
known as "Harvey's Scouts;" in 1900-02 he was a member 
of the State Legislature. Mr. Shelby obtained his early 
education at St. Thomas Hall, Holly Springs, Miss.; in the 
summer of 1900 he entered the University of the South, 
Sewanee, Tenn.; in 1903 he became a student in the Law- 
School of the University of Mississippi, graduating in June, 
1905. He has since practiced in Cleveland and in Shelby 
He was Chairman of the Election Commission in his county, 
1906; is a member of the M. E. Church, South, and holds 
ofiBcial position in the Knights of Pythias. He is not mar- 
ried. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November s, 1907. 




George B. Shelby, Jr. 



CALHOUN COUNTY. 



WILLIAM JOSIAH PATTERSON, of Pittsboro. was 
bom December 8. 1847. in Cherokee County, Georgia, the son 
of John Jackson Patterson and wife. Permelia (Hobgood) 
Patterson. His paternal ancestors were of English descent. 
settling in Virginia before the Revolutionary- War; his 
mother's family were native Georgians. Mr. Patterson had 
no educational opportunities outside of the country schools of 
Calhoun County, Miss., to which county his fat-her brought 
his family in the early fifties; he has been a farmer all his 
life. He has held several county offices; was Justice of the 
Peace 1874 to 1880; member of the Board of Superv-isors 
1880 to 1885; County Treasurer 1S90 to 1896; was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5. 1907. He 
is a Democrat; for a number of years has been Chairman of 
the Democratic E.xecutive Committee of his county, resign- 
ing this position to become a candidate for the office of Rep- 
resentative; has been a Mason for more than twenty years; 
has held important otfit-ial positions in and is now Treasurer 
of his Lodge. He was married Febn.iary 14, iS<)7. in Cal- 
houn County to Mary Jane Mwrphree, daughter of James 
Pleasant Murphree and Sarah Ann Henderson Murphree. 
His wife's family is of Irish descent. Mr. and Mrs. Patter- 




William Josiah Patterson. 



1040 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



son have eight living children: Mrs. Martha Elizabeth (Pat- 
terson) Ruth, of Calhoun City; Dr. C. \V. Patterson and 
Mrs. A. L. Patterson, both of Pittsboro; F. R. Patterson, of 
Anguilla; A. T. Patterson, of Eupora, and Etta, I. F. and 
N. E. Patterson, at home. 




John Byrd Going. 



JOHN BYRD GOING, of Pittsboro, was bom January 
26, 1873, at that place, the son of David Going and wife, 
Martha Caroline (Pilgreen) Going. His ancestors on both 
sides lived in Alabama; his father served in the ranks of 
the Confederate Army in Company F. Fourth Mississippi 
Infantry. Mr. Going obtained his education in the country 
schools of Calhoun County, and through diligent reading 
and study at home; he had no opportunity for a college 
education. He worked on a farm in youth, but wearying 
of that he learned the printer's art in his native town, and 
worked at the case until, with the launching of the Dixie, 
Herald of Pittsboro, December 17, 1903, he entered journal- 
ism proper as editor of that paper. This position he still 
holds. Was elected to the House of Representatives No- 
vember 5, 1907. He is a Democrat and has served as Sec- 
retary of the County Executive Committee; is a member 
of the Baptist Church, the Knights of Pythias and the Wood- 
men of the World. Mr. Going married Ron da Steele, 
daughter of Isaac Calaway Steele and Jane Steele, of Ellard. 
They have one child, Marion Finley Calaway. 




Samuel Spillman Monday. 



CARROLL COUNTY. 

SMIUEL SPILLMAN MONDAY, of Carrollton, was 
bom April 2, 1856. at Bellview (now Holcomb). Tallahatchie 
(now Grenada) County, Miss., the son of John Fletcher 
Monday and wife, Mar>- Ann (Smith) Monday. His pater- 
nal ancestors were Irish immigrants that settled in East 
Tennessee in an early day; maternal were from Virginia 
and Tennessee. Mr. Monday obtained his education at 
country schools in youth; on arriving at man's estate he 
studied law in an office in Carrollton. In April, 1890, he 
obtained license from the court to practice, and in 1891 
opened an office in Carrollton; practiced in Vaiden in 1892 
and 1893. since then he has carried on milling and farming 
in connection with the practice of law. He was elected 
Mayor of Carrollton in January. 1889; was chosen Justice 
of the Peace in 1902; served on the Executive Committee 
of his party in 1896-1900 and from 1904 to 1907. Mr. 
Monday is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church for 
twenty-six years and Church Clerk for twelve years. Was 
elected to the House of Representatives November s, 1907. 
He was married at Tinsley. Miss.. March 5. 1902. to Mary- 
Palestine (Rozier) Atkinson, daughter of Earl Lalestard 
Rozier and wife, Nancy Ann (Persons) Rozier, of Smith 
Mill. His wife's ancestors came from South Carolina and 
Alabama. Mr. Monday had been previously married to 
Mrs. Mary Frances (Metcalfe) Halcell, and by that marriage 
had one child, Mary Frances. 



^% 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1041 



TANDY O. YE WELL, of CarroUton. was born Decem- 
ber 31, 1871, at Ashley Creek, Carroll County, Miss., son of 
Norman Marion Yewell and wife, Nancy Jane (Dunn) Yewell. 
His paternal ancestors were from Ireland, and settled in 
Virginia; maternal were also of Irish extraction. Mr. 
Yewell's grandparents came to Mississippi about 1830; his 
father served fotir years in the ranks of the Confederate 
Army, in Company K, Thirtieth Mississippi Regiment. 
Mr. Yewell attended the common schools of his county 
during the intervals of farm labor, and was a student for a 
time in the high school at CarroUton, but counts home-read- 
ing before the old pine-knot fires as a most important 
element in his education. He attended the Law School of 
the University of Mississippi, taking his Bachelor's degree 
in 1 90s, with special distinction as leader of his class. Pre- 
vious to entering the University he taught in rural schools 
for two years; on his graduation was admitted to the bar, 
and began practice at CarroUton; was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Yewell was 
Superintendent of Education of Carroll County from 1896 
to 1900; has served on the Democratic County Executive 
Committee for nearly twelve years. He is a Democrat and 
an Odd Fellow; is not married. 




Tandy O. Yewell. 



CHICKASAW COUNTY. 
FRANK BURKITT, of Okolona, was bom July s. 1843. 
near Lawrenceburg, Tenn., the son of Henry Lemuel Burkitt 
and his wife. Louise (Howell) Burkitt. His paternal an- 
cestors came from England to North Carolina before the 
Revolution; his great-grandfather, Lemuel Burkitt, was an 
eminent Baptist minister and author; his father emigrated 
from North Carolina to Tennessee, was forced to fiee from 
the latter State to Alabama during the Civil War; came to 
Mississippi in 1865; was elected State Senator in 18S4. 
Mr. Burkitt attended Tennessee schools under various 
teachers; in 1857 entered the school of Professor Watldns, 
News Ferry, Va.. and was there one year; June a8, 1861, 
enlisted in Confederate Army. He was Sergeant-Major, 
Ninth Battalion Tennessee Cavalry, and reached rank of 
Captain before the parole of May 15, 1865. After the war 
he taught school in Alabama and Mississippi; reading law 
privately; in 1872 he passed examination and practiced for 
a time, then became editor of the Chickasaw Messenger; in 
1876 moved paper to Okolona, where he edited it under name 
of Peoples' Messenger. Mr. Burkitt has held county and 
local offices; was elected to Legislature in 1886 and re-elected 
three times; was a member of Constitutional Convention of 
1890; acted with Peoples' Party from 1892 till the organiza- 
tion disbanded in 1900; was the candidate of that party for 
Governor in 1895. He is now a Democrat; a Mason; Grand 
Master of Masons in 1879. Grand Commander 1904. and a 
Knight Templar; in 1886 he published a book entitled "Our 
State Finances and School System"; was elected to the 
House of Representatives Nov. 5, 1907. Mr. Burkitt has 
been tv;ce married: Deoem'oer 30, 1S66, to Mattie Schrimsher; 
December 30. 1906, to Mary Elizabeth Mitchell. By his 
first marriage he had four children: Mrs. Jennie Lee (Bur- 
kitt) Cary, of Holly Springs; James Howell, of Calhoun 
City;] Mary Louise (Burkitt) King, of Okolona. and Bennie 
(Burkitt) Dossett. of Sacramanto, Ky. 




Frank Burkitt. 



1042 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




James Asbur>' Lewis. 



JAMES ASBURY LEWIS, of Houston, was born May 
17, 1836, at Centerville, Bibb County, Ala., the son of 
Rev. Wiley Lewis and his wife, Martha (Summers) Lewis. 
His paternal ancestors came from Wales, some of them beinjj 
with the early settlers of Jamestown, Va. ; both of his grand- 
fathers served in the War of 181 2, and both fought under 
Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans. The father of the 
subject of this sketch was bom in Tennessee, coming to 
Mississippi in 1843; ^^ was a preacher of the M. E. Church, 
South, for fifty-five years. Mr. Lewis' educational oppor- 
tunities were limited to old-fashioned country schools. He 
enlisted in the Confederate Army February 12, i86i, as 
private, Company H, Thirty-first Mississippi Regiment; 
served till his command surrendered at Greensboro, N. C, 
April 26, 1865. Mr. Lewis is a farmer by occupation, but is 
much interested in public affairs; was member of County 
Board of Supervisors six years, of Board of Education six 
years, and is now President of the Pension Board. He is a 
Democrat, a member of the M. E. Church. South, and Sunday- 
school Superintendent for forty years; and Worshipful 
Master of Masonic Lodge fifteen years; he has always been 
active in the cause of temperance and education; was Presi- 
dent of a Law and Order League that suppressed disorder 
in his district in 1889; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Lewis was married Janu- 
ary 13, 1859, at Congress, Miss., to Elizabeth Foster, daugh- 
ter of Moses D. Foster and wife, Nancy (T'cUiell) Foster. 
They have six living children : Rev. T. W. Lewis, of Jackson ; 
Mrs. Nannie (Lewis) Whitson, also of Jackson; Hon. W. N. 
Lewis, of Da\-is, L T.; Rev. E. S. Lewis, of West Point; 
J. S. Lewis, of Mantee, and Mrs. Dixie (Lewis) Haley, of 
Chattanooga. Tenn. 




Carlton A. Lindsey. 



CHOCTAW" COUNTY. 

CARLTON ALEXANDER LINDSEY. of Eupora. was 
bom February 4, 1853, near Hunts\'ille, Choctaw County. 
Miss., the son of Carlton Lindsey and wife, Martha Susan 
(Caperton) Lindsey. His paternal ancestors were from 
Kentucky; maternal from Georgia; his father entered the 
Confederate Army as a private, was chosen Lieutenant, and 
served under Forrest throughout the war. Mr. Lindsey 
attended the common schools in youth, but had no oppor- 
tunity for advanced education. He has been a farmer all 
his life. He is now a Democrat; was a member of the 
Peoples' Party from 1894 until 1900; was Chairman of the 
Executive Committee of the Peoples' Party of his county. 
He is a Baptist and an official member of the Relief Alliance 
and Union; he was elected to the Plouse of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Lindsey was married March 15. 
1883. to Mattie Emelia Love, dauirhter of Samuel Love and 
wife, Mary Love, of Huntsville: his wife's family came from 
South Carolina. Of the ten children bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lindsey, five are now living, as follows: Samuel, Mamie. 
Kyle, Mozell and Eva. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1043 



CLAIBORNE COUNTY. 

ROBERT BUCKNER ANDERSON, of Port Gibson, 
was bom January 24, i876,atStoneville, Washington County, 
Miss., the son of Lomax Anderson and wife, Nellie (Buckner) 
Anderson. His paternal grandfather was a Mobile lawyer; 
his grandfather on his mother's side was Chancellor of Mis- 
sissippi, 1839-1846; his father sen--ed in the Confederate 
Army, a soldier in Forrest's Cavalry. Mr. Anderson obtained 
his education in the public schools and the C. H. Academy 
at Port Gibson; he was a student in the Literary Department 
of the University of Mississippi three years; entered the Law 
School there, and took his degree in 1897. The same year 
he entered upon the practice of his profession; is now County 
Attorney for Claiborne; was Mayor of Port Gibson six years. 
He is a Democrat; has been a member of the County Execu- 
tive Committee; is a Presb>'terian, a Mason and a Knight of 
Pythias; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5. 1907. He was married January 36, 1899. at 
Port Gibson, to Maria Morehead, daughter of B. H. More- 
head and wife. Mary T. Morehead. 



CLARKE COUNTY. 

ARISTA JOHNSTON, of Shubuta, was bom November 
4, 1849, at Goodwater, Clarke County, Miss., the son of 
James Burr Johnston and his wife, Isabella 'A. Johnston. 
His parents were of the same suniam-e, being cousins, but 
his remote paternal ancestors were from Scotland, and his 
maternal from Sweden. The grandfather of Mr. Johnston, 
known as Colonel Jack Johnston, was Indian Agent for the 
Government and drew up the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit 
Creek, between the United States and the Choctaws. which 
provided for the removal of the tribe beyond the Mississippi. 
The subject of this sketch attended the common schools of 
his vicinity, but owing to the disorganized conditions caused 
by the war, his opportunities were but limited. From youth 
his occupation has been that of a farmer, in which line he has 
succeeded well. He was elected to the Legislature in 1S99, 
serving in the sessions of 1900 and 190a; in December, 1906, 
he was elected Mayor of Shubuta; was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, 
and a Steward in the M. E. Church, South. Mr. Johnston 
has been twice married; his first wife was Amelia Heidelberg, 
daughter of Samuel Heidelberg and wife, Elizabeth (Gran- 
bery) Heidelberg, of JasjJtr County; his second was Mary A. 
McCoy, daughter of J. ^I. McCoy and wife, Mary (Moseley) 
McCoy, of Augusta. By his first marriage he had three 
children: Everett Laviga Johnston, of Mobile, Ala.; Ernest 
Arista Johnston, of Meridian. Miss.; and Mrs. Edna Earl 
(Johnston) Leggctt, of Shubuta. By his second marriage 
he has seven children : Percy Walker. James Burr, Samuel G., 
Mrs. Ruby (Johnston) Smith, of Shubuta; Clarabelle, Maggie 
and Lois. 




1044 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Josiah Perry Valentine. 



CLAY COUNTY. 

JOSIAH PERRY VALENTINE. o£ Pheba. was bom 
April 30, x866, near Starkville, Oktibbeha County, Miss., the 
son of Paul Valentine and wife, Martha Ann (Perry) Valen- 
tine. His ancestors on both sides were North Carolinians. 
Mr. Valentine attended the common schools of Henryville, 
Miss., and later completed the Freshman year at the Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College, Starkville. His occupation 
has been farming and merchandising. He has been Mayor 
of the town of Pheba, Supervisor of his district for four years, 
and has served on the Clay County Democratic Executive 
Committee. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Valentine is a Democrat and a 
member of the Order of Woodmen of the World. He was 
married at Pheba September 4, 1895. to Annie Pearl Fluka, 
daughter of George CuUen Fluka and wife, Laura (Barfield) 
Fluka, of Alabama. Mr. and Mrs. Valentine have six chil- 
dren: Pearl Gertinide, Mattie Lauretta, Mary Pauline, Lillian 
Irene, Georgia Perry and Joe Perry. 



t 




John Calhoun Bridges. 



JOHN CALHOUN BRIDGES, of Pheba. was bom in 
1869 in Choctaw County, Miss., the son of Albert Lee Bridges 
and wife, Julia Ann (Quin) Bridges. Paternal ancestors 
were from Ireland; maternal from Scotland; his father was 
a native of Georgia. Mr. Bridges obtained his early educa- 
tion in country schools of Oktibbeha County; entered the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College at Starkville, Miss., 
where he graduated in 189 1. He taiight school one year, 
then clerked a year; began farming and saw-milling in 1894. 
and since then has been also connected with merchandising 
and ginning. He was elected to the House of Representa- 
tives November s, 1907. Mr. Bridges is a Democrat, a 
Baptist, a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the 
Improved Order of Red Men. He v/as married January 13, 
1903, at Cliftonville, to Stella Rife, daughter of William Rife 
and Cora (Craven) Rife. His wife's grandparents came from 
England. Mr. Bridges had been previously married, May 25. 
1898, to Susie Lee Joiner, and has two children by his first 
marriage: Sallie Will and Susie. 



COAHOMA COUNTY. 



■■4/ 



xA. 



O^v 



William A. Alcorn, Jr. 



WILLIAM ARISTIDES ALCORN, JR., of Clarksdale. 
was bom October ao, 1868. at Friar's Point, Miss., and is the 
son of George Randolph Alcorn and wife, Mary (Cooper) 
Alcorn. His ancestors came to America from Ireland and 
settled in Pennsylvania, thence to Kentucky, and later in 
Mississippi. The father of the subject of this sketch was a 
soldier of the Confederacy, being a Lieutenant of Captain 
Porter's Company of Chalmers' Battalion; was Chancery 
Clerk of Coahoma County, 1866 to 1876, and Sheriff of the 
county; cousin of Gov. J. L. Alcorn; died of yellow fever in 
1878. Mr. Alcorn attended the private school of Miss Emma 
Lewis, of Ripley, Tenn., at Friar's Point, and the primar.' 
schools of Friar's Point; entered St. Mar>''s College. Marion 
County, Ky., and pursued studies untU 18S8; attended 
Louisville Law School in 1888; admitted to the bar in 189a; 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 



1045 



located at Clarksdale; Chancery Court Clerk of Coahoma 
County, 1890-1893; elected to the House of Representatives 
in 1899; re-elected November 3, 1903, and November 5. 
1907. Mr. Alcom is a Democrat, has served as County 
Committeeman; member of Episcopal Church; Knight of 
Pythias and Elk; was married May 20, 189 1, at Memphis, 
Tenn., to Florence Pearl Yates, daughter of Meredith Yates 
and wife, Elizabeth Cannon. Mrs. Alcom is a descendant 
of Col. William Yates, of the Army of the Revolution, and 
of George Walton, one of the signers of the Declaration ; in 
the maternal Hne she is related to the Lees of Virginia. 
In the House of 1904-1908 Mr. Alcom was a member of the 
following committees: Judiciary, Levees, Federal Relations, 
Military Affairs (Ch.), Claims and Redistricting the State. 
He was re-elected to the House from Coahoma County 
November 5, 1907. In 1903 was Chairman of Committee 
en Local and Private Legislation. Is member of Democratic 
Executive Committee of Third Congressional District. 



OSCAR GOODBAR JOHNSTON, of Friar's Point, was 
bom January 37, 1880, at Jackson, Miss., the son of John 
Calvin Johnston and wife, Emma Elizabeth (Goodbar) 
Johnston. His immediate ancestors on the father's side 
were Mississippians ; on the mother's side were from Ten- 
nessee; his father held the office of Deputy State Auditor 
for a number of years. Mr. Johnston, in boyhood, attended 
public and private schools in Jackson, Miss.," also schools at 
Kansas City, Mo., and Memphis, Tenn.; then was sent to a 
private, school at Friar's Point, Miss.; his literary education 
was obtained at Kentucky Military Institute, where he was 
graduated in June, 1899, with first honors, and was Saluta- 
torian of his class. He studied law for one term, at the 
University of Mississippi, but went to Cumberland Univer- 
sity, Lebanon, Tenn., to complete his law course, graduating 
with his Bachelor's degree June 6, 1901; he was also class 
orator. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November s, 1907. Mr. Johnston is a Democrat, a Methodist, 
a Mason, being Senior Warden of his lodge, also is an Odd 
Fellow and a member of the D. K. E. Fraternity. He was 
married February 21, 1905, at Pine Bluff, Ark., to Martha 
Mottley Anderson, daughter of Samuel Mottley Anderson 
and wife, Jessie Finley Anderson. 




Oscar Goodbar Johnston. 



COPIAH COUNTY. 



WALTER WILLIAM ROBERTSON, of Wesson, was 
bom December 10, 1870, and is the son of William Simpson 
Roberston and his wife, Cornelia Rebecca (Geiger) Robertson. 
His father was a native Mississippian. The subject of this 
sketch obtained his education in the Westville public schools 
and when a mere lad began to learn to set type; he worked 
a year without wages under Judge T. R. Gowan, editor of 
the old Westville Xeu's, to secure instruction in the printer's 
art. He never entered college but has spent his life in 
newspaper work, as printer and editor. In May. 1S99. he 
became editor of the Wesson Enterpriae and still holds that 
position. He has.bui!t up a fine newspaper business entirely 
by his own e.xertions. vvithov'.t financial help from any one. 
Mr. Robertson is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist 




Walter William Robertson 



1046 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Church since his fourteenth year; a Mason, an Odd Fellow, 
and a Woodman of the World; was elected to the House of 
Representatives November 5, 1907. He was married Decem- 
ber 23, 1891, to Cora Isabelle Blades, daughter of Benjamin 
Blades and wife, Alice (Travis) Blades, of Wesson. Mr. and 
Mrs. Robertson have six living children: Myrtie May, Eva 
Cora Belle, Lillie, Walter W., Jr.. and Frank. 




CLARENCE EUGENE HOOD, of DentviUe, was born 
May I, 1882, at that place, the son of Matthew Hood and 
wife, Margaret (Massey) Hood. His paternal ancestors were 
from Scotland; maternal from Ireland. Matthew Hood was 
a Confederate soldier, enlisted early in 1861, in Company D 
Twelfth Mississippi Regiment, was slightly wounded at Seven 
Pines, Manassas and Sharpsburg; at Petersburg was wounded 
in both legs, from which injury he has always been crippled. 
Mr. Hoo4 attended the public and high schools of Copiah 
County; attended Mississippi College at Clinton, but did not 
complete the course. After leaving school in 1904 he was 
elected Principal of the DentviUe school; two years later, 
when this was transformed into a high school, he was unani- 
mously chosen as its Principal. He was elected to the House 
of Representatives November s, 1907. Mr. Hood is a 
Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, also a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and Senior Warden of his lodge. 
He is unmarried. ~ 



W. B. MILLER, of Hazlehurst. 




William Leroy Cranford. 



COVINGTON COUNTY. 

WILLIAM LEROY CRANFORD, of Seminary, was 
bom February 26, 1875, near Tuscanola. Jones County, the 
son of Tandy Walker Cranford and Rachel Ann (Speed) 
Cranford. Paternal ancestors came from Holland to South 
Carolina, thence to Alabama and Mississippi; maternal com- 
ing from England, were also South Carolina settlers. The 
father of Mr. Cranford was a soldier in the Confederate 
Army. The subject of this sketch obtained his early educa- 
tion in the haphazard way usually allotted to farmer's boys, 
attending the rural school when the labor of the farm would 
permit. But by the age of nineteen he had gained a smat- 
tering knowledge of sufficient scope to enable him to get a 
certificate as teacher of rural schools, which occupation he 
followed for several years. He then entered Millsaps Col- 
lege, and studied law, receiving his Bachelor's degree in 1900, 
since which time he has been engaged in practice. He has 
filled several town offices, and was appointed Commissioner 
of Election for Covington County in 1904. and re-appointed 
in 1906, but resigned, becoming a candidate for Representa- 
tive; was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
ber s, 1907. Mr. Cranford is a Democrat, a Master Mason. 
A. F. and A. M., a Royal Arch Mason, Odd Fellow and a 
member of the Improved Order of Red Men. He was mar- 
ried, at Hebron, Miss., to Eliza Melissa Ford, da-ighter of 
Sanford Valentine Ford and wife, Drucilla Graves Ford. 
His wife's family are Missi.ssippians. Mr. and Mrs. Cran- 
ford have three children : Alden Ford. Wilhelmina Hope and 
Christiana Grace. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1047 



DESOTO COUNTY. 

JOHN HARRIS SIMPSON, of Byhalia. was born 
December 2, 1847, near Clinton, Laurens County, South 
Carolina, the son of Decatur DeKalb Simpson and wife 
Elizabeth Ann (Harris) Simpson. His paternal ancestors 
were of Scotch-Irish Presbyterian stock; his grandfather 
served through the War of 181 2. Mr. Simpson attended 
Hillville and Clinton Academies in his native county; when 
"not yet sixteen years of age he enlisted as a private in the 
Confederate Army; served through the struggle and was an 
Orderly Sergeant before its close. He worked as a carpenter 
from 1868 to 187 1, then began farming in Panola County, 
remaining there nine years; removed to DeSoto County, and 
has worked the farm where he now is over twenty-five years; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5. 
1907. Mr. Simpson is a Democrat and an elder in the Pres- 
byterian Church.- He has belonged to the Patrons of Hus- 
bandr>", the Farmers' Alliance and the Farmers' Union. 
Was a Populist, serving on all committees of that party; 
was a delegate to the National Convention at St. Louis in 
1900, and candidate for Congress in 1895. He was married 
January 18, 1871, near Batesville, to his cousin. Margaret 
Penelope, daughter of James Francis Simpson and wife, 
Jane Allen Simpson. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have three liv- 
ing children: Mrs. Mary Edith f Simpson) Thompson, of Wat- 
son: John Laurens and Gordon Harris, both living at home. 




John Harris Simpson. 




[Ethelbert Joyce Pollard. 



ETHELBERT JOYCE POLLARD, of Hernando, was 
bom Jvme 19, 1875, at White Haven, Tenn., and is the son of 
Reuben Turner Pollard and his wife, x\nnie Adolphus 
(Dooley) Pollard. His paternal ancestors came from Wales 
and settled in Alabama; maternal emigrated from Scotland 
to America in colonial days. His father was a Confederate 
soldier, ser-ving through the entire period of the Civil War. 
Mr. Pollard attended the public schools of Shelby County, 
Tennessee, and the West Point Male Academy at West 
Point, Miss., under the instruction of W. H. Buntin and J. R. 
Tipton. He was a student at the University of Mississippi 
from 1900 to 1904; while there was President of the Her- 
macan Literary Society. Leaving college he taught school 
in DeSoto County, and meanwhile read law assiduously, 
and was admitted to the bar in the fall of 1906. He entered - 
immediately upon the practice of his profession in Hernando. 
Was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. Mr. Pollard is a Democrat, a Cumberland Presby- 
terian and a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. 
He is not married. 



FORREST COUNTY. 

STOKES VERNON ROBERTSON, of Hattiesburg. was 
bom July a6, 1881, at Williamsburg, Covington County. 
Miss., the son of George Carson Robertson and wife, Martha 
Adaline (Holcomb) Robertson. His paternal ancestors were 
of Scotch descent and came to Mississippi from Geor>,^ia. 
Mr. Robertson attended the public schools of Hattiesburg 
in boyhood; became a student of the University of Missis- 
sippi, where he was graduated with degree of B. S. in 190S. ^Stokes Vernon Robertson 




1048 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




having won many honors in his course. He took Freshman 
and Sophomore Medals and represented the University in 
the Inter-Collegiate Oratorical Association in 1904 and won 
the second prize; also won the Senior Debater's medal in 
the Hermaean Literary Society in 1905, and received a medal 
at the Crystal Springs Chautauqua the same year; entered 
upon the active practice of law April i, 1907. Was elected 
to the House of Repesentatives November 5, 1907. He is a 
Democrat, a Presbyterian and a member of the Kappa Alpha 
College fraternity. Mr. Robertson was married at Oxford, 
Miss., November 20, 1907, to Sudie Burt, daughter of Mrs. 
M. E. Burt and granddaughter of the Rev. Dr. Stainback, 
a prominent clergyman of the Ctimberland Presbyterian 
Church. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

MOZE HUNT JONES, of Little Springs, was bom Feb- 
ruary 21, 1883, at that place, the son of William Franklin 
Jones and wife, Iveanore (Hunt) Jones. . Paternal ancestors 
came from England and settled in Georgia. Mr. Jones 
attended the public schools of Little Springs under various 
teachers; entered Mississippi College at Clinton, graduating 
in 1902, with B. S. degree; studied law at the University of 
Mississippi at Oxford, taking his degree in 1903, and begin- 
ning practice in his home town the same year. He is still 
occupied with law and the care of a plantation. Was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Jones is a Democrat, a Baptist and a member of the Masonic 
Order. He was married December 22, 1903, at Poteau, 
Indian Territory, to Marie En\ma Webb, daughter of S. W. 
Webb and wife, Mattie Webb, of that place. 






GREENE COUNTY. 




Eugene \\ 



EUGENE WALTER BRELAND, of LeakesviUe, was 
bom September 10, 1870, at that place, son of Gabriel Bre- 
land and wife, Elizabeth Jane (Clark) Breland. His imme- 
diate ancestors on both sides were native Mississippians; his 
father was County Treasurer of Greene County for twenty 
years, and also County Superintendent of Education for 
several years prior to his death. Mr. Breland attended the 
public schools of Greene County, then studied at the Cooper- 
Huddleston College of Daleville, Miss., for two years, but 
did not graduate. He taught in the public schools and high 
schools of Greene, Perry and Jackson Counties for twelve 
years; was County Superintendent of Education of Greene 
County from 1896 to 1900, and served as Sheriff and Tax 
Collector from 1904 to 1908. Was elected to the House oj 
Representatives November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat; 
was Chairman of County Executive Committee 1904 to 1906; 
is a Methodist, a Mason, Odd Fellow and Knight of P>^hias. 
Mr. Breland was married at LeakesviUe November 10, 1895. 
to Lvila Lee Lowrey, daughter of John W. Lowrey and wife, 
Mollie E. Lowrey, o£ Blue Mountain. He and his wife have 
SIX .children : Ora Lee, Eugene Lowrey, Alia Rookh, Euclid 
Walter, Horace Leon and Lula Mae. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1049 



GRENADA COUNTY. 

ANDREW SECREST MORRISON, of Grenada, was 
bom January 29, 1869. at Springport. Panola County, Miss., 
the son of Hugh McEwen Morrison and wife, Fannie (Mc- 
Lure) Morrison. Paternal ancestors came from Scotland in 
1745, driven to the New World by persecution, they settled 
in Cabarras County, N. C; maternal progenitors came from 
Ireland much later, settling in Columbia, S. C. His father 
was Chaplain of the Nineteenth Mississippi Infantry during 
the last two years of the war. Mr. Morrison attended the 
common schools of Marshall and Benton Counties, and 
secured his higher education at the University of Mississippi, 
the Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville.Tenn., 
and the luka Normal School, securing the degrees of B. A. 
and B. S.: attended the Law School of the University of 
Mississippi, taking two years* course in one and receiving 
his Bachelor's degree in 1898; opened la-^ office at Grenada 
the same year and has been busily engaged in the practice 
ever since. While carrying on his college studies he taught 
school that he might pay his own expenses ; this was a jjeriod 
of nearly ten years. He was Superientendent of the Grenada 
city schools for seven years; was in the State Legislature of 
1904; and was re-elected November 5, 1907. Is a Demo- 
crat, a Presbyterian. Mason and Knight of Pythias. He was 
married November 5, 1891. to Fannie Baker, of Duck^Hill. 
Montgomery County. 




Andrew Secrest Morrison. 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 

EMILE JOSEPH GEX, of Bay St. Louis, was bom May 
14, 1883, at New Orleans, La., and is the son of Lucien 
Myrtle Gex and his wife, Marie Victoria (Demoruelle) Gex. 
His father was a member of the Louisiana Legislature for 
four years. Both paternal and maternal families were of 
French descent. Mr. Gex attended St. Stanislaws College, 
Bay St. Louis, and Rugby Academy, New Orleans; finished 
his course at Rugby and entered Tulane University, but on 
account of illness was forced to leave during the first year. 
Later he took a law course at the University of Mississippi. 
receiving his degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1903; during 
the s&me year he entered upon active practice of his pro- 
fession at Bay St. Louis. Mr. Gex was Chairman of the 
Election Commissioners of Hancock County from 1904 to 
X906; in the latter year was elected to serve as Election 
Commissioner for the city of Bay St. Louis for two years, 
and also was chosen as Alderman of the Third Ward of the 
city. Was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, a member of the Catholic 
Church and Consul Commander in the order of Woodmen 
of the World. He is not married. 



HARRISON COUNTY. 

JOHN BUNYAN CLARK, of Nugent, son ot WilHnm 
Anthony Clark and wife. Martha (Walker) Clark, was V.orn 
December 36, 1859, at- Handsboro, Harrison County, Miss. 
His parents died when he was seven vears of age and he was 
deprived of early educational advantage, studying the ele- 
mentary branches while at work. When he was twenty- 




Emile Joseph Gex. 




John Bunyan Clark. 



1050 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



four years old he attended school eight months in Hands- 
boro. He engaged in the timber business early in life, and 
at present owns an interest in a sawmill. He was elected a 
member of the Board of Supervisors of Harrison County in 
1894 and served two terms of four years each. In 1903 he 
was elected County Treasurer, and is now serving in that 
position. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Clark is a Democrat, and is a mem- 
ber of the fraternal orders of Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias and Elks. He was married June 3, 1886, to 
Vemell Applewhite Hurlbert, daughter of John H. Hurlbert 
and wife. Martha Hurlbert, of Handsboro, Miss. 




Hillrie Marshall Quin. 




Stephen A. D. Greaves. 



HINDS COUNTY. 

HILLRIE MARSHALL QUIN, of Jackson, was bom 
March 2, 1866, at Holmesville, Pike County, Miss., the son 
of Daniel Hillary Quin and wife, Annie Beatty (Long) Quin. 
His immediate ancestors were native Mississippians; his 
father was a physician of note, a graduate of Kenyon Col- 
lege, Ohio, and of a medical school in Philadelphia. Mr. 
Quin attended Peabody Public School at Summitt, Miss., 
and was prepared for college there by Professor J. M. Sharp, 
entered the University of Mississippi and graduated there 
with degree of A. B. in 1886, being anniversarian of his 
class. He began his life work cvs a school teacher; was Prin- 
cipal of McComb City and Fayette schools; in 1892 engaged 
in. newspaper business at Centreville, which he continued 
until 1902, when he entered the Law School of the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi; took his Bachelor's degree there in 
1904 and immediately began the active practice of his pro- 
fession. He was a member of the State Legislature 1900 
to 1904, and of the Board of Aldermen in Centreville 1900-02. 
Mr. Quin is a Democrat, was delegate to the National Con- 
vention of 1896, and to every State Convention since 18S9, 
and was Presidential Elector of the State at large in 1904; 
he is a member of the Christian Church, is a Mason, 
a Shriner, an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias; Grand 
Chancellor of last named order 1898-99, and has been 
Grand Keeper of Records and Seal since 1900; was 
active promoter in the work of building the Pythian Castles 
at Centerville and at Jackson. He has always been active 
in educational matters; served on Examining Board for 
Teachers in Jefferson County; was a Trustee of the State 
University four years and Business Manager one year. He 
married Nettie Eloise Darden, daughter of Henry and Kate 
Darden, of Jefferson County, and was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Quin was a can- 
didate for Speaker and led in the contest until the last ballot. 

STEPHEN ARNE DECATUR GREAVES, of Jackson 
was bom Febniary 26, 1854, at Livingston, Madison County, 
Miss., the son of Stephen Arne Decatur Greaves and wife. 
Sarah (Lowe) Greaves. The father of the subject of this 
sketch was bom in Marion District. South Carolina, was a 
practicing lawyer at Raymond. Miss., at the time of the 
declaration of war by the United States against Mexico; 
he joined the Raymond Fencibles, which enlisted for the war; 
was elected First Lieutenant; the company joined the First 



i 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1051 



Mississippi Volunteers under command of Col. Jefferson 
Davis, and served throughout the war; after his return 
from Mexico was made a Brigadier-General of State troops 
and elected to the House of Representatives. The subject 
of this sketch attended the common schools of Madison 
County in boyhood; entered the Summerville Institute near 
Shuqualak, Noxubee County, in 1872, and remained two 
sessions. He is a planter by occupation and has taken little 
part in public life; was elected to the House of Representa- 
tives November 5, 1907; is a Democrat and a member of 
the Methodist Church. He was married November 24, 1881, 
in Hinds County, to Julia Estelle Fondren, daughter of 
Richard Fondren and Ella (Douglass) Fondren, formerly of 
Gallatin, Tenn., and later of Jackson, Miss. His wife is of 
South Carolinian ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Greaves have four 
children: Elmore Douglass, Pev-ton Ried, Delia Fondren 
and Sarah Lowe. 



MARSHALL NEY WILLIAMS, of Raymond, was bom 
January 4, 1883, at Duke, Hinds County, Miss., the son of 
John Bell Williams and wife, Florence Virginia (Farris) 
Williams. His immediate ancestors on both sides were 
native Mississippians; his father was Justice of the Peace 
at Utica, Miss., from 1899 to 1903; was Sergeant of Oakley 
convict farm during 1904 and 1905. Mr. Williams attended 
a country- school near his home for a short time and went 
to the Utica schools for four months, but his opportunities 
for education were limited by the fact that he was the oldest 
of a large family, and the demands of farm labor bore upon 
him with special insistence. But he was ambitious and began 
the reading of law in the intervals of his work, and at last 
was able to take up law study in earnest in the office of Hon. 
W. J. Croom at Bolton, where he remained for about a year 
and a half, and was admitted to the bar May 2, 1905. On 
May 26 following he located at Ra>-mond, Miss., for the 
practice of his profession, and has been there ever since. 
He was elected to the House of Representatives November 
5, 1907. Mr. Williams is a Democrat, a Master Mason and 
a Knight of Pythias. He was married May 20, 1906, at 
Utica, Miss., to Emma Rebecca Mathews, daughter of John 
Dennis Mathews and wife, Phoebe Ross Mathews. 



HOLMES COUNTY. 

LARKIN SEYMORE ROGERS, of West, was born 
February- 8, 1859, at Vaiden, Miss., and is the son of Richard 
Thomas and Eleanor (Cain) Rogers. His paternal ancestors 
were English, and on coming to America settled in Virginia 
and later in South Carolina; his maternal ancestors were 
Irish; Patrick Cain, his maternal grandfather, was overseer 
for John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina. Dr. Rogers received 
his elementary education in the country schools of Carrol! 
County, and was a student at the University of Mississijipi 
through the junior year ; entered Tulane University as a 
medical student; was graduated with the degree of M. D. 
in 1885 and entered into the practice of medicine at West, 
Miss., where he has since resided. For the past eighteen 
years Dr. Rogers has held such town offices as health ofBcer, 




\^^'^^^ 



Larkin Seymore Rogers. 



yM ? r,L'^ ' '^;^! : jWi »' "i<g y ...»;^ig ' y.jy.' y .>w. rv^^m^T : !!i*;'V ' ^ '• ^ ^'^^ 



1 



1052 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




James Albert Dicken. 




James Bragg Mitchell. 



school trustee and alderman. He is President of the West 
Banking & Trust Co.; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat and a 
member and deacon of the Baptist Church. Dr. Rogers 
was married December 14, 1886, at Vaiden, Miss., to Ada 
McPherson, daughter of Alfred Adolphus and Martha 
McPherson, of Carroll County. Mr. McPherson is a Con- 
federate veteran and a substantial citizen of his county. 
Dr. and Mrs. Rogers have three children: Marion Sims, 
McPherson and Richard Otis. 

JAMES ALBERT DICKEN, of Durant, was bom 
August 6, 1855, near Kosciusko, Miss., the son of Benjamin 
Burnley Dicken and wife, Mary Jane (Jones) Dicken. Pater- 
nal ancestors came from England and settled in Georgia; 
his father came to Mississippi in 1849 and served as a surgeon 
in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Attend- 
ance upon an eight months' school kept in his neighborhood 
after the war by an old soldier constituted the sum of Mr. 
Dicken's educational opportunities, and in early youth he 
was obliged to take up practical farm work, but he bravely 
made up his deficiencies by diligent reading in his evenings. 
He has been a frequent correspondent of newspapers; has 
always been active in every good cause for temperance, bet- 
ter education and good government, and has often lectured 
before church gatherings. He is a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church from his youth. Mr. Dicken was 
married February 4, 1879, near West, Miss., to Harriet Ann 
Brock, daughter of Hon. John Gallatin Brock and wife, 
Cora (Read) Brock. His wife's great-grandfather came 
from Ireland in 1771. settling in Virginia, whence his sons 
emigrated to Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Dicken have eight 
living children: Julia, Mary Lavinia, John Brock, Benjamin, 
Burnley, Charles Read, Lizzie Montgomery, Bob Howard 
and Nellie. 

JAMES BRAGG MITCHELL, of Goodman, was bom 
March 23, 1862, in Holmes County, the son of David Mitchell 
and wife, Sarah Bell (Dulaney) Mitchell. His paternal 
ancestors came from Scotland to Virginia and thence to 
North Carolina in colonial days. George Mitchell, a pater- 
nal ancestor, was Colonel of a North Carolina regiment dur- 
ing the Revolution. Mr. Mitchell's father was a member of 
the Mississippi Legislature before the Civil War. The first 
school that James B. Mitchell attended was at Goodman, and 
his first teacher was Professor W. H. Magruder, now of the 
A. and M. College at Starkville; he was a student in Vander- 
bilt University. Nashville, for three years, and graduated 
from the Law Department of that institution with degree of 
LL.B. in 1884. He practiced law at Bristol, Tenn.. during 
1886 and 1887, in partnership with Judge W. F. Rhea, then 
moved back to Goodman, gave up practice and moved on to 
a plantation, where he still remains, raising cotton and 
pecans. Mr. Mitchell was a member of the Legislature in 
1900-03; is a Democrat and a member of the Episcopal 
Church; was elected to the House of Representatives No- 
vember 5, 1907- He was married December 26, 18S6, at 
Wytheville, Va.. to Fannie Oglesby Crockett, daughter of 
James Thompson Crockett and wife. Susan Jane Crockett. 



1 



1 



) 



] 

) 

1 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1053 



His wife's ancestors came from Ireland to Virginia, and the 
family claim the famous Davy Crockett — pioneer and 
patriot — as one of their line. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have 
two living children : Mary Park and James Albert Oglesby. 



ISSAQUENA COUNTY. 

LIVINGSTON PEYTON, of Mayersville, was born 
December 6, 1859, at Raymond, Hinds County, Miss., the 
son of Murray Milton Peyton and wife, Malvina Fitzallan 
(Alston) Peyton. His father was a native of Tennessee, his 
mother of Mississippi. Murray M. Peyton was a Confederate 
oflGcer during the war, commanding Company K, Third 
Mississippi Infantry; in civil life he served as Deputy Cir- 
cuit Clerk, Hinds County, 1859-60; Secretary State Senate, 
1870; Chancery Clerk, Hinds County. 1872-76. and Clerk 
or Deputy, Issaquena County, for over twenty years. Liv- 
ingston Peyton's grandfather, Elijah Peyton, was a soldier 
in the War of 181 a. was at Fort Erie and Lundy's Lane; at 
the age of seventy enlisted as a private in a Confederate 
company raised in Copiah County, Miss., by his two sons, 
and served for more than a year, i86i-6a. Mr. Peyton 
obtained his education principally at the common schools 
of Raymond and Jackson ; spent one year at the University 
of Mississippi; his occupation is that of a merchant, at 
Clover Hill, Miss. , He has been Treasurer of Issaquena 
Cpunty two terms; Captain of militia company. "Issaquena 
Guards"; is a Democrat, and member of the Methodist 
Church; elected to the' House of Representatives Novem- 
ber s, 1907. , Mr. Peyton was married February 10, 1886, at 
Mayersville, to Idella Spiars, daughter of James and Lydia 
Spiars; his wife's father was a Confederate soldier. Mr. and 
Mrs. Peyton have five children: Mrs. Shirley (Peyton) 
Richards, of Lake Providence, La.; Gertrude, Livingston 
Susan Elizabeth and Ethel Mae. 




Livingston Peyton. 



ITAWAMBA COUNTY. 

JONAS FRANKLIN DISON. of Eastman, was bom 
in St. Clair County, Ala., and is the son of Thomas Brown 
Dison and his wife, Caroline (Funderburk) Dison. His 
paternal ancestors came from Georgia to Alabama; his 
maternal from South Carolina. Wlien the subject of sketch 
was but two years old, his father died, leaving a wife and 
a family of five young children but poorly provided for. 
After a nine years' battle with poverty his mother married 
J. R. Rabum, who proved a kind stepfather to her boys. 
Mr. Dison was nearly grown up, however, before he was able 
to begin his education. His family having moved to Missis- 
sippi, he first attended a country school in Itawamba County; 
in 1897 entered Oaklin Ck)llege, and later, having secured 
means by teaching rural schools, he attended a college in 
Henderson, Tenn., during the years 1904-06, graduating in 
the last named year with the degree of B. S. He has since 
pursued the occupation of a teacher in Itawamba County; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November s, 
1907. Mr. Dison is a Democrat, a Missionary Baptist, a 
Mason and a Woodman of the World. He is not married. 




^y 



Jonas Franklin Dison. 



1054 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Mark Ashley Dees. 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

' MARK ASHLEY DEES, of Scranton, was born August 
27, 1846, near Pollard, Conecuh County, Ala., the son of 
Calvin Elias Dees and wife, Mary Charlotte (Tippins) Dees. 
Paternal ancestors lived in South Carolina, maternal in 
Florida and Alabama. Mr. Dees attended the country 
schools of Mobile County, Ala., and of Jackson County, Miss.; 
he had no opportunity for a collegiate education. He has 
been occupied as a railroad contractor, a saw-mill operator 
and inventor; he served in the State Legislature from 1896 
to 1900, as Floater Representative for Jackson and Harrison 
Counties. Mr. Dees has devoted both time and means to 
the effort toward constructing at Pascagoula a great deep- 
water port for the State of Mississippi; he is a Democrat, a 
Baptist and member of the Knights of Honor, and was elected 
to the House of Representatives November s, 1907. He was 
married in 1870, at Moss Point, Miss., to Annie Starkey Hill, 
daughter of Thomas Hill and wife, Martha (Moore) Hill, of 
Newbem* Ala. His wife's family on both sides came from 
North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Dees have eight children: 
Thomas Moore Dees, of Midlothian, Tex. ; Mark Ashley Dees, 
Jr., also of Midlothian; Pattie (Dees) Hopson.of Roff, Okla.; 
Adelle Rand (Dees) King, of Midlothian; Daisy May and 
Annie Starkey Dees, teachers; Beatrix and Lorraine Dees, 
at schQoL 



JASPER COUNTY. 




Milton Alexander Lewis. 




Joseph Oliver Cowart. 



MILTON ALEXANDER LEWIS, of Rose Hill, was 
bom December 19, 1863, at that place, the son of Alexander 
Lewis and wife, Amanda Fitzallen (Ryan) Lewis. His pater- 
nal ancestors came from Virginia to Georgia in the early part 
of the last century; his great-grandfather, Walden Lewis, 
fought in the Indian wars. Maternal line was of Irish stock. 
His father was a Confederate soldier and served four, years 
under Joseph E. Johnston. Mr. Lewis was educated in the 
schools of his native town, attending the Rose Hill High 
School when it was taught by Captain "W. C. Day. His 
occupations have been those of commercial traveler and 
farmer; was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
bers, ^907. He is a Democrat, a member of theM. E. Church, 
South, and of the Woodmen of the World. He was married 
February i, 1900, at Meridian, to Minnie Lee Beason, daugh- 
ter of Richard and Julia Beason, of that city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis have four children : Amanda Fitzallen, Homer, Pauline 
and Milton Alexander, Jr. 



JEFFERSON DAVIS COUNTY. 

JOSEPH OLIVER COWART, of Prentiss, was bom 
May 18, 187 1, at Cross Roads, Jackson County, Miss., the 
son of Dr. James Cowart and wife. Alletha Roselle (.Moody) 
Cowart. Both parents were native Mississippians. Mr. 
Cowart attended the common schools of Jackson County; 
Mississippi College in igoi, but remained for one session only; 
later, took a law course at Millsaps College, received his 
degree and was admitted to the bar in 1903; was elected 
to the House of Representatives November s- 1907. Mr- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1055 



Cowart is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, a 
Mason, and has held all offices up to Chancellor Commander 
in the order of Knights of Pythias. He has achieved a suc- 
cessful practice in his profession, and it was largely through 
his influence that his county received the name of the great 
Mississippi leader, Jefferson Davis, and he was elected its 
first Representative in the Legislature. Mr. Cowart was 
married January 6, 1898, at Lucedale, to Mary Matilda 
Miller, daughter of John M. Miller and wife, Martha Miller, 
of Vernal, Miss. Mr. and Mrs. Cowart have four living 
children: Mary Alletha, Joseph Homer. Paul Bryan and 
Willie Augustine. 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

JOSEPH EDWIN LAMB, of Union Church, was bom 
January i, 1857, at Marion, Lauderdale County, Miss., the 
son of Asa Green Lamb and wife, Josephine Elizabeth (Perr>') 
Lamb. He has no record of paternal ancestry, but on his 
mother's side can trace his lineage back to John Perry, who 
came from England to Roxbury, Mass., in 1632, with the 
apostle John Eliot, the common ancestor of Perry families 
throughout the States; Mr. Lamb's mother came from the 
Perrys of Georgia. His father, A. G. Lamb, enhsted for the 
Mexican "War at sixteen years of age, and was wounded at 
Cerro Gordo; he entered the Confederate Army in 1862, and 
died from vrounds received at Port Hudson. Mr. Lamb 
obtained his education from attendance at district schools, 
1865 to 1875; he did not go to college. His occupation has 
always been that of a planter. He is a Democrat, and has 
served on the Executive Committee of his county; is a mem- 
ber and trustee of the Presbyterian Church; was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He has 
been twice married: November 2, 1876, to Lenorah Jane 
Gillis, daughter of David W. Gillis and Louisa (Scott) Gillis. 
Mrs. Lamb died April 28, 1900. Mr. Lamb was again mar- 
ried January 9, 1902, to Nora Alsworth, daughter of William 
Alsworth. By his first marriage Mr. • Lamb had eleven 
children, nine of whom are living, as follows: Mrs. Louada 
(Lamb) Blue, of Brookhaven; Mrs. Lizzie (Lamb) Fairley 
of Union Church; Joseph Edwin, Jr., Lenora. John, Alice 
Henry Gillis, Martha and David DeWitt. 




Joseph Edwin Lamb. 



JONES COUNTY. 

LaFAYETI'E STALN'TON. of Laurel, was bom Octo- 
ber 13, 1852, near Monroeville, Ala., the son of David Timms 
Stainton and wife, Cebra Ann (Rumbley) Stainton. Pater- 
nal ancestors were of Irish descent; maternal of Scotch; both 
families came to Mississippi from Alabama. His father 
served during the Civil War in the Confederate Army, at 
Fort Morgan and around Mobile. Mr. Stainton attended the 
common schools of .-Mabama ami Mississippi, and took his 
academic course under Prof. Charles A. Huddleston. Walnut 
Grove, Miss., His occupations have been those of teachmg 
and journalism. ' He taught in the common schools, 1873- 
18S3; edited and published the Neshoba Democrat, at Phila- 
delphia, Miss., 1883-1890; taught at Laurel, Miss., in 1891-2. 
He was Superintendent of Education of Neshoba County, 




LaFayette Stainton. 



1056 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



i88a-i886; represented his county in the Legislature, 1888- 
1890 ; was postmaster at Laurel, 1895-1899, and Mayor of 
that town, 1 899-1903. Mr. Stainton is a Democrat, a 
Methodist, a member of the Masonic Order, of the Knights 
and Ladies of Honor and of the Woodmen of the World; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November s. 
1907. He was married October 13. 1881, to Mary Hastletine 
Salter, daughter of Samuel Aaron and Theodosia Salter, of 
Plattsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Stainton have nine children: 
Mrs. Ruby Valma (Stainton) Weems. of Laurel; Mrs. Cebra 
Pearl (Stainton) Mc Arthur, of Meridian; and Robert Irvin, 
Edwin LaFayette, Samuel David. Alda Virginia, Everet 
Marvin, William Frederic and Hubert Maryon. 




Sanford Martin Graham. 



KEMPER COUNTY. 

SANFORD MARTIN GRAHAM, of DeKalb, was bom 
January 12, 1880, at that place, the son of John William 
Graham and wife, Rebecca Jane (Hunnicutt) Graham. His 
paternal ancestors were from Alabama, maternal from 
Georgia. His father enlisted in Company B. Thirty-fifth 
Mississippi Regiment, being discharged by the medical board 
because of physical weakness; he enlisted again in the 
Twenty-fourth Mississippi. Mr. Graham attended the com- 
mon schools of Centerville, then entered the high school at 
Scooba. where, with commendable energy, he paid his school 
expenses by acting as janitor. He entered Millsaps College, 
Jackson, where he won the Sophomore medal in 1902, and 
was chosen as College Representative in the State Oratorical 
Contest. He graduated from the Literary Department with 
degree of A. B. in 1905, and took his degree on completion of 
the law course in 1906; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5. 1907. Mr. Graham is a Democrat, 
a member of the M. E. Church, South, a Royal Arch Mason, a 
Woodman of the World and member of the Order of the 
Eastern Star. He was married December 27, 1906, at Oak 
Grove, to Jessie Clare Rush, daughter of Dudley Miles Rush 
and Sarah Ann (White) "Rush. His wife's ancestors were 
from North Carolina. 




Guy Jack Rencher. 



GUY JACK RENCHER. of DeKalb, was bom Decem- 
ber 18, 1877, near Scooba, Kemper County, Miss., son of 
A. M. Rencher and wife. May (Jack) Rencher. Both lines 
of his ancestors came from Ireland in early times, settling in 
North Carolina. Captairi James Jack, who was chosen to 
carry the Declaration of the Mechlenburg Convention of 
May, 1775. to the Continental (Congress in Philadelphia, was 
the great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch. 
He commanded a company through the Revolutionary War; 
his son was a soldier of the War of 1812, while his great- 
grandson. A. M. Rencher, fought through the Civil War 
with an Alabama regiment and surrendered at last with part 
of Hood's men at Meridian, Miss. Mr. Rencher attended 
the Mississippi public schools in boyhood; finished a special 
English course at Henderson. Tenn.. in 189S; was graduated 
from the Law School of the University of Mississippi in June, 
:90i, and was admitted to the bar in September of the same 
year. He has been successful in his practice; he was elected 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1057 



to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Rencher is a Democrat, a Methodist and a Mason. He was 
married, May 4, 1904. to Rosa Mae Flake, daughter of John 
and EHza Flake, of Oak Grove. Mr. and Mrs. Rencher have 
one child, Guy Jack, Jr. 



LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 

CAULDER EVANS SLOUGH, of Oxford, was bom 
January 23, 1873, in Lafayette County, Miss., and is the son 
of John Nelson Slough and his wife, Martha Willie (Patton) 
Slough. His paternal ancestors were originally from Ger- 
many and s'ettled in North Carolina, whence, in 1838, the 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Moses Slough, emi- 
grated to West Tennessee, and, twenty years later, moved 
to Lafayette County, Mississippi. Mr. Slough's maternal an- 
cestors came from Georgia to this State in 1836, settling near 
Lafayette Springs. His father enlisted in the Confederate 
service in April. 1864, and served till the war ended. Mr. 
Slough obtained his early education in the public schools, 
and later attended Abbeville Normal College and Tula Nor- 
mal College, graduating at Tula in 1894 with degree of B. S. 
His professional studies were carried on at the University 
of Mississippi, where, at his graduation in 1906, he was given 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Mr. Slough held the 
office of Clerk of the Circuit Court oi Lafayette County, to 
which he was elected in 1899, and again chosen in 1903, 
his term ending in 1908. He has also been County Registrar 
since 1900, and has served as Alderman of the town of 
Oxford. Mr. Slough is a Democrat, a member and Steward 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a Royal Arch and 
Council Mason; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He was married June i, 1897. to Grace 
Cearley, daughter of Eli Cearley and his wife, Mary Lou 
Cearley, of Dallas. Mr. and Mrs. Slough have one child, a 
daughter. Jonnie Ethelyn Slough. 

LEE MAURICE RUSSELL, of Oxford, was bom 
November i6, 1875, at Dallas, Lafayette County, and is the 
son of William Eaton Russell and his wife, Louisa Jane 
(Mackey) Russell. His paternal ancestors came from Eng- 
land, maternal from Scotland, both settling in Virginia; 
his father ser\-ed as a Confederate soldier in Captain Brad- 
ford's company of artillery with the Army of Northern Vir- 
ginia. Mr. Russell attended the public schools of Lafayette 
County; was graduated at Toccapola College in 1897 with 
degree of B. S.; entered the University of Mississippi and 
was graduated in 1901 with B. P. degree, and took the junior 
law course, completing it in 1901; he passed e.xamination 
for the bar, then re-entered the University and took the 
further course in law, receiving the degree of Bachelor of 
Law in 1903; has since svicceeded well in his practice and 
is now a member of the firm of Falkner & Russell. Oxford. 
Mr. Russell is a Democrat, a Methodist. Mason and Knight 
of Pythias. He was married June 28, 1905, at Missoula, 
Mont., to Ethel Mary Day, daughter of Howard E. Day and 
wife. Louise Day. of Missoula. His wife's matenial ancestors 
came from Virginia. In college Mr. Russell was a leader in 
a movement againsc fraternities. He was elected to the 
House of Representatives November 5, 1907. 
34 




Caulder Evans Slough. 




Lee Maurice Russell, 



1058 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



LAMAR COUNTY. 




Joseph Lewis Bryant. 



JOSEPH LEWIS BRYANT, of BaxtervUle. was bom 
December i, 1852, at Williamsburg, Covington County, Miss., 
and is the son of Levy Lewis Bryant and Sarah (Grantham)i 
Bryant. His father was a member of the Covington County 
Board of Police in 1855, and served as a private in a com- 
pany of homeguards during the latter part of the Civil War. 
His ancestors emigrated to Mississippi from South Carolina. 
Mr. Bryant was educated in the private schools of Jones and 
Perry Counties under the instruction of E. W. Goff. D. P. 
Mclnnis and G. D. Hartfield. He is an active member of 
the Baptist Church, in charge of the Bay Creek congregation 
of that denomination; is a Democrat, Master Mason and 
member of the Farmer's Union. Mr. Bryant was married 
February 14, 1878, to Eliza Ellen Rankin, daughter of James 
Crofford and Harriett (Tevis) Rankin. Mr. and Mrs. Bryant 
have seven children: Emily (Bryant) Saucier, William Cullen, 
Joseph Lewis, Crofford, Lucretia (Bryant) Cammoer, Claude 
and Levy." 



LAUDERDALE COUNTY. 




iAJ^ 



Htigh McQueen Street. 



HUGH McQueen street, of Meridian, was bom 
January 7. 1833, in Moore County, N. C, the son of Donald 
Street and wife, Lydia (McBryde) Street. His ancestors on 
both sides were from Scotland; his father's family were early 
settlers in Prince William County, Va.; later they went to 
North Carolina, where his great-uncle, Hugh McQueen, was a 
member of the Constitutional Convention of 1835, and later 
Attorney-General of the State. His maternal grandfather, 
Archibald McBryde, served two terms in the United States 
Congress. Mr. Street attended an "old-field school" in 1840, 
and in 1847 and 1848 attended the Carthage High School for 
three terms. He entered the Confederate Army in 1861, and 
served — much of the time on detached duty — till 1865. 
In 1873 he took up the fire insurance business, in which he 
is still engaged. He holds a number of important positions 
in his city, as vice-president of a bank, director of local cor- 
porations, etc. He was elected to the State Legislature in 
1869 and re-elected four times from Prentiss County; de- 
clined nomination in 1S79, and was again chosen from 
Lauderdale County in 1889, also in 1891; elected Speaker 
in 1892 for the third time but resigned at the session of 1894. 
Mr. Street voted for Bell and Everett in i860, but has ever 
since been a Democrat; is a Scotch Presbyterian and a 
Mason; was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
ber s, 1907, and was elected Speaker for the fourth time on 
his seventy-fifth birthday. He was married twice: (i) 
^November 2, 1858, to Charlotte Elizabeth, daughter of C. A. 
and Elizabeth Prindle, of Daricn, Ga.; (2) October 13, 1887. 
to Charlotte Augusta, daughter of Daniel C. and Charlotte P. 
Ryder, of Connecticut; the parents of his wives were twins. 
Mr. Street has five living children: Charles R. Street, of 
Chicago; Albert J. Street, of Canton, 111.; Mrs. Bessie Lee 
(Street) Coburn. of Meridian; Ethel (at home), and Mrs. 
Lottie Prentiss (Street) Champenois, of Hattiesburg. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1059 



WILLIAM RICE DENTON, of Meridian, was bom at 
Daleville. Lauderdale County, Miss., October 12, 1847, and 
is the son of Harvey Wesley Denton and wife, Willie Carpenter 
Denton. His paternal ancestors came to Mississippi from 
South Carolina. The father of the subject of this sketch 
settled at Daleville, Miss., in 1837. Mr. Denton attended 
the primary schools of Lauderdale County; entered Cooper 
Institute, imder the instruction of Thomas A. Boydston and 
J. L. Cooper. He is a farmer; served as Magistrate in his 
county from 1884 to 1888; elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives from Lauderdale County in 1890; re-elected in 
1892, 189s, 1899 and 1903; was a soldier of the Confederacy 
and served as a private in the Second Mississippi Regiment. 
Mr. Denton is a Democrat; merrrber of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church; Mason and Woodman of the World; 
married October 30, 1867, to Martha Ellen Blanks, daughter 
of William Henry Blanks and wife. Narcissus Young. Mrs. 
Denton's ancestors came to America. from England. Mr. and 
Mrs. Denton have two children: William Nelson and Martha 
(Denton) Warren. In the House of 1 904-1 908 Mr. Denton 
was a member of the following committees: Appropriations, 
Pensions (Ch.) , Fees and Salaries and Benevolent Institutions . 
He is the senior member of the^ House in point of service, 
having been a member for eighteen years, which is the longest 
continuous term in the history of the Mississippi Legislature. 
He was re-elected to the House without opposition Novem- 
ber s, 1907. 

JOSEPIi DUDLEY STENNIS, of Meridian, was bom 
December ai, 1863, in Kemper County, Miss., and is the son 
of Adam Turner Stennis and wife, Julia (Edwards) Stennis. 
His paternal ancestors came to Mississippi from South Caro- 
lina; maternal from Alabama. The father of the subject of 
this sketch represented Kemper County in the Legislature 
of 1858; was a soldier of the Confederacy and served as 
Lieutenant-Colonel of the Fifth Mississippi Regiment. Mr. 
Stennis attended the primary schools of Lauderdale County; 
entered the University of Mississippi but did not graduate; 
is a farmer; elected to the House of Representatives from 
Lauderdale County in 1895; re-elected in 1899 and 1903. 
Mr. Stennis is a Democrat; was married at Meridian. Miss., 
June 10, 1897, to Pearl Allen Mahan, daughter of Hiram 
Mahan and wife, Susan. Mr. and Mrs. Stennis have three 
children: Sue May, Joseph Dudley and Jamie Melba. In 
the House of 1904-1908 Mr. Stennis was a member of the 
following committees: Ways and Means (Ch.), Rules. Benev- 
olent Institutions, Penitentiary. He was re-elected to the 
House November 5, 1907, and at the expiration of his present 
term will have served continuously for sixteen years. 



LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

ELDRED LEVI HOLLOWAY BIRD, of Tryus, was 
bom August 34, 1868, at Tryus. Lawrence County. Miss.. 
and is the son of Holloway Ivanhoe Bird and wife. Alice 
(Jett) Bird. His ancestors came to Mississippi from South 
Carolina. The father of the subject of this sketch was a 
soldier of the Confederacy, Captain Company K, Fifteenth 







William Rice Denton. 




Joseph Dudley Stennis. 




Eldred L. H. Bird. 



1060 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



South Carolina Volunteers, and has been a teacher in the 
schools of Lawrence County since 1867; was in the Legisla- 
ture of 1876 and 1878; delegate from Lawrence County to 
the Constitutional Convention of 1890. Mr. Bird attended 
the primary schools of Lawrence County; received his educa- 
^ , tion mainly under the instruction of his father, who is a 
graduate of ColumVjia College, South Carolina; read law in 
the office of Hon. George S. Dodds at Hazlehurst, Miss.; in 
1889 entered the Law School of the University of Missis- 
sippi and was graduated in June, 1890, with the degree of 
LL.B.; took first honor in class; admitted to the bar in 
December, 1890, at Monticello, Miss.; elected to the House 
of Representatives from Lawrence County, November 3, 
1903. Mr. Bird is a Democrat; member of the Baptist 
Church, clerk; was married November 25, 1891, at Tryus, 
Miss., to Emma Frances Hennington, daughter of B. D. 
Hennington and wife, Mary Narcissus. Mrs. Bird's ancestors 
came from South Carolina. Her father was a Confederate 
soldier and served as Lieutenant of Company C, Sixteenth 
Mississippi Regiment. Mr. and Mrs. Bird have seven chil- 
dren: Irene Courtney, Grady Luke, HoUoway Hennington, 
Audley Verne, Eldred Ian. Lester Harold and Emma Myrtle. 
In the House of 1904-1908 Mr. Bird was a member of the 
following committees: Judiciary, County Affairs, Census and 
Apportionment, Engrossed Bills. Redistricting the State. 
He was re-elected to the House November 5, 1907. 




Luther Augustine Zachry. 



ff^iS 




George Henry Hill. 



LEAKE COUNTY. 

LUTHER AUGUSTINE ZACHRY. of Lena, was bom 
June 5, 1870, at Franklin, Heard County. Ga., the son of 
Henry Louis Zachry and wife. Sallie C. (Thomas) Zachry. 
His paternal family came to America with James Oglethorpe 
in 1732; his grandfather, Dave Zachry, was a member of 
the Georgia Legislature in 1S76, and was nominated for 
Congress in 1880, but declined the candidacy on account of 
his advanced years; his father was a Confederate soldier 
serving in the ranks the last two years of the war. Mr. 
Zachry attended the common schools in Franklin, studied 
one year, 1891, at college in Carrollton, Ga.. the following 
year was a teacher at Rockalo Academy. He entered the 
mercantile business at Carrollton, Ga.. in 1893, five years 
later he sold out there and came to Lena. Miss., where 
he opened up a business as general merchant, in which he is 
still successfully engaged. He was elected to the House of 
Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Zachry is a Demo- 
crat, a Methodist, also a Mason and Clerk of his Camp of 
Woodmen of the World. He was married January 10. 1893, 
at Carrollton. Ga.. to Willie Gcrtriide Gilbert, daughter of 
William F. Gilbert and wife. Choicie R. Gilbert. Mr. and 
Mrs. Zachry have four children: Roy. Webb. Gertrude and 
L. A. 

LEE COUNTY. 

GEORGE HENRY HILL, JR., of Tupelo, was bom 
January 28, 1883, in Lee County, Miss., the son of George 
Henry Hill and wife, Nancy Anderson ^.Recs) Hill. His 
father was bom in Worcestershire, England, came to America 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1061 



in 1868. settled at Tupelo, Miss., in 1879; his maternal ^and- 
father. Captain John T. Rees, was an officer in the Confed- 
erate Army. He was educated at the graded and hiyh 
schools of Tupelo, where he made a good record as a student. 
He took a law course at the University of Mississippi and 
received his Bachelor's degree in 1906, entering imme- 
diately upon practice at Tupelo. In youth Mr. Hill formed 
habits of energy and perseverance, which have proven val- 
uable aids to his success in maturity. He is a Democrat, 
filling the office of delegate to the State Convention of 1904; 
is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and of the 
Woodmen of the World. Was elected to the House of 
Representatives November 5, 1907. He was married Octo- 
ber 13, 1906, at Tupelo, to Myrtle Motley, daughter of 
Robert A. Motley and wife, Josephine (Sanders) Motley. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hill have one child, Ruth loleen. 



PARIS ALPHONSO GREENE, of Verona, was bom 
February 24, 1856, at Richmond, Itawamba County, Miss., 
the son of Joseph. Gilbert Greene and wife, Annie Tranquilla 
(Conwill) Greene. His ancestors on both sides were Vir- 
ginians; his grandfather. William G. Greene, was a grandson 
of General Nathaniel Greene of Revolutionary fame; his 
grandmother was a niece of Governor Wise, of Virginia; 
his father was a Confederate soldier, serving from May, 
1861, to April, 1865. Mr. Greene obtained his education in 
the public schools of Itawamba County; he did not take a 
collegiate course. His occupation has been that of farmer 
and stockman; has made three importations of fine stock 
from Spain. He was Postmaster at Verona in 1884; is now a 
member of the Board of Aldermen of that town. He is a 
Democrat; was for four years Secretary of the County 
Executive Committee; is a member of the M. E. Church, 
South, a Mason and a Woodman of the World. Was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Greene was married October s, 1880, to Turza Harkreader, 
daughter of Major Absalom G. Harkreader and wife, 
Martha Tinnie (Vivrett) Harkreader, of Verona. His wife's 
father's family came from England and settled in Virginia, 
her mother's people were Tennesseans of Irish descent. 




Fans Alphonso Greene. 



LEFLORE COUNTY. 



i 



JOHN A.MBROSE TYSO.N, of Greenwood, was bom 
December 11, 1874. at Denmark, Madison County, Tenn., 
the son of John Ambrose Tyson and wife, Elizabeth (Ewjng) 
Tyson. His father was a native Tennessean and a phy- 
sician of note in his community; his mother was a Missis- 
sippian. Mr. Tyson attended the public schools of Den- 
mark in boyhood; entered the Southwestern Baptist Uni- 
versity, Jackson, Tenn., wliere he was graduated in 1894 
with the degree of B. S. and was winner of the Best Debater's 
medal of that year. He studied law at Cumberland Uni- 
versity, Lebanon, Tenn., where he took his Bachelor's 
degree in 1898; he has since practiced his profession at 
Jackson, Tenn.. and Greenwood, Miss. He was a member 



1062 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



of the Tennessee Legislature during the session of 190.3, and 
was elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat and a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, also of his college 
fraternity. He is" not married. 




Marshall McCxillough. 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 

MARSHALL McCULLOUGH. of Brookhaven. was born 
on his father's farm in^ Lincoln County, and is the son of 
Albert Gallatin Brown McCullough and wife, Arminda 
(Tyler) McCullough. His paternal ancestors were of Scotch- 
Irish descent; his great-grandfather, Billie McCullough, 
went from North Carolina to Georgia during the Revolution, 
and after that war wa^i over came to Mississippi. His 
mother's family was one of those brought to America by 
James Oglethorpe. Mr. McCullough attended the common 
schools of Lincoln County in boyhood; entered Mississippi 
College at Clinton in the fall of 1892 and was graduated in 
June, 1897, with the degree of A. B. That spring he %vas 
first orator of the Hermenian Literary Society and was chosen 
to represent the college in the Inter-Collegiate Oratorical 
Contest of that year. He was Principal of the Braxton 
Collegiate Institute from 1897 to 1902, and during that time 
read law imder Judge Edward Mayes; he then studied for 
one session at the University of Virginia, after v/nich he was 
admitted to the bar and began practice at Brookhaven, 
where he still carries on a successful law business. He is 
widely known as a public speaker; it was largely through 
his efforts that, in 1906, Brookhaven succeeded in applying 
the party primary principle to municipal elections. He 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5. 
1907. Mr. McCullough is a Democrat; has been for years 
Chairman of the County Executive Committee ; is a Baptist 
'and Woodman of the World. He is not married. 




William Robert Moody. 



LOWNDES COUNTY. 

WILLIAM ROBERT MOODY, of Columbus, was bom 
March 2, i868, at Cobb's Switch. Lowndes County. Miss., 
the son of John Mason Moody and wife, Laura E. (Tabb) 
Moody. His paternal ancestors came from North Carolina; 
maternal from Virginia, both being of English descent. 
The grandfather of the subject of this sketch was a member 
of the North Carolina Senate for several years and of the 
Secession Convention of 1S61; his father was a student at 
the University of Virginia when the Civil War broke out; 
left college and raised a company in Northampton County, 
N. C; was in the Seven Days' fight before Richmond, after 
which he was sent home invalided. Mr. Moody was reared 
by his grandmother in Petersburg, Va.; attended the Uni- 
versity School in that city six years, then entered the Law 
School of the University of Virginia, where he took a two 
years* course in one year, receiving in iSSg a diploma on 
Constitutional and International Law. Has not practiced 
his profession but has been a farmer in Lowndes County 
since 1890. He was elected to the House of Representa- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1063 



tives November 5, igo?. He is a Democrat, a^Methodist 
and a member of the Independent Order of Red Men. He 
was married December 21, 1898, at Columbus to Daisy Bell 
Butler, daughter of James Henry Butler and Fanny Clemen- 
tine (Walton; Butler. His wife's ancestry was Virginian, of 
English descent. Mrs. Moody died in September, 1903- 
Mr. Moody has two children: William Robert, Jr., and 
James Butler. 



THOMAS AUSTIN STINSON, of Columbus, was bom 
March 21, 1845, in Pickens County, Alabama, the son of 
John Thomas Stinson and his wife, Mary Brooks (Haynie) 
Stinson. His father was a native of South Carolina and 
served in the Confederate Army during 1864-65. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was educated at Spring Hill Academy, 
Pickens County, Alabama, when that well known institution 
was under the super\'ision of Rev. Matthev,- Lyon. At the 
age of seventeen he entered the Confederate service as pri- 
vate in Company C, Forty-first Alabama Regiment, Col. 
M. L. Stansel commanding; took part in battles of Mur- 
freesboro, Chickamauga, Knoxville, Drury's Bluff and 
Petersburg and minor engagements and was several times 
wounded; was with the array on retreat from Petersburg 
and surrendered at Appomattox April 9, 1865. From 1867 
to 1885 he was engaged in mercantile business, and since 
then has given his attention to farming. Mr. Stinson was 
Justice of the Peace in Lowndes County 1888 to 1892, and 
represented that county in the State Legislature in 1892 
smd 1894. He is a Democrat, a Baptist, a Mason and an 
Odd Fellow. Was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He was married May 16, 1876, in 
Memphis , Tenn., to S-usan Emily Weaver, daughter of 
Frederick Tolbert Weaver and wife, Susan Elizabeth Weaver, 
of Lowndes County, Miss. Mr. and Mrs. Stinson have eight 
children: Tolbert Weaver, Annie Eloise, Ctirtis Austin, 
William Haynie. Susan Emily, Tom Brooks, Corinne and 
Frederick Quimby. - 



. *^ 5^. V 




Thomas Austin Stinson. 



BASCOMB GURLEY HULL, of Columbus, was bom 
February 5, 1872. at Providence, Pickens County, Ala., the 
son of William Seaborn Hull and wife, Man,' Cames (Taggart) 
Hull. Both paternal and maternal ancestors came from 
Ireland to South Carolina, thence to Alabama, and later to 
this State. Mr. Hull's father enlisted in Company I, Forty- 
third Mississippi as a private, and was promoted to Sergeant; 
was wounded at the siege of Vicksburg, was also in John- 
son's retreat from Tennessee to Atlanta. Mr. Hull attended 
the public schools of his vicinity; entered Farmers" College 
at Millport, Ala., in 1S89, and spent four years there, teach- 
ing in his vacations, then taught two years and after that 
attended the luka Normal Institute, taking the B. S. degree 
in 1897. Teaching ;s Mr. Hull's fixed profession; he has 
been in charge of Rural Hill School, his present position, 
for twelve years, during which time there has been great 
advancement both in increased enrollment and in the erec- 
tion of a fine building. He wa- elected to the House of 
Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Hull is a Democrat; 
a member of the M. E. Church. South, a Mason, Odd Fellow 




Bascomb Gurley Hull. 



1064 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



and Woodman of the World. He has held no political office, 
but has been Commissioner of Roads and Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Tuscaloosa Road Taxing District. He was 
married December 37, 1898, at Melborne, Ala., to Helen 
Blanche Francis, daughter of John Adams and Harriet Louise 
Oden Francis. His wife's ancestors came from England 
about 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Hull have two living children: 
Hallie Juanita and Harold Cook. 




Richard Watson Stewart. 



MADISON COUNTY. 

RICHARD WATSON STEWART, of Madison, was bom 
October 15, 1847, in Madison County, the son of George 
Washington Stewart and wife. Mary Ellen (Crozier) Stewart. 
Paternal ancestors were from Tennessee; maternal from 
Ireland, also by way of the "Big Bend" State. Mr. Stewart 
attended what wa.=; known as the "old field" type of school 
before the war; was also for a time at Madison College, then 
at Sharon. He enlisted in the Confederate Army at the age 
of sixteen in Company F, Wood's Cavalry Regiment, Adams' 
Brigade; he was afterwards transferred to the artillery 
service. Mr. Stewart entered upon mercantile business in 
1870 and continued it for many years, then returned to his 
farm and became a strawberry planter. He is much inter- 
ested in "diversified farming." Mr. Stewart long filled the 
office of Magistrate, was for eight years on the Board of 
Supervisors of his county; called the first convention of 
Supervisors in the State and was its first President; also has 
been twice appointed as a trustee of the Insane Hospital at 
Jackson. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat. In reconstruction 
times acted with the "Yazoo Coimty men," and is now one 
of the State Executive Committee; is also a Methodist and 
has been Sunday-school superintendent for twenty-five years 
He was married November 36, 1874, at Phoenix, to Mary 
Wesley HoUoman, daughter of John Barrett and Nancy 
Helen (Bruffay) Holloman. His wife's ancestry is Vir- 
ginian of English and Irish descent. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart 
have two children: Mrs. Willie Minter (Stewart) Montgomery 
andTommie Louise. 




John Bennett Martin. 



JOHN BENNETT MARTIN, of Cameron, was bom 
June 27, 1842, in the northwestern part of Madison County, 
Miss., the son of James Martin and wife, Dorothy (Allen) 
Martin. His paternal ancestors came from Georgia; ma- 
ternal from Scotland, settling in Virginia prior to the Revo- 
lutionary War. Mr. Martin attended the common schools 
of his county before the Civil War, also studied at Lagrange 
Synodical College, Tennessee, from September, i860, to 
April, 1861. Enlisted in May, 1861, in Company G. Eight- 
teenth Mississippi Regiment, and served till the war was 
ended. He read law at home, was admitted to the bar and 
practiced his profession in Madison and adjoining counties. 
He was a member of the State Legislature from 1896 to 1900; 
has been on the Board of Supervisors since 1904; was 
elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. 
Mr. Martin is a Democrat, and served on the Executive Com- 
mittee 1901 to 1905; is also a member of the Methodist 
Church. He was married February 20, 1868, in Northwest 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMEN'T. 



1065 



Madison County, to Marina Caroline Smith, daughter of 
Thomas Addison Smith and Elizabeth Jane Smith. His 
wife's family came from North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin have six children: James Thomas Martin, of Inver- 
ness; Mrs. Meta (Martin) Muse, of Sharon; Wesley Addison 
Martin, of Cameron; Amelia May Martin, Cameron ; Richard 
Cuthbert Martin, of Leakesville; and Bessie Pearl (Martin) 
Scott, of Vicksburg. 



MARION COUNTY. 

ALONZO LEWIS YATES, of Columbia, was bom Octo- 
ber 22, i88s, at Utica, Hinds County, Miss., the son of Daniel 
Thomas Yates and wife. Marguerite Jane (Murchison) 
Yates. The father of the subject of this sketch was a 
native Mississippian and was a Captain in the Confederate 
Army during the war between the States. Mr. Yates ob- 
tained his education in Columbia High School and in the 
Jefferson Military College at Washington, Miss., and gradu- 
ated from the Law School, of the University of Mississippi - 
in 1906 with degree of LL.B. The same year he began 
practice in his town, and since that time he has been era- 
ployed in every important murder case in the county; was 
attorney for the State in the Lewis Dennis case at Raymond 
and was successful in securing the death sentence. It is a 
fact worth noting that Mr. Yates could not begin the practice 
of his profession until the Chancellor removed the disabilities 
of minority; he is a member of the State Democratic Execu- 
tive Committee, the most youthful member of the body; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. Mr. Yates is a Democrat, a member of the Episcopal 
Church, but the only secret order to which he has allied 
himself is the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity of his University. 
He is not married. 




Alonzo Lewis Yates. 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

JOHN CALHOON, of Holly Springs, was bom at Can- 
ton, Madison County, August 8, 1841, the son of George 
Calhoon and his wife, Louisiana (Brandenburg) Calhoon. 
His father was a lawyer of Kentucky, who settled at Canton 
in 1838. The subject of this sketch attended the common 
schools of Canton ; enlisted in the Confederate Army on the 
breaking out of the war. serving throughout the struggle; 
held the rank of Lieutenant in Company M, Woods' Cavalry 
Regiment, Wirt Adams' Brigade, when he surrendered with 
General Forrest's command in 1865. He attended a law 
school in Lebanon, Tenn., for a year, was admitted to the 
bar in 1867 and practiced his profession in Canton for sev- 
eral years. Mr. Calhoon represented Marshall County in 
the Legislature of 1872-73 and was the author of a bill 
which became a law at that session prohibiting a married 
man from selling his homestead without the consent of his 
wife. He has been eight times elected Mayor of Holly 
Springs; is a Democrat and member of tlie Episcopal Church. 
Was elected to the House of Representatives November 5. 
1907. Was married during the war to Carrie Hill, daughter 
of William R. Hill and Nancy Hill, and three years after her 




John Calhoon. 



1066 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT, 



death was married to Sallie Pugh Lea, daughter of Dr. Willis 
M. Lea and wife, Sarah Wilson Lea. of Holly Springs. Dr. 
Lea was a member of the Mississippi convention that passed 
the Ordinance of Secession. Mr. and Mrs. Calhoon have 
eight children: Nannie C. Willis L. Calhoon, of San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. ; Mrs. Louise (Calhoon) Chaplin, of Clarendon. 
Ark.; Mrs. Winnie (Calhoon) Green, of Jackson; Mrs. Sarah 
(Calhoon) Hall, of Holly Springs; George, Powell Calhoon, 
of Washington, D. C. and William McWillie. 




Cyrus Haiden Curd. 



CYRUS HAIDEN CURD, of Holly Springs, was bom 
April 12. 1873, at Cave City, Barren County. Kentucky, the 
son of Havilah Price Curd and wife, Letitia Young (Mosby) 
Curd. His paternal family has many branches well known 
in Kentucky and Virginia, all of which trace their lineage to 
Dr. Edward Curd, who came to Virginia from Edinburgh, 
Scotland, in the sixteenth century. Mr. Curd obtained his 
early education in Kentucky public schools, and also attended 
Liberty College at Glasgow, Ky.; was a member of the first 
class graduated from the Lexington (Miss.) Normal Col- 
lege. He taught eight years in the public schools of Missis- 
sippi, North Carolina and Tennessee. He then gave up the 
task of teaching to enter upon journalism and has now been 
a newspaper man for seven years, one year on the CoUier- 
ville Star and six years as editor and proprietor of the Holly 
Springs Reporter. He has always been active in educa- 
tional matters, is Secretary of the Board of Education of 
his town, and was largely instrumental in securing for Mar- 
shall County the Branch Experiment Station of the A. and 
M. College. Was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5. 1907. Mr. Curd is a Democrat, a member of 
the M. E. Church, South, is a Knight of Pythias and holds 
the position of Past Chancellor of his Lodge. He was mar- 
ried at Mt. Pleasant. Miss., August 27, 1895, to Rufie Ola 
Ivy, daughter of Jesse W. Ivy and wife, Margaret Walker 
Ivy. Mr. and Mrs Curd have one daughter, Haiden Dickey, 
and two sons, Havilah Price and Cyrus Hunter. 




William Henry King. 



WILLIAM HENRY KING, of Taska, was bom July 33. 
1877, at that place, tlie son of Edward King and wile, Rosa 
Bell (West) King. His paternal ancestors were Tennesscans; 
one of his great-grandfathers, Job Dean, was a soldier in the 
War of 1812; his father served through the Civil War as 
a Confederate soldier. Mr. King attended school at Taska 
and Mt. Pleasant, Miss., and at Collier\ille, Tenn., then 
entered a business college at Memphis, Tenn., where he was 
graduated. At the age of eighteen years he was employed 
at Bailey, Tenn., as a salesm.an and bookkeeper, and con- 
tinued in this position for seven years; since then he has 
carried on a general merchanflise business for himself. He 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. Mr. King is a Democrat, a member of the M. E. 
Church, South, a church trustee and officer of his Simday- 
school; also a member of the Farmers' Educational and Co- 
operative Union. He is not married. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1067 



MONROE COUNTY. 



THOMAS ROGERS CALDWELL, of Amory, was bom 
April 4, 1837. near Noonan. Ga.. the son of William Harris 
Caldwell and wife, Jane (Allen) Caldwell. Paternal ancestors 
came from Ireland; maternal from Scotland, both lines 
settled m Abbeville District, S. C; Mr. Caldwell's grand- 
father, William Caldwell, fought in the Revolutionary War. 
his father was Colonel of South Carolina militia for fifteen 
years. Mr. Caldwell attended the common schools of Car- 
rollton, Ga., in his youth; later he read law for a time in 
an office in Aberdeem Miss., but did not practice the profes- 
sion. He entered the Confederate Army as private in Coni- 
pany A, Sixteenth Alabama Regiment, later was transferred 
to the Twenty-sixth Alabama, with rank of First Lieutenant. 
He was with Bragg at Perry ville, with Jackson at Chancellors- 
ville, with Hood at Franklin and with Johnston on the retreat 
through Georgia. He was wounded six times during his 
four years of service. After the war he organized a patrol 
company, which did good service in keeping order in Mon- 
roe County during reconstruction times. Mr. Caldwell's 
occupation has always been that of farming. He was Jus- 
tice of the Peace in 1876-77, Supervisor in 1878-79, and 
Representative in the Legislature in 1892-94, and was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He 
is a Democrat, was on the County Executive Committee in 
1868-69; is a Methodist, and member of the Masonic Order. 
He was married near Smithville February 25, 1872, to Mary,. 
Jane Johnson, daughter of Israel Pickens Johnson and 
Julia Caroline (Thompson) Johnson, of Abbeville, S. C, 
whose family was of Irish descent. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell 
have five children: Julia Caroline (at home), Walter Harris 
Caldwell, of Smithville; Mrs. Bertie (Caldwell) Dil worth,' 
of Jasper, Ala.; Homer Franklin Caldwell, with U. S. Army 
in Cuba, and Thomas Young Caldwell, Amory. 




Thomas Rogers Caldwell. 



HENRY" FRANKLIN BROYLES, of Greenwood 
Springs, was bom November 4, 1865, at Hamilton, Monroe 
County, Miss., the son of Erasmus Seneca Broyles and wife, 
Fannie Abigail (Moore) Broyles. His father was a native 
of Tennessee. Dr. Broyles attended the com.mon schools of 
Hamilton in boyhood, entered the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College of Starkville in 1885, and pursued his studies 
for three years. He began the study of medicine at Van- 
derbilt University. Nashville, later went to Tulane Uni- 
versity, New Orleans, where he was graduated with degree 
of M. D. in 1S89. He began practice at Central Grove, 
is now practicing at Greenwood Springs. He was Health 
Officer for Monroe County for six years; ser\'ed in the State 
Senate for twelve years. 1892 to 1904, and was elected 
to the House of Representatives November s, 1907. Dr. 
Broyles is a Democrat, a Methodist, a Mason and member 
of the Kni.^ht'j of Pythias and of the Protective Order of 
Elks. He was married in 18S9 ot Hamilton to Laur-i 
Maude Booth, dau^rhter of Louis Dent Booth and Fannie 
Amanda Booth, of that place. Dr. and Mrs. Broyles have 
two living children: Frances Louise and Frank, Jr. 







Henry Franklin Broyles. 



1068 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



David Andrews Beeks. 




DAVID ANDREWS BEEKS, of Quincy. was bom 
March 21, 1845, in Laurens County, S. C, the son of Samuel 
Beeks and wife, Malinda Eddens (Andrews) Beeks. His 
paternal grandfather came from Scotland to Virginia just 
after the Revolutionary war, and in 1800 emigrated to 
South Carolina; his maternal great-grandfather, David 
Wright, had settled in the Palmetto State at a much earlier 
date, and fought in the colonial ranks. Mr. Beeks, who 
came to Mississippi with his parents when he was four years 
old, attended such common schools as e.^dsted in the rural 
districts of this State at that time. He left his studies in 
Jtily, 1861, to join the Confederate Army, enlisted first in 
Company I, Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment, and was 
honorably discharged in September; in December, i86j, 
again enrolled for sixty days and at the expiration of that 
time re-enlisted in the Sixteenth Confederate Cavalry 
(Armistead's Regiment) and served till the surrender. 
Mr. Beeks has always been a farmer. He was Justice 
of the Peace in 1873-74. Supervisor 1887-89. and was 
elected to the State Legislature in 1905 to fill an unex- 
pired term and was again elected November 5, 1907. He 
was a member of the Peoples' Party from 1892 till that 
party dissolved in 1900; is now a Democrat, a member of the 
Missionary !^aptist Church, of the Masonic Order, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Grange, Alliance and Farmers' 
Union. Mr. Beeks was twice married, first to Pemecie 
Rebecca Wade, daughter of Bumell R. and Martha 3. Wade, 
and second, October 15, 1895, to Mrs. Elizabeth Ann (Young) 
Sims, daughter of Arthur and Mary F. Young. By his first 
marriage he had six children: Mrs. Malinda I. (Beeks) Rye, 
of Rye; Mrs. Zula E. (Beeks) Puckett, of Gattman; Mrs. 
Mattie A. (Beeks) Joudon, of Quincy; Bumell E. Beeks, of 
Huntsville, Ala., and Mrs. Davie Anna (Beeks) Robinson, of 
Huntsville, Ala. 




Sidney Irving Robinson. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 
SIDNEY IRVING ROBINSON, of Winona, was bom 
March 7, 1869, the sop of Albert Beverly Robinson and 
Mar>' Jane (Thompson) Robinson. His paternal ancestors 
were of Scotch-Irish descent and first settled in Virginia: 
maternal were from North Carolina. His father served in 
the Fifth Mississippi Cavalry during the Civil War. Mr. 
Robinson was educated in the common schools of his county, 
also in a high school taught by the late Di. J. W. Armstrong; 
he did not take a college course. He taught school fronl 
the age of eighteen to that of twenty-six, and since then 
has followed the occupation of farming. He was Superin- 
tendent of Education in Montgomery County from 1896 to 
1904; was elected to the Legislature in July, 1904. to fill 
an unexpired term, and was re-elected November s, 1907; 
he has served on Senatorial and Congressional Committees 
in State Conventions. Mr. Robinson is a Democrat, a 
Baptist and member of the Masonic Order. He was mar- 
ried August 8, 1900, at Miner\^a, Miss., to Emma Townsend, 
daughter of Richard Townsend and wife, Virginia Townsend. 
His wife's paternal ancestors were from North Carolina, 
maternal from Tennessee. Mr. and .Mrs. Robinson have 
three children: Mary Ruth, Sidney Irving, Jr., and Richard 
Augustus. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

NESHOBA COUNTY. 

ANDREW DAVIS SHARPE, of Engine, was bom Feb- 
ruary I, 1884, in that village, the son of Reuben Franklin 
Sharpe and wife, Sarah Amanda (Jackson) Sharpe. His 
grandfather was a soldier in the Confederate Army and was 
killed at the siege of Vicksburg. Mr. Sharpe attended the 
rural and high schools of Neshoba County, became a student 
in the Macon and Andrews Business College, Meridian, 
graduating there in October, 1905. His occupations have 
been those of teaching and bookkeeping. He is a Demo- 
crat, a member of the Methodist Protestant Church, of the 
Masonic Order and of Woodmen of the World. Was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He 
was married November 18, 1906, at Neshoba to Lola Clare 
Whitaker, daughter of John William and Narcissa Ann 
Whitaker. Mr. and Mrs. Sharpe have two children, twin 
boys, Andrew Malvin and Henry Alvin, bom in October, 1907. 



1069 




Andrew Da\ is Sharpe. 



NEWTON COUNTY. 

MALCOMB PLEAS FOY, of Decatur, was bom March 6. 
1869, at Carsonville, Talbott Co., Ga., the son of Samson T. 
Foy and wife, Harriet A. (Hays) Foy. His paternal an- 
cestors were of Scotch-Irish stock; his grandfather came to 
America from Scotland before the Revolution and fought 
Tinder General Greene in his famous retreat across the Caro- 
linas and in the retreat was severely wounded in the knee; 
his maternal great-grandfather came to Georgia from 
England when a boy in colonial days. Mr. Foy was taught 
to read by his mother and only went to school during the 
stunmer months. In the fall of 1892. when twenty-three 
years old, he entered Dixon High School and there saw his 
first grammar and studied his first arithmetic. After two 
studious sessions in that school he taught tor a time in the 
public schools; subsequently he studied at the National 
Normal University, Lebanon, Ohio, then entered the Law 
School of Millsaps Clollege and took his degree in May, 1899; 
the same month he began the practice of law at Decatur, 
in which he is still engaged. He was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Foy is a Demo- 
crat and member of his County Executive Committee; 
belongs to the M. E. Church, South, the Knights of Pythias, 
Woodmen of the World and Masons. He married Annie B. 
Adams, daughter of Samuel M. Adams and ■wnte, M. Emma 
Adams; his wife's father was bom in South Carolina and 
fought in a Mississippi regiment in the Ci\-il War. Mr. and 
Mrs. Foy have one living child, Malcomb, Jr. 

JOHN DAVID CARR, of Newton, was bom on a farm 
near Stratton, Newton County, Mi.ss., the son of Cicero 
Anderson Carr and wife, Martha Ann (Duke) Carr. Paternal 
ancestors came from North Carolina. Mr. Carr's father 
enlisted in the Confederate sen.'ice April, 1863, in Company 
E, Seventh Mississippi Battalion, was wounded at Atlanta 
in July, 1864, paroled at Meridian in May, 1865. Mr. Can- 
attended the public schools of his county until 1S91, when he 
became a student at Conehatta Institute for sessions of 
1891-93; attended Lexington Normal College during 1895- 





1070 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



96, later entered the Law School of Millsaps College and 
took his degree in 1903. The same year he was admitted 
to the bar and began practice at Newton. He served as 
Town. Attorney in 1904; was elected Mayor of Newton for 
1905 and 1906. and re-elected for two years in 1907; was 
elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. 
Mr. Carr is a Democrat, is not a member of any church, but 
inclines toward the Primitive Baptist; is a member of the 
order of Woodmen of the World. He was married June 38, 
1896, to Edna Earl Pace, daughter of John G. Pace and 
wife, Nancy Pace, of Newton County. Mr. and Mrs. Can- 
have three living children: John Marshall, James Vardaman 
and Cecil Anderson. 

NOXUBEE COUNTY. 




Emmet D. Cavett. 




Iva Lamar Dorroh. 



EMMET DUVERGNE CAVETT, of Macon, was bom 
June^33,^ji84S, in Noxubee Cotmty, Miss., and is the son of 
James Richard Cavett and wife, Nancy (Conner) Cavett. 
His paternal ancestors came to America from Germany and 
settled in Pennsylvania; maternal came from Ireland and 
settled in North Carolina. The father of the subject of this 
sketch was a soldier of the Confederacy, and served in the 
Sixth Mississippi Cavalry; was Sheriff of Noxubee County 
and died in 1907 at the age of eighty-four. Mr. Cavett 
attended the primary schools of Noxubee County; entered 
Barton Academy of Mobile and pursued studies two years; 
enlisted as a private in Company A, Nineteenth Mississippi, 
at sixteen years of age in 1861, and served till 1863 in that 
regiment; covirier for Generals Featherston, Posey and A. P. 
Hill, Army of Northern Virginia, until 1864; Sergeant- 
Major Sixth Mississippi Cavalry until the surrender in April, 
1865. Mr. Cavett is the General Agent of the Union Central 
Life Insurance Company for the State of Mississippi; was 
Deputy U. S. Tax Collector under Cleveland; is a Demo- 
crat; was Chaim:ian of the Noxubee Executive Committee; 
was Grand Cyclops of the Noxubee Ku Klux Klan ; Captain 
of the Noxubee Red Shirt Boys in 1875*. is an elder in the 
Cvmiberland Presbyterian Chxirch; is a member of the 
Blnights of Pythias; was married October 10, 1865, to Sallie 
Eiigenia Spann, daughter of Col. R. R. Spann, of Pickens 
Coim^', Ala. Mrs. Cavett's ancestors came to Mississippi 
from South Carolina.. Mr. and Mrs. Cavett have four chil- 
dren: Mrs. Peter Weir, of Columbus, Miss.; Mrs. Alice Swanv^ 
of Deer Brook, Miss.; Will M. Cavett. of Jackson, Miss.; 
and Mrs. Dr. J. C. Robert, of Agricultural College, Miss. 
In the House of 1904-1908 Mr. Cavett was a member of the 
following committees: Penitentiary, Insurance and Military 
Affairs. He was re-elected to the House November 5, 1907. 

IVA LAMAR DORROH, of Macon, was bom April 11. 
1876, near Macon, Noxubee County, Miss., and is the son of 
Zachary Taylor Dorroh and his wife, Laura Frances (Mc- 
Donald) Dorroh. His paternal ancestors came from South 
Carolina to Alabama and thence to Mississippi in 1S32; the 
maternal line came originally from Scotland, first settling 
in South Carolina. The father of the subject of this sketch 
served in the State militia during the Civil War; was Sheriff 
of Noxubee Coxmty from 188S to 1896, at which date he was 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1071 



elected Chancery Clerk and has been twice re-elected. Mr. 
Dorroh attended the public schools of Noxubee County and 
later completed the course of the Macon Graded and High 
School; he entered Mississippi College at Clinton in 1895, 
but in 1897, at the close of his Junior year, left that institu- 
tion because of the yellow fever epidemic. The same year 
he was appointed Deputy Chancery Clerk of Noxubee 
County, which office he still holds; he is now reading law 
in expectation of taking up that profession; was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He is a 
Democrat, having several times acted as Secretary of the 
county organization; a Mason, an Odd Fellow, a member of 
the Protective Order o£ Elks, of the Improved Order of Red 
Men and a Knight of Pythias. Mr. Dorroh is unmarried. 



MICHAEL O'BYRNE, of Macon, was bom October 28, 
1853, at Carrick, County Donegal, Ireland, the son of Patrick 
O'Byme and wife, Catherine (McNelis) O'Byme. On his 
father's side he was descended from North of Ireland stock; 
on his mother's from the Scotch. In early youth Mr. O'Byme 
attended the schools of his county, but in common with all 
farmers* sons in Ireland in his time, had but slight opportu- 
nities for education. For twelve years after coming to the 
United States in 1873, he was a commercial traveler in the 
South; in 1888 he began farming in Noxubee County, and 
has been there ever since. Was elected to the House of 
Representatives November s. 1907. Mr. O'Byme is a 
Democrat and a lifelong member of the Catholic Church. 
He was married March 30, 1S86, at Cliftonville, Miss., to 
Ida Jane Neves, daughter of William Mastion Neves and 
wife, Elizabeth Neves, of that place. His wife is descended 
from Irish and Welch settlers in Alabama. Mr. "and Mrs. 
O'Byme have three children: Richard Francis, William 
Emmett and Michael Warren. 




Michael O'Byme. 



OKTIBBEHA COUNTY. 



NON OUINCY ADAMS, of Sturgis, was bom January 
22, 1839, in Rutherford County, N. C, the son of Azariah 
Adams and wife, Mary (Runyons) Adams. He was brought 
by his parents to Mississippi when an infant. He attended 
the rural schools in Choctaw and Oktibbeha Counties, but 
in that time educational opportunities in his locality were 
very limited. He entered the army as First Lieutenant in 
Company A, Twenty-seventh Mississippi Regiment, in iS6j. 
and served till the close of the war. He lost his left arm 
Jxily 28, 1864, at Atlanta. Mr. Adams' occupation has been 
that of a farmer and a minister, his church work having been 
done almost %s-holly in rural districts. In 1896 he served in 
the State Senate. He is a Democrat; has been a pastor in 
the Missionary Baptist Church since 1870, and has acted as 
Moderator at Association gatherings ten times; is also a 
member of the Masonic Order. He was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Adams h:is bfcn 
married three times: (i) December 32, 1857, to Catharine 
Griffith; (3) December ii, 1870, to Lois A valine Hannah, 
and (3) to Mary Delila Atkins, daughter of Messer Dobbs 



r^j 

.•*»■ ^*^ 







Non Quincy Adams. 



1072 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 






and wife, Marthy (Hughes) Dobbs. Of Mr. Adams' fifteen 
children twelve are living, as follows: Mrs. S. E. (Adanis) 
Hunt and Mrs. Virgie (Adams) Berry, both of Sturgis; Mrs. 
Emma (Adams) Walker, of Ranger, Tex.; Mrs. Tennie 
(Adams) Wilson, of Longview; Mrs. Mollie (Adams) Butler, 
of Cleveland, Tex.; Mrs. Anna (Adams) Mathews, of Cedar 
Bluff; Wm. A. Adams, of Van Alstyne, Tex.; Sam B. 
Adams, of Millport, Ala.; Non A. Adams, of Sturgis; Fan- 
cher. Walthall and Lillie Ann. 




John Henry Wellborn. 



JOHN HENRY WELLBORN, of Starkville, was bom 
May i8, 1863. at Monticello. Lawrence County, Miss., the 
son of James Williams Wellhom and wife, Elizabeth L. (Fox) 
Wellborn. His paternal ancestors were of English descent, 
and lived in North Carolina; they were a long-lived stock, 
his great-grandmother living to age of 104. grandmother to 
that of 96 years; on his mother's side the family came from 
North Carolina. Mr. Wellbom's father was one of the early 
Methodist preachers of South Mississippi and was Superin- 
tendent of Education in Lawrence County in the '70s. The 
subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of 
his county and at the Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
Starkville; he taught school in Mississippi two years, also 
taught one year in Texas; was owner and editor of the East 
Alississippi Times, of Starkville, two years; is now a real 
estate dealer and farmer. He was elected County Surveyor 
in 1899, also acted as Deputy Surveyor for three years, and 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. He is a Democrat, a Methodist, a Past Grand in the 
Odd Fellows lodge and a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and Knights and Ladies of Honor. Mr. Wellborn was mar- 
ried August 21, 1889, at Starkville, to Lucy M. Colclough, 
daughter of James Colclough and wife, Mary (Moss) Col- 
clough; his wife is a descendant of an old Virginia family, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wellborn have four children: Hilliard Col- 
clough, Annie Elizabeth, Lucy Virginia and Mary Moss. 




John Monroe Cox. 



PANOLA COUNTY. 

JOHN MONROE COX. of Batesville, was bom Sep- 
tember 16, 1848. in Panola County, the son of James Radford 
Cox and wife, Susan Ann (Garrett) Cox. Paternal ancestors 
came from England; maternal from Ireland; his father was 
Justice of the Peace both before and after the Civil War, in 
Panola County. Mr. Cox obtained his education entirely 
from the public schools of his own county and of Lafayette. 
From 1867 to 1873 was engaged in mercantile business in 
Batesville, also acted as telegraph operator during this time; 
was station a^ent at Batesville for the Mississippi & Tennessee 
Railroad from 1880 till that line was bou^^ht by the Illinois 
Central, then acted for the last-named road in the same 
position. Has now tor some years been in the lumber busi- 
ness. Mr. Cox has been Justice of the Peace for several 
terms, was Mayor of Batesville from 1896 to 1902; was 
elected to the special session of the Legislature in 1902. to 
fill a vacancy; was elected to the House of Representatives 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1073 



November s, igo?- He is a Democrat; acted with the Peo- 
ples' Party during its existence, but claims that he did not 
change his Democratic principles. He is a ruling elder in 
the Presbyterian Church, a member of the A. F. and A. M. 
and of the Knights of Honor. He was married December is, 
1874, to Mary Belle Lester, daughter of Dr. S. P. Lester and 
Emily Bowen Lester. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have five children: 
William John Cox, of Batesville; Lester Cox. of El Paso, 
Tex.; Mrs. Louise (Cox) Toombs, of Delhi, La.; Bowen and 
Leonard Kyle. 



WILLIAM EDWARD DAVIS. o£ Como. was -bom 
July la. 1872. at that place, the son of Isaac Newton Davis. 
J- . and wife, Sarah Shelton (White) Davis. His ancestors 
on tK.*h sides came from Georgia; his grandfather. Isaac N. 
Davis, Wc- a member of the Mississippi Senate, 1856-59, and 
carried throut,'^ the bill giving married women certain prop- 
erty rights; his maternal grandfather, Francis M. White, 
was one of the original builders of the Mississippi & Ten- 
nessee Railroad, and was its President till his death, in 1887. 
Issac N. Davis, Jr., was an officer on Gen. N. B. Forrest's 
staff in the Civil Vv^'ar. The subject of this sketch had his 
first -schooling at Corao, then attended an academy at Bell 
Buckle, Tenn., also attended the Christian Brothers' College 
at Memphis and the Memphis Military Institute. He has 
followed the occupation of farming at Como since 1899; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November s. 
1907. He is a Baptist, and holds the position of Protector 
in Como Lodge, Knights and Ladies of Honor. He was 
tnarried January 34, 1900. at Whitehaven, Tenn.. to Maggie 
Hale, daughter of James William Hale and his wife, Mattie 
(Deans) Hale. His wife's parents are old residents of North 
Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have three children: Wil- 
liam Edward. Martha Shelton and Francis Marion. 




William Edward Davis. 



LONNIE CHAMBLIN JOHNSON, of Reynolds, was 
bom December 28, 1874. at that place, the son of Elijah 
Jefferson Johnson and wife, Leacy (Westmoreland) Johnson. 
His paternal ancestors lived in Georgia; the maternal line 
came from England to Spartanburg, S. C, in 1750, where 
they received a grant of land from King George II.; this 
grant is still in the possession of the Westmoreland family. 
Mr. Johnson was reared on a farm; he attended the rurai 
school at internals until he was seventeen ye.ars old, when he 
was compelled to give his entire time to farm work. At the 
age of twenty-one he entered college at Tula, where he paid 
his expenses by teaching string music in the evenings. In 
September, 1897. he entered the high school at Lafayette 
Springs, where he also paid all e.xpenses by giving lessons 
on the violin. In the fall of 1899 be returned to Tula, where 
he finished the normal course the next year, then began 
teaching school, in which occupation he is still engaged. 
He has taught three years at Shady Grove and four at 
Mount Olivet. Mr. Johnson has pursued his college studies 
during his vacations, and in 1905 took the degree of M. A., 
at Hill's Business College, Waco, Tex.; in 1906. the degree 
of B. S. at the George Robinson Christian College at Hen- 




Lonnie Chamblin Johnson. 



1074 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



derson, Tenn.; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, a Baptist, and a 
member of the Woodmen of the World and the Brotherhood 
Knights of America. He is not married. 

PEARL RIVER TOUNTY. 
J. C. SHIVERS, of Poplarville. 




DavidTKenyard McDonald. 



PERRY COUNTY. 

DAVID KENYARD McDONALD. of New Augusta, 
was bom January 6, 1874, at Augusta, Miss., and is the son 
of Norman McDonald and wife, Mandy (Breeland) Mc- 
Donald. Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were 
Mississippians. Mr. McDonald was brought up on a farm 
and his educational opportunities did not come to him until 
he was on the verge of manhood. He entered school at 
Augusta in 1894, and in 1896 became a student at Washing- 
ton School, Greene County. In the fall of 1903 he was enrolled 
in the Law Department of Millsaps College, Jackson. He 
did not complete the course there, but read law outside, and 
entered upon the duties of his profession in the fall of 1904 
at New Richton, Miss. He is now practicing at New Augusta. 
Mr. McDonald is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist 
Church, a Mason, an Odd Fellow and Woodman of the World; 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. He was a member of the Democratic Executive Com- 
mittee from the fall of 1903 to 1907, but tendered his resig- 
nation upon entering the race for Representative. Mr. 
McDonald is unmarried. 




George Howard Alford. 



PIKE COUNTY. 

GEORGE HOWARD ALFORD. of Magnolia, was bom 
January 28, 1875, at Smithburg. Pike County, Miss., and is 
the son of J. Dock Alford and his wife, Luminda (Forten- 
berry) Alford. His paternal ancestors came from England 
to Massachusetts early in the eighteenth centtiry, thence to 
North Carolina, and in 1793 came to Mississippi. Mr. Alford 
attended the public schools of Pike County; subsequently 
entered the A. and M. College at Starkville, where he was 
graduated in 1899 with degree of B. S.; did not enter a 
professional school but chose farming as a life work, and has 
been very successful therein. He has devoted much time to 
advancing the interests of farmers, and was instrumental in 
having the subject of agriculture added to the public school 
curriculum; has assisted in holding many farmers' institutes, 
and has held important offices in farmers* organizations; 
was also chief editor of Southern Farm Gazette for two years. 
Mr. Alford has published two books: "How to Live a Happy 
Life," 190 pp.; and "Twenty-eight Industrial Addresses," 
316 pp. ; was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
ber s. 1907. He i.s a Democrat and a member of the Baptist 
Church; was married to .Mayme Indiana Simmons, daughter 
of Dr. William Fleet Simmons and wife, Annie (Hall) Sim- 
mons, of New Orleans. Mr. and Mrs. Alford have two 
children: Ruth and Mildred. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1075 



LUTHER WATSON FELDER. of McComb City, was 
bom May 4. 187 1, near Summit, Pike County, Miss., the son 
of John Smith Felder and wife, Juha (Huffman) Felder. 
His paternal ancestors came from Germany and settled in 
South Carolina; maternal, of Scotch-Irish extraction, set- 
tled in the Old Dominion; the great-grandfather of Mr. 
Felder was a soldier of the War of 1812; both his father and 
grandfather served in the ranks of the Confederate Army 
during the Civil War. Mr. Felder was educated in the 
public schools of Pike and Lincoln Counties; studied at 
Millsaps College, Jackson, graduating in 1901 with degree of 
A. B.; also entered upon a theological course at Vanderbilt 
University, but did not continue it; was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. His occupation has 
been that of a farmer since 1904; has held no public office 
till his late election to the Legislature. Mr. Felder is a 
Democrat, a member of the M. E. Church. South, and of the 
order of the Woodmen of the World. He is not married. 




Luther Watson Felder. 



PONTOTOC COUNTY. 



JOHN ISBELL LONGEST, of Troy, was bom April 24, 
i860, in Lee County, Miss., the son of Ruffin Longest and 
wife, Sarah Louis (Thompson) Longest. His paternal ances- 
tors came from Virginia; his great-grandfather, James Long- 
est, served in the Revolutionary War; the maternal line was 
Scotch-Irish, and settled in Alabama. Mr. Longest attended 
country schools assiduously in youth, a paternal order alwa3rs 
keeping him at his desk throughout the ten months' session : 
he entered luka Normal College and graduated in 1889, with 
degree of A. M. He taught school for ten years, then settled 
down to the life of a farmer in Pontotoc County. He served 
as member of the State Legislature in 1900-1902, and was 
again elected November 5, 1907; is a Democrat, a member 
of the Missionary Baptist Church and a Mason. Mr. Longest 
was married September 5, 1893, at Houlka. Miss., to Annie 
Leah Thompson, daughter of James Thomas Thompson and 
.wife, Carrie Thompson, of that place. His wife's family 
came from South Carolina. 



f .'. '^^•.■■^ 




John Isbell Longest. 



WILLIAM THOMAS STEGALL, of Plymouth, was 
born May 19, 1857, at Pontotoc, Miss., the son of James 
Morison Stegall and wife, Mary Jane (Griffin) Stegall. His 
paternal ancestors were Scotch-Irish, that came to this 
country in colonial days, settling in North Carolina, where 
several of them served with the forces of the colonists in the 
Revolutionary War. Mr. Stegall' s father came from North 
Carolina to Mississippi in 1835; he served in the Confederate 
Army with the Forty-first Mississippi Regiment. Mr. Stegall 
attended the common schools of Pontotoc County, also was 
a student in the Independent School taught in that county 
by Prof. George Perry. His occupation has always been 
that of farming. He was elected to the Legislatures of 1S96, 
1897, 1898 and 1906. Mr. Stegall is a Democrat, also a 
member of the Baptist Church; he is unmarried; he was 
elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. 




William Thomas Stegall. 



1076 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




John H. Gardner^ 




William Arthur White. 




x.^ 



Joe Boon Stone. 



PRENTISS COUNTY. 

JOHN HIGHTOWER GARDNER, of Booneville. was 
bom September 6, 1849, in Pike County, Ga., the son of 
Robert Bell Gardner and wife, Eugenia (Hightower) Gardner. 
Both lines of his ancestors were from Georgia; his grand- 
father was a member of the Georgia Legislature from 1844 
to 1854; his father served during the Civil War as Lieutenant 
in the Seventh Georgia Regiment, and surrendered with 
Johnston in South Carolina in 1865. His parents had moved 
to Mississippi in 1859, but returned to Georgia when the war 
opened, the father to enlist there, and the family to remain 
among friends till the close of hostilities. Mr. Gardner ob- 
tained his early education in the Georgia schools; later did 
not seek professional honors, but has been contented to be 
a farmer all his life. He has, however, never lacked interest 
in public affairs and has been President of the Board of 
Supervisors of Prentiss County and member of the Legisla- 
ture from this county in 1892-1894; was elected to the House 
of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Gardner is a 
Democrat, a Methodist, a Mason and Knight of Pythias. 
He was married December 15, 1870, to Maggie Bramlitt, 
daughter of Jesse L. Bramlitt and Mary Anderson Bramlitt, 
of Pulaski, Tenn. His wife's family were from Alabama and 
Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner have six children : Robert 
Bramlitt Gardner, of Memphis, Tenn. ; Gordon Lamar Gard- 
ner, also of Memphis; Mrs. Florence (Gardner) Richardson, 
of Washington, D. C; Lucille and Bramlitt Gardner, at 
home, and Mrs. Warrene (Gardner) Weeks, of Booneville. 

WILLIAM ARTHUR WHITE, of Dry Run, was bom 
December 3, 1869, at Bumsville, Miss., the son of James 
Francis White and wife, Nancy (Bamhill) White. His father 
was of English parentage, but came to this country when 
young and served in the Confederate Army from 1861 to 
1865; his mother was a native of Alabama. Mr. White 
received a common school education only, and has always 
followed the occupation of a farmer. He is a Democrat, and 
has been a member of the Executive Committee of his county 
since 1891; has been a licensed preacher in the Methodist 
Protestant Church since 1888, an elder since 1901, and was 
President of the North Mississippi Conference in 1903; was 
elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. 
He is also a member of the Masonic Order and of the Wood- 
men of the World. Mr. White was married June 17. 18S8. 
to Alice Rider, daughter of William Rider and wife. Mattie 
Rider, of Booneville. Mr. and Mrs. White have seven chil- 
dren: James, Kate, Willie, Robert, Vandiver, Bell and 
EarL 



QUITMAN COUNTY. 

JOE BOON STONE, of Belen. was bom October 39. 
187s. at Como, Panola County, Miss., the son of Samuel 
Callaway Stone and wife. Bettie Douglass (Partee) Stone. 
He obtained his early education in the public schools of his 
county and later took a four years' course at Searcy College, 
Arkansas. He secured his professional education at Vander- 
bilt University, where he took his degree of M. D. in 1901. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1077 



During the same year he commenced medical practice at 
Bclen, Quitman County, and is still thus engaged. Dr. Stone 
has been Superintendent of Education of Quitman County, 
1903-1907, and was elected to the House of Representatives 
November s, 1907. He is a Democrat, a member and steward 
of the Methodist Church; also belongs to the Masonic Order, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He is unmarried. 



RANKIN COUNTY. 

ALBERT GALLATIN NORRELL, of Plain, was bom 
.December 18, 1845, in Rankin County, Miss., the son of 
Thomas Norman Norrell and wife. Frances (Parker) 'Norrell. 
His paternal ancestors came from Ireland to South Carolina, 
settling first in the Edgefield district. The name was origi- 
nally O'Norrell. His maternal line came from England to 
the Jamestown (Va.) settlement among the first emigrants. 
His father was a man of note, a planter, a Confederate sol- 
dier, a member of the Board of Supervisors and of the Legis- 
latvure in 1880. Mr. Norrell attended Richland Academy 
in Rankin Covmty; entered the University of Mississippi, 
but did not graduate; went to Cumberland University, 
Lebanon, Tenn., to study law and took his Bachelor's degree 
in 1876. He practiced his profession in Yazoo Co\m.ty 
from 1877 to 1887, when he left Mississippi and went to 
Utah, taking up his residence in Salt Lake City. He was 
Mayor of Sartartia, Miss., and member of the Mississippi 
Legislature during the sessions of 1883, 1884 and 1886; 
after going West was Chairman of the Utah Commission, 
1895 and 1896; Judge of Third Judicial District, State of 
Utah, 1896-1900; and for ioxir years was Secretary of the 
Utah Democratic State Committee. He is a Democrat; 
a member of the M. E. Church, South, but has never belonged 
to any secret order except the Ku Klux Klan. He is not 
married. He was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. 




Albert Gallatin NorreU. 



WILLIAM DAVID HESLEP, of Pelahatchie, was bom 
May i8, 1858, at Trenton, Smith County, and is the son of 
William Henr>' Heslep and his wife, Sarah (Moore) Heslep. ■ 
His paternal ancestors came from Kentucky; his father was 
a pioneer physician, practicing medicine for more than 
forty years in Smith and adjoining counties. Mr. Heslep 
attended the common schools of his county, then took a 
course in Soule's Business College, in New Orleans, gradu- 
ating June 38, 1889. In January, 1890, he entered upon 
the occupation of bookkeeping at Pelahatchie; has held 
office as Justice of the Peace and ser\'ed as Mayor of Pela- 
hatchie for several years. Mr. Heslep is a Democrat; a 
Methodist. Mason and Knight of Pythias. Was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He was 
married December 15. iSSo, at Poikville, Miss., to Frances 
Emily Summer, daughter of Alfred Summer and J.ine 
(Boyd) Summer, of that place. Mr. Heslep has been 
tintiring in his efiorts to improve the schools of his vicinity. 




William Da%-id Heslep. 



1078 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Mr. and Mrs. Heslep have eight children: William Henry, 
of Jackson, Miss.; Daisy Pearl (Heslep) Russell, now of 
Bolton; Walter Tallie, JefiE David. Robert Moore, Joseph 
Summer, Ella Ruth and Alfred Sharpe. 



SCOTT COUNTY. 



f'';: 




Oliver Mcllhenny. 



OLIVER McILHENNY, of Forest, was bom Augvist 13. 
1861, at Wilmington, North Carolina, the son of Oliver Mc- 
llhenny and wife, Olivia (Smith) Mcllhenny. His paternal 
and maternal ancestors were Irish, his father having 'been 
bom in Donegal County, Ireland; now resides in Washington, 
D. C, Mr. Mcllhenny attended the schools of Tuskegee, Ala., 
in boyhood, obtained his collegiate education at the Univer- 
sity of Georgia and Cumberland University; entered the 
Law School of Lebanon, Tenn., taking his degree there in 
1890. He served as Mayor of Forest in 1903 and 1904, was 
a Presidential Elector in 1904, and member of the State 
Senate, session of 1906. In the Senate he was a member of 
the following committees: Finance, Re\'ision of Code of 
1906, Agriculture and Commerce and Immigration. Mr. 
Mcllhenny is a Presbyterian, a High Priest of the Royal 
Accepted Masons, and Senior Warden of his Lodge. He is 
not married. He -was elected to the House of Representa 
tives November s, 1907. 




Bitrleigh Goodman. 



SHARKEY COUNTY. 

BURLEIGH GOODMAN, of Cary, was bom October 73. 
184s, at Sunnyside, Cumberland Coimty, Va., the sen of 
Robert Joseph Goodman and wife, Frances Wilkerson (Dun- 
ham) Goodman. Both paternal and maternal ancestors were 
Virginians. The subject of this sketch obtained his early 
education in the common schools of Cumberland and Amelia 
Counties, Virginia. In 1863 he enlisted in Company G, Third 
Virginia Cavalry, Wickham's Brigade, Fitzhugh Lee's Divi- 
sion, Army of Northern Virginia, and served the last eighteen 
months of the war. When peaceful conditions had been 
established he entered the University of Virginia, gradu- 
ating therefrom in i868 with degree of M. D. In 1869 Dr. 
Goodman was employed in Baltimore Medical College, in 
college and hospital work; he came to Mississippi in 1873, 
and practiced until 1894. He served on the Board of Super- 
visors of his county from 1900 to 1904; has also been on 
senatorial and county executive committees for several terms. 
Was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. Dr. Goodman is a Democrat, a Methodist, also a 
Senior Warden of the Masonic Order, and an Odd Fellow. 
He has been twice married,- his second wife was Lottie 
Ohleyer, daughter of John Ohleyer and wife, Sophie Reixel 
Ohleyer, of Brandon. Miss. Her parents emigrated from 
Alsace-Lorraine, John Ohleyer having served under Napoleon 
III in the Franco-Prussian War. Dr. and Mrs. Goodman 
have four children: H. S. Goodman, M. D., of Car>'. Miss.; 
William Ivey Goodman, of Cumberland, Va., by the first 
marriage, and Robbie O. and Rexel Goodman by the last. 



tm: 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1079 



SIMPSON COUNTY. 

WILLIAM MILFORD LOFTON, of Mendenhall, was 
bom August 28, 1871, at Polkville, Smith County, Miss., 
and Is the son of William Lofton and his wife, Nancy (Davis) 
Lofton. Both paternal and maternal ancestors came from 
England and settled in South Carolina at an early day. Mr. 
Lofton attended the public schools of his county in boy- 
hood, also studied at the Raleigh High School, when this 
institution was under the supervision of Professor F. A. 
Hattoa; he did not attend college, but entered the Law 
Department of the University of Mississippi, taking his 
Bachelor's degree June 9, 1897; less than a month later he 
opened a law office at Raleigh, practicing there and at 
Westville until 1900, when he took up his residence at 
Mendenhall; was elected Mayor of that city in 1904. serving 
two terms; in January, 1907, was elected County Attorney 
for Simpson County; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Lofton is a Democrat, 
and has served on the Democratic Executive Committee. 
He was married at Westville March 37, 1900, to Emma 
Durr, the daughter of Emanuel Durr and wife, Emma 
Durr. Mr. and Mrs. Lofton have two children, Milford 
and Lola May. 




W. Milford Lofton. 



SMITH COUNTY. 

EDGAR GAYLE ROBINSON, of Raleigh, was bom 
September 11, 1868, in Smith County, Miss., the son of 
George Robinson and wife. Malicia (Crook) Robinson. His 
father was a native of Alabama, his mother of Mississippi; 
his father served four years as a Confederate soldier. Mr. 
Robinson was educated in the common schools of his county 
and at Sylvania High School; did not receive a college 
education, but later in life took the Millsaps law course, 
receiving his degree in 1897. He has practiced his profession 
at Raleigh since that date. He is a Democrat; served on 
the Executive Committee from the county at large from 
1899 to 1903; is a Baptist, a Past Master of the Masonic 
Order, a Commander of Woodmen of the World and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Robinson was married 
at Raleigh to Floyd Jones, daughter of William Hinds Jones 
and wife, Sallie A. Jones. His wife's father was in the State 
Legislature in 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have three 
children: Sallie. Frank and May. He was elected to the 
House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Robinson 
died December 15. 1907. before the session of the Legisla- 
ture. 

JOSEPH JAMES TERRY, of Daniel, was bom April 27. 
1 86 1, at Trenton, Smith Coimty. Miss., and is the son of 
Louis Saxon and Lula (Griffith) Terry. His paternal 
ancestors were from Kentucky, maternal from Georgia. 
Mr. Terry was educated in the public schools of Smith 
County, and has been engaged in farming all liis life near 
the place of his birth. He was elected to the House of 
Representatives at a special election held January 35, 1908, 
to succeed E. G. Robinson, deceased. He is a Democrat; 
member of the Baptist Church; Mason and Master of Willis 




Edgar G. Robinson. 




! . 



Joseph James Terry. 



1080 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Lodge, No. 92, and member and President of the Smith 
County Farmer's Union. Mr. Terry was married in Rankin 
County in 1883 to Belle Wallace, daughter of Wesley and 
Mary Wallace. Mr. and Mrs. Terry have seven children: 
John, Thomas, James. Minnie, Bessie, May and Walter. 




Charles Pinkney Adair. 




Herbert Holmes 



SUNFLOWER COUNTY. 

CHARLES PINKNEY ADAIR, of Indianola, was bom 
February i, 1858, at Clarksburg, Yolo County, Cal., the son 
oi William Horry Adair and wife, Elizabeth Frances (Ross) 
Adair. His paternal great-grandfather was a soldier of the 
Revolution and passed unharmed through the perils of war, 
but later was killed by a band of Tories; his father was a 
native of Alabama; spent tvvelve years in California when 
a young man, then came to Mississippi; entered the Con- 
federate Amny as Captain of Company E, Fourth Mississippi 
Regiment, and was killed at the siege of Vicksburg. Mr. 
Adair attended the public school in boyhood, later was a 
student in Professor W. H. Johnson's High School at Winona; 
spent a year at Mississippi College, Clinton, then went to 
the University of Mississippi at Oxford, taking a degree 
from the Law Department in 1881; the same year began 
practice at Johnsonville. He has had various employment 
as lawyer, druggist, journalist, remaining in this last voca- 
tion a number of years, but has now for some time ranked 
himself as a plain farmer, though residing in town. He has 
served two terms as Mayor of Indianola, 1899-1901, and 
1904-05; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November s. 1907 i is a Democrat, a Presbyterian and a 
Mason; is now a member of the Judicial Executive Commit- 
tee of his district. Mr. Adair was manned September 11, 
t888, at Vaiden, Miss., to Julia Eldredge Colmery, daughter 
of Daniel Webster and Mary Eldredge (Lacy) Colmery, of 
Eldorado. Ark. 

TATE COUNTY. 

HERBERT HOLMES, of Senatobia, was bom Septem- 
ber 30, 1878, at Plum Point, DeSoto County, Miss., the son 
of Francis Holmes and his wife. Lizzie Kelly (Clarke) Holmes. 
His paternal ancestors came from Ireland to South Carolina; 
his grandfather emigrating to Mississippi in 1836; he was 
a soldier of the United States Army in the Seminole War in 
Florida. The father of the subject of this sketch served as 
a Confederate soldier through the war in Walthall's Brigade, 
rising to the rank of Captain; he was a prisoner in Fort 
Delaware a year and a half. Mr. Holmes attended the public 
schools of DeSoto County; entered luka Normal Institute 
in 1895. taking a B. S. course, also received a diploma 
from Nelson's Business College; entered the Law School of 
the University of Mississippi and was graduated in June. 
1904, with degree of Bachelor of Laws. During the same 
year he began practice at Senatobia, where he has been 
engaged ever since. The Supreme Court records show that 
he has been counsel in important litigation before that.tg|i|pi^^= 
he has always taken p.irt in every movement for the good of 
his home town and county. Mr. Holmes is a Democrat; 
member of the M. E. Church, South and a Knight of Pythias. 
He is not married. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 



1081 



WALKER WOOD, of Senatobia. was bom April 23. 1874. 
at Vicksburg, Miss., the son of Williatii Menefee Wood 
and wife, Josephine (Kendrick) Wood. His paternal 
ancestors were Virginians of English descent. His grand- 
father. John Walker Wood, was educated at Transylvania 
University, Ky., practiced law in Paris, Ky., also in Lexing- 
ton and Kosciusko, Miss., and was a member of the Missis- 
sippi Secession Convention from Attala County. Mr. Wood 
was educated in the public schools of his vicinity; began 
journalistic work at the age of eighteen and has continued in 
that line ever since. He assumed charge of the Oxford 
(Miss.) Eagle in 1892, conducting that journal until 1899, 
then purchased the Senatobia Democrat of which he is now 
editor and proprietor. He was elected to the Hoxise of 
Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. Wood is a Demo- 
3rat, a Methodist and member of the Masonic Order, also of 
the Woodmen of the World and Knights and Ladies of 
Honor. He has always been, through his paper, a warm 
advocate of all measures tending to the betterment of his 
town, county and State. In 1903 Tate County adopted the 
contract system of working public roads, after a spirited 
contest in which Mr. Wood led, and the advantage of the 
change is seen in the county's improved highways. He was 
married February 19, 1902, to Susie Garrott Mcacham, 
daughter of Robert G. Meacham and Charity Olivia (Garrott) 
Meacham, of Senatobia. Mr. and Mrs. Wood have two 
living children, Olivia Elizabeth and George Meacham. 



TALLAHATCHIE COUNTY. 

JOHN NATHAN SULLIVANT. of Teasdale, was bom 
October 7, 1883, at that place, the son of Jesse Sullivant and 
wife. Sallie Blakey (Patterson) Sullivant. His paterral 
ancestors were Scotch-Irish; first settled in North Carolina: 
maternal were Scotch, early settlers of Alabama. Mr. 
Sullivant's father was a native of Tallahatchie County; he 
enlisted in the Confederate Army -in the spring of 1861 and 
served until the surrender in Walthall's Brigade. The sub- 
ject of this sketch attended the rural schools of his \-icinity 
to get the rudiments of education; studied the higher 
branches at Millsaps College, Jackson. His occupation is 
that of general farming and merchandising. He was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Sulli\'ant is a Democrat and a Methodist. He was. married 
at Enid in the latter part of October, 1 904. to Annette Buntin . 
daughter of William Wiley Buntin and wife, Anna Buntin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sullivant have one child, a little girl. 



TIPPAH COUNTY. 

SIDNEY OVID LOVE, of Ripley, was born February 6. 
1849, at Kilmichael. Choctaw County, Miss., and is the son 
of Dr. Friend Ovid Love and his wife. Mary Elizabeth 
(Lipscomb) Love, His paternal ancestors came from Ire- 
land to South Carolina before the Rev<.)lutionary War; his 
maternal progenitors came from Scotland to the same colony 
and both lines are known to have taken part in the colonists' 
struggle for liberty. Mr. Love had but slight opj^Kjrtunity 




Walker Wood. 




John N. Sullivant. 







Sidney Ovid Love. 



1082 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



for education in boyhood, but attended the Masonic Military 
Institute at Carrollton in 1861-63, then under the princi- 
palship of Rev. Henry Ray. In 1863 he enHsted in Com- 
pany C, Twentieth Mississippi Infantry, C. S. A., and served 
with the Army of Tennessee until the surrender at Greens- 
boro, N. C, in 1865. He studied and read much at home 
and pursued the occupation of teaching in country schools 
from 1876 to 1887. He then adopted the business of 
farming, in which he is still engaged. He held office as 
Justice of the Peace in his county for two terms ; was mem- 
ber of the Legislature in the session of 1888; was Circuit 
Clerk of Tippah County from 1896 to 1900; was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Love is a Democrat, and a member and ordained preacher 
of the Methodist Protestant Church. He was married July 
31, 1876, at Ruckersville to Lenora Elizabeth Braddock, 
daughter of John Marion Braddock and wife, Jane (Rid- 
dlesperger) Braddock. His wife is of a South Carolinian 
family whose ancestors came from Holland in the eighteenth 
century. Mr. and Mrs. Love have eight children: George 
Byron, of Greenville, Texas; Mar>' Elizabeth (Love) Glissen, 
of Ripley; Harriet Ann (Love) Meeks, of New Albany; 
Friend Ovid, of Ripley; Emma Chase, Lenora Jane, Sidney 
Tatxmi and Walter McLaurin. 




Mackdonel Adams. 




Charles Wiley Doherty. 



TISHOMINGO COUNTY. 

MACKDONEL ADAMS, of luka, was bom April 15, 
1845, in Pitt County, North Carolina, the son of Bryant 
Adams and Susan (Stokes) Adams. Both paternal and 
maternal ancestors were from Virginia. Mr. Adams was 
enlisted as a private in Company B, Ck)lonel Morland's Regi- 
ment, Rhody's command, in the Confederate Army. Three 
years after the war he received his first education in a coun- 
try school. He made s^uch good use of his limited opportuni- 
ties that he was able to begin teaching the first year that the 
free school system was in operation, and taught nine years; 
since then he has been occupied in farming; was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Adams is a Democrat, a member of the Methodist Protestant 
Church and of the Farmers' Education and Co-operative 
Union. He was married April 4, 1876. near luka, to Drucilia 
'Adeline Hubbard, daughter of Lemuel Jackson Hubbard 
and wife, Susan Hubbard. Mr. and Mrs. Adams have 
three children: Paul Raymond, Ollie Everet and Grace 
Ertell. 

TUNICA COUNTY. 

CHARLES WILEY DOHERTY. of Tunica, was bom 
January 5, 1857, at Jackson, Miss., and is the son of Paul 
Manson Doherty and wife, Mary O' Sullivan. His ancestors 
came to Mississippi from Ireland. Mr. Doherty attended 
the public schools of Jackson, Miss.; is a cotton planter; 
elected to the House of Representatives from Tunica County 
November 3, 1903. Mr. Doherty is a Democrat; member of 
the Catholic Church; Knight of Pythias; was married 
March 17. 1883, at Memphis, Tenn.. to Meta Mclva WTiite, 
daughter of William W. White and wife, Ann Pegues. Mrs. 
Doherty's ancestors came from Georgia and South Carolina. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1083 



Mr. and Mrs. Doherty have two children : Annelle Longstreet 
and Clark White. In the House of 1904-1908 Mr. Doherty 
was a member of the following committees: Ways and Means, 
Levees (Ch.). Penitentiary. He was re-elected to the House 
November s, 1907. 

UNION COUNTY. 

GASTON LILLY JONES, of New Albany, was bom 
April 12, i860, at Birmingham (then) Pontotoc County, 
Miss., and is the son of Atlas Jones and wife, Mary Frances 
(Cheairs) Jones. His paternal ancestors came to Mississippi 
from North Carolina; maternal from Tennessee. Mr. Jones 
was educated in the public schools of Union and Lee Coun- 
ties, and at the Johnson Institute at Booneville, Miss.; he 
read law in the office of Judge B. B. Boone, of Booneville, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1887 ; located at New Albany, 
Miss., for practice in April, 1888. He was the County Super- 
intendent of Education in Union Covmty January i, 1890, to 
Janvtary i, 1896; was member of the Legislature, 1896-1900. 
and member of the State Senate, 1900-1904. Mr. Jones is 
a Democrat, Methodist, Pythian, Odd Fellow, and serves as 
recording steward of his church. When in the Legislature 
Mr. Jones was the author of the amendment to Section 206 
of the State Constitution, causing a more equitable distribu- 
tion, of the school fund, and also amended the laws of descent 
so that grandchildren could inherit exempt property from 
their grandparents; was elected to the House of Representa- 
tives November 5, 1907. Mr. Jones was married Novem- 
ber 7, 1897, to Esther Patterson, daughter of Jasper and 
Catharine Patterson, of New Albany. They have one living 
child, a daughter, Mary Louise Jones. Mr. Jones was a 
candidate for Speaker and received over twenty votes on 
the first ballot. Upon his withdrawal Hon. H. M. Street 
was elected. 

ANDREW JACKSON JONES, of Myrtle, was bom 
June IS, 1864, at Fredonia, Pontotoc County (now Union), 
Miss., and is the son of Andrew Jackson Jones and Mary 
(Dorsey) Jones. His father was a soldier of the Confederacy 
and held the rank of Captain. Mr. Jones received his 
primary education in the common schools. He is a farmer, 
and served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of 
Union County from 1900 to 1908; is a Democrat and a 
minister of the Baptist Church; he is a Mason and Woodman 
of the World. Mr. Jones was married July 24. 1890. to 
H'ulett Harrison Ferguson, daughter of Sam and Martha 
Ferguson, of Gallway, Miss. Mr. and Mrs, Jones have four 
children: Levis, Clyde Fant, Annie Dorsey and A. J. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

THOMAS ROBBIN FOSTER, of Vicksburg. was born 
March 20, 185?. at Mobile, and is the son of Hillary Foster 
and Lucy (Meacham) Foster. His ancestors came to America 
from England and Scotland and settled in Massachusetts 
and Virginia. (See Pierce's History of the Fosters of Amer- 
ica.) Samuel Glen, a maternal ancestor, was a Captain in 
the Army of the Revolution. The subject of this sketch is a 
descendant of Ancher Great Forester of Flanders, who died 




Gaston Lilly Jones. 




Andrew Jackson Jones. 




Thomas Robbin Foster. 



1084 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



in 837, and is a descendant of Sir John Foster, who was one 
of those who compelled Kink' John to sign the Ma«na Charta 
in 1 2 15. He died in 1220. Mr. Foster's father was President 
of the Mobile Bank and Mobile & Ohio R. R., and was a mem- 
ber of the mercantile firm of Boy kin. McRae & Foster. Mr. 
Foster attended the schools of Mobile and Warrenton. N. C, 
He is a lawyer, and has been in active practice of law in 
Vicksburg since 1880; elected Justice of the Peace in 1884J 
was Mayt)r of the town of Speeds Addition from 1892 to 
1902, when he resigned; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives from Warren County in 1902; re-elected in 1903 
and 1907. Mr. Foster is a Democrat; member of the Episco- 
pal Church and Elks; was married November 29, 1882, at 
Vicksburg, Miss., to Mary Sophia Moore, daughter of Henry 
Tierman Moore and wife, Harriet Ann Moore, of Vicksburg, 
Miss. Mrs. Foster's father is said to have taught the first 
public school in Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Foster have one 
liv-ing child, Mar>-Corinne; have three dead : Hillary, Thomas 
Robbins and Henry Moore. In the House of 1904- 1908 
Mr. Foster was a member of the following committees : Ways 
and Means, Local and Private Legislation, Corporations, 
Insurance and Public Lands (Ch.) 




George Robert Hawkins. 



% 



% ^/ i; 



■^^-.^>^ 



Joseph Horace Nelms. 



GEORGE ROBERT HAWKINS, of Vicksburg. was 
bom April 28, 1849. in Warren County, Miss., the son of. 
George Hawkins and wife, Eliza (Willson) Hawkins. Pater- 
nal ancestors came to America from Ireland, maternal from 
Scotland, in the early years of the nineteenth century. He 
obtained his education solely from the public schools in his 
Wcinity, and did not enter college. He has always followed 
the occupation of farmer and cotton planter; was selected 
by the British Cotton Growing Association, of Manchester, 
England, as cotton expert, to go to West Africa to teach the 
English and natives how to raise and treat cotton, and spent 
two years there. Mr. Hawkins was brought up in the Epis- 
copal Church; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He was married at Natchez January 28. 
187 1, to Mary Agnes Adams, daughter of Thomas Jefiferson 
and Charlotte Donahoe Adams, of Church Hill. By this 
marriage he had five children: Mrs. Sallie M. (Hawkins) 
Oates, Henry Downs Hawkins, William Mercer Hawkins, 
Harrald Herbert Hawkins and Mrs. Agnes (Hawkins) Har- 
vey, all residents of Vicksburg. Mrs. Mary Agnes Hawkins 
died in 1883, and Mr. Hawkins was married a second time, 
to Lotta Child, daughter of Henry and .'\ngelina Child; by 
this union he has one child, Evangeline Henri. 

J. J. O'NEILL, of Vicksburg. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 
JOSEPH HORACE NELMS. of Greenville, was bom 
June 28, 1848, in Chickasaw County, near Houston, Miss., 
and is the son of John Calhoun Nelms and his wife. Agnes 
(Goode) Nelms. He was at an early age separated from his 
parents, and family records having been destroyed during 
the Civil War, he has^bt-en \mable to ascertain the nativity 
of his ancestors. In boyhood he attended school at Houston, 
Miss., where his instructor was Rev. Mr. Caruthers, an old 
school Presbyterian preacher. In May, 1863, being then 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1085 



scarcely sixteen years old, he enlisted in Company G, Eighth 
Mississippi Cavalry, and served with his command until it 
surrendered, in April, 1865, at Gainesville, Ala. On returning 
to peaceful life, he attended school at Marshall, Tex., in 1866 
and 1867, then taught school for one year, after which he 
entered mercantile pursuits, in which he has ever since been 
more or less engaged. He served as Deputy Sheriff of 
Navarro County, Tex., in 1870, and held the same ofhce in 
Panola County, Miss., from 1886 to 1889. Mr. Nelms is a 
Democrat, a member of the Episcopal Church since 1874. a 
Sunday-school Superintendent for eighteen years, and an 
officer of Greenville Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks; was elected to the House of Representatives Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. He was married April 39, 1873, to Lillian Lee 
Hudson, daughter of Alfred Hudson and his wife, Narcissa 
(Kirkwood) Hudson, of Panola County. His wife's father 
served two years in the Mexican War, and in the Civil War 
commanded Hudson's Battery until the Battle of Shiloh. 
where he was killed. 

VAN BUREN BODDIE, of Greenville, was bom Janu- 
ary 20, 1869, at Memphis, Tenn., the son of Van Buren 
Boddie and wife, Anna (Jewell) Boddie. Mr. Boddie ob- 
tained his early education in the common schools of his 
vicinity, did not enter college, but read law in the office of 
Messrs. "Yager and Percy, in Greenville; he was admitted to 
the bar in 1893, opening practice in that city. He was a 
member of the Legislature during the sessions of 1902 and 
1906, filling the unexpired term of F. E. Larkin in the first- 
named year and that of Percy Bell in the second; was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5. i907- Mr. 
Boddie is a Democrat, an Episcopalian, a Mason and member 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He was 
married March 13, 1895, at Greenville, to Fay Shields, 
daughter of John W. Shields and wife, Sallie (Walton) 
Shields, of Oxford, Miss. In the House of 1906 Mr. Boddie 
•was a member of the following committees : Judiciary, Levee 
and Penitentiary, and is the author of the anti- future- 
gambling bill. 







Van Buren Boddie. 



NEADOM WALTER SUMRALL. of Belzoni. was bom 
February i, 1875, at Gallman, Copiah County, Miss., the son 
of Joseph Sumrall and wife, Levicy Elizabeth (Wilson) Sum- 
rail. His father served four years in the Confederate Army 
vmder Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Mr. Sumrall attended the 
public schools of Copiah County and the high school at 
Gallman; entered Mississippi Normal College at Houston, 
where he was graduated in 1899 with B. S. degree. After 
this he taught school in Copiah County for nearly eight 
years, then took a special course at Mississippi College, 
Clinton, in English, Latin and Philosophy; entered the Law 
School of Millsaps College, taking his degree in 1905. He 
was admitted to the bar and located for practice at Belzoni. 
in June, 1905. where he has been ever since; was elected to 
the House of Representatives November s, iqo7. He has 
served as member of the Teachers' Examining Board of Lis 
county. He is a Democrat, member of the Baptist Church 
and Knights of Pythias. Mr. Sumrall was married Decem- 
ber 17, 1907. at Belzoni, to Lena Lee Jackson. 




Neadom Walter Sumrall. 



1086 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




Ernest William Stewart. 



WAYNE COUNTY. 

ERNEST WILLIAM STEWART, of Waynesburg. was 
bom October 4, 1862, at Vaidcn, Carroll County, Miss., the 
son of William Stewart and wife, Mary (Pleasants) Stewart. 
His paternal line was of Scotch-Irish descent, and lived in 
Ohio until his father came south when a young man, took a 
medical course in New Orleans, and began practice as a 
physician at Vaiden, Miss.; he opposed the idea of secession, 
but when Mississippi went out of the Union, he was among 
the first to take up anns in her defense ; and went to the field 
as a Lieutenant in Armstrong's Brigade, remaining in the 
service until his death in 1863. Mr. Stewart's maternal 
grandfather was a native Mississippian, a soldier in the 
Mexican War, and a Major in the Confederate Army. The 
subject of this sketch attended common schools in this 
State and in Sandwich, 111., and obtained higher education 
. at Jennings Seminary, Aurora, 111. He studied law at Cum- 
berland University, Lebanon, Tenn., taking his degree there 
in January, 1885; he has practiced at Vaiden, at McCorab 
City, and for the last five years at Waynesboro. Mr. Stewart 
holds the position of City Attorney for the town of Waynes- 
boro, and has been County Attorney also for four years, and 
was elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 
1907. He is a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church, 
an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias and Woodman of the 
World. He was married December 19, 1895, at McComb 
City, to Sophia M. Kepper, daughter of Lotiis and Frances 
Kepper, of that place. 



"?■ 



4," 




Troy Rufus Langstc 




William Johnson Stockett. 



WEBSTER COUNTY. 

TROY RUFUS LANGSTON, of Walthall, was bom 
September ii, 1855, near Raleigh, N. C, the son of Elias 
Langston and wife, Sarah (Lewis) Langston. He was edu- 
cated in the rural schools of North Carolina; left that State 
in 1879, and for several years was a railroad contractor. He 
has been a resident of Mississippi now for eighteen years. 
He is the present Mayor of Walthall, and for two years has- 
been editor and proprietor of the Walthall Warden. He was 
elected to the House of Representatives November $, 1907. 
Mr. Langston is a Democrat, a Baptist, and a member of tlie 
Woodmen of the World. He was married near Mathiston, 
Miss., June 5, 1889, to Ola Holland, daughter of Henry 
Harrison Holland and wife, Mary Holland, of that locality. 
Mr. and Mrs. Langston have no children. 



WILKINSON COUNTY. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON STOCKETT, of Woodville, was 
bom February 14, 186S, in Wilkinson Countv, Miss., the son 
of Peter M. Stockett and wife, Juliet (Johnson) Stockett. 
His paternal ancestors came from Mar>-land, maternal from 
Virginia; both families were of English descent; his father 
was a Confederate soldier of Company K, Sixteenth Missis- 
sippi Regiment, and was the regiment's color-bearer; was 
also a Presb^-tcrian Elder, and twice a Commissioner to the 
Presbyterian General ^^sembly of the United States. Mr. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Stockett attended the schools of Wilkinson Gaunty in early 
youth; obtained his higher education at the Chamberlain- 
Hunt Academy, Port Gibson, and at the University of Mis- 
sissippi; he was graduated from the last-named institution in 
1889 with degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to 
the bar in Woodville, Miss., in January, 1890, and since that 
date has been engaged in the practice of law in that city; was 
elected to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907- 
He is a Democrat and a member and elder in the Presby- 
terian Church. , 

SIDNEY ROSS JONES, of Centerville, was bom May i. 
1875, at Baton Rouge, La., the son of Henry Jones and wife, 
Winifred (Pipes) Jones. Both his father and grandfather on 
the father's side were born in Erie Cotmty, N. Y.; his ma- 
ternal ancestors came from Scotland to North Carolina, and 
thence to Louisiana. His father served four years in the 
Confederate Army. Mr. Jones attended the public schools 
of New Orleans; did not receive a college education. He 
came to Wilkinson County, Miss., in 1891, later, learned the 
life insurance business in an office, and in 1904 started out 
for himself in that line; was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5. 1907. He is a Democrat and an 
Episcopalian, but has no secret society affiliations. He was 
married January a, 1900. to Olive Bramlette, daughter of 
D. C. Bramlette and Olivia Ratcliffe, of Woodville, Miss.;, 
married second time December 29, 1903, to Lizzie Anderson, 
daughter of Thaddeus N. L. Anderson and wife, Laura <Lusk) 
Anderson, of Centerville, Miss. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have 
two children: Olive Bramlette, by first marriage, and Wind- 
sor, by second marriage. 



WINSTON COUNTY. 

OAKLEY ADAJR BENNETT, of Louisville, was bom 
June 24, 1885, at Louisville, Winston County, Miss., and is 
the son of John Oscar Bennett and Lillian (Oakley) Bennett. 
His ancestors emigrated to Mississippi from South Carolina 
and Kentucky, and some member of the family has been a 
soldier in every foreign war in which the United States has 
been engaged. Mr. Bennett received his primary education 
in the schools of Louisville. Miss., and afterwards continued 
his studies at the Mississippi A. and M. College, United States 
Naval Academy and Cumberland University. He has been 
a Midshipman in the United States Navy, and holds the rank 
of First Lieutenant in the Mississippi National Guard. He 
is a Democrat; member of the Presbyterian Church and 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. During his student days 
Mr. Bennett was on the board of editors of the college paper 
and editor of the University Annual. He is unmarried. 



YALOBUSHA COUNTY. 

JESSE ROWE COLEMAN, of Water VaUey. was b.^rn 
September 15, 1847, at Eutaw, Greene Covmty, Ala., tlie son 
of John Greene Coleman and wife, Mary Elizabeth (Coleman) 
Coleman. His grandparents came from Wal^s to South 
Carolina, and thence to Alabama. Mr, Coleman attended 



1087 



.—-5^ 
?^^^^^^ 




^^M 



Sidney Ross Jones. 




Oakley Adair Bennett. 




Jesse Rowe Coleman. 



1088 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 




John Lynn Harris. 



the country schools of Yalobusha County, served in the 
ranks of the Confederate Army when a mere lad. and had no 
opportunity for a college education. His occupation has 
always been that of a tiller of the soil, and his life has been 
quite devoid of incident. He is a Jeffersonian Democrat, a 
Universalist and member of the Masonic Order and of the 
Farmers' Union. He was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives November 5, 1907. He married, November i, 
1876, Emma Laura Stevens, daughter of Silas P. Stevens 
and wife, Rhoda (Morgan) Stevens, of Columbus, Ga. Mr. 
and Mrs. Coleman have two children : J. G. Coleman, of Water 
Valley, and Mrs. Eula Lee (Coleman) Gordon, of Tuscumbia, 
Ala. 

JOHN LYNN HARRIS, of Water Valley, was bom 
February 2, 1878, at Hemingway, Carroll County, Miss. 
He is the son of Willis Benjamin Harris and wife. Emma 
Lynn (Thompson) Harris. Mr. W. B. Harris was a native 
of North Carolina and came to Montgomery County, Miss., 
with his parents while an infant; in 1876 moving his residence 
to Carroll County. The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools of Carroll County in his boyhood, then took a 
course in Draughon's Business College, Nashville; after that 
entered the University of Mississippi and studied law, taking 
his Bachelor's degree in 1903. The same year he formed a 
partnership %vith Hon. J. G. McGowen, of Water Valley, for 
law practice, which partnership continued for two years. 
Mr. Harris is a member of the Yalobusha County bar. He 
is a Democrat, a member of the Christian Church, Chancellor 
Commander of the Knights of Pythias. Past Sachem of the 
Improved Order of Red Men, and member of the Woodmen 
of the World; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He was married September 18, 1904, in 
Water Valley, to Eleanor Bradford Duke, daughter of Charles 
William Duke and wife, Mary Elizabeth Duke. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harris have two children: Charles Gerald and John 
Lynn, Jr. 




Charles Joseph Burrus. 



YAZOO COUNTY. 

CHARLES JOSEPH BURRUS, of Yazoo City, was 
bom May 23, 1851, the son of James R. Burrus and his wife 
Laurentina (Walker) Burrus. of that city. His ancestors on 
both sides came to America from England prior to the Revo- 
lutionary War, the paternal line settling in Virginia, the 
maternal in Georgia. The father of the subject of this 
sketch, a native of Tennessee, was a noted lawyer of Yazoo 
in ante-bellum days; served as Probate Judge and member 
of the State Legislature. Mr. Burrus attended a private 
school in early boyhood and was then sent to Kentucky 
Military Institute, where he graduated in 1869. He com- 
pleted his course in the Law Department of Cumberland 
University in 1872. taking the depree of Bachelor of Laws; 
carried on the practice of his professiun in Yazoo City from 
1872 to 1879, and served as Representative in the State 
Legislature during the sessions of 1900 and 1902. Mr. 
Burrus is a Democrat, a member of the Episcopal Church, 
and has held high official position in the Order of the Wood- 
men of the World; was elected to the House of Representa- 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



080 



tives November 5, 1907. He was married December $, 1878, 
to Myra Cocks, daughter of Philip Gilbert Cocks and his 
wife, Eliza (Du Buisson) Cocks, of Lakeland Plantation, 
Holmes County. Mrs. Cocks is a descendant of a French 
Huguenot family. Mr. and Mrs. Burrus have five children: 
Mrs. Inez (Burrus) Rucker, Charles Joseph, Jr., Cabell 
Breckenridge, Laurentina and Myra. 



THEODORE SCHMITT, of Yazoo City, was bom May 
28, 1845. at Baden, Germany, the son of Joseph Schmitt and 
his wife, Ludovica (Hofstetter) Schmitt. The parents of 
Joseph Schmitt had emigrated from Germany to America in 
1843, settling in Galena. 111., where both died during the 
cholera epidemic of 1848; there their son Joseph had joined 
them in 1847. but after their deaths he went to the South, 
settling in Yazoo City, where his wife and family came to 
him from Germany in 1852. The subject of this sketch was 
educated in the public schools at Ya2,oo. He enlisted May 
3, 1861, in Company D of the Eighteenth Mississippi Regi- 
ment; was wounded in the battle of Malvern Hill and was 
retired; re-enlisted with Wirt Adams Cavalry in September, 
1863, but by a wound in the foot May 16, 1864, was dis- 
abled for further military duty. Mr. Schmitt was President 
of the Board of Supervisors of Yazoo County from 1882 to 
1884; Mayor of Yazoo City 1894-1896; was elected to the 
House of Representatives November 5, 1907- He is a 
Democrat; a member of the Catholic Church and a Wood- 
man of the World. He married Mary Gertrude O'Keefe 
November 7, 1872; she is the daughter of Maurice O'Keefe 
and wife, Margaret (Byms) O'Keefe. Mr. and Mrs. Schmitt 
have six children: Gertrude, Frank G., Louise, Theodore M., 
Andrew B. and William A. Mr. Schmitt has recently begun 
an important work in the development of ■svild lands in 
Washington and Sunflower Counties, which he purchased 
over twenty-five years ago. 




Theodore Schmitt. 



WILLIAM MOORE HUDSON, of Yazoo City, was born 
March 24, 1856. near Kosciusko. Attala County, Miss., and 
is the son of Robert Spencer Hudson and wife, Nancy 
Elvira (Gray) Hudson. His paternal ancestors came from 
South Carolina. The father of the subject of our sketch 
was a famous lawyer, a m.ember of the convention that 
passed Mississippi Ordinance of Secession; Circuit Judge 
from 1861 to 1S65; member of the State Legislature in 1875, 
and Chairman of the Committee on Impeachment of Gov- 
ernor Ames. Mr. Hudson attended the common schools of 
Yazoo City and obtained his collegiate education at Oxford, 
Miss., where he studied 'during the years 1875-77. He 
studied law but never practiced, and has followed the occu- 
pation of Insurance Agent. He was Justice of the Peace in 
Warren County in 1887-88. He is a Democrat, an adherent 
of the Catholic Church and member of the orders of the 
Woodmen of the World and of the Elks. Was elected to the 
House of Representatives November 5, T907. He was mar- 
ried January 16, 1SS9, at Vicksburg to Eli/.a W. Crozier. 
daughter of Edward W. Crozier and wife. EHza Quackenbos 
Crozier. of Palmyra. Mr. and Mrs. Hudson had but one 
child, a son, who died in his fourteenth vear. 
35 




^^ 



-:^ 






William M. Hudson. 



1090 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



FLOATER REPRESENTATIVES. 




Robert Eli Bennett. 




Albert C. Anderson. 



FRANKLIN AND LINCOLN COUNTIES. 

ROBERT ELI BENNETT, of Meadville. was bom Sep- 
tember 25. 1871, at Little Springs, Franklin County, Miss., 
the son or James Paul Bennett and wife. Sarah Rebecca 
(Carruth) Bennett. Both paternal and maternal ancestors 
came from the Carolinas to Mississippi in pioneer times. 
His father enlisted as a private in Company A, Seventh Mis- 
sissippi Regiment, known as the "Franklin Rifles," became 
Orderly Sergeant and fought through the war. Mr. Bennett 
attended the public schools of Little Springs and the High 
School at Auburn; he took an irregular course at Millsaps 
College, Jackson, entering in October, 1895, and finally 
completing the law course in 1903- During the intervening 
periods he taught school in Lincoln and Franklin Counties 
to defray his college expenses. Since 1905 he has been in 
active practice of law in his town and county. He filled an 
unexpired term as County Superintendent of Education in 
1900, and was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Bennett is a member of the M. E. 
Church, South and of the orders of Woodmen of the World, 
Odd Fellows and Masons. He was married September 25, 
1907, to Augusta Lena Newman, daughter of Rudolph Ses- 
sions Newman and Sarah Edith (Cowart) Newman, of Veto, 
Miss. Her family is descended from the pioneers of Ken- 
tucky. 

TIPPAH AND BENTON COUNTIES. 

ALBERT CLARENCE ANDERSON, of Ripley, was 
bom February 7, 1878, at Dumas, Tippah County, Miss., 
the son of William Walter Anderson and wife, Mar>' Elizabeth 
(Shackelford) Anderson. Ancestors were native Mississippians 
from an early day ; his father entered the Confederate Array 
in 1863, on reaching the age of eighteen years, and saw 
active fighting under General Forrest and General Joe 
Johnston. Mr. Anderson attended the public schools of 
Tippah in youth, but counts the most important part of his 
training that obtained under Professor L. H. Jobe at the 
Dumas Institute. He lived on the farm whereon he was 
bom until November, 1903, when he purchased the Southern 
Sentinel, and since then has been editor and proprietor of 
that paper; although without previous newspaper training, 
he has succeeded well. Mr. Anderson was a member of the 
Legislature in the sessions of 1900-1902; he is a Democrat; 
was delegate to State conventions of 1899 and 1904; was 
sent by the State Cotton Association to the National meet- 
ing at New Orleans in Jahuar\', 1905; Farmers' Union dele- 
gate to State meeting at Jackson, 1907: represented his 
Congressional District at Waterways Convention at Mem- 
phis, 1907; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907; is a member of the Baptist Church, of 
the Masonic Order, of Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of 
the World. -Mr. .Anderson was m;i,rr(ed at Dumas Decem- 
ber 24, 1905, to Frances Caroline Humphrey, daughter of 
John William and Belle Humphrey; they^-l»a.ve one chiM. 
William Humphrey Anderson. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



1001 



CLAIBORNE AND JEFFERSON COUNTIES. 

JOHN FOSTER FRIERSON. of Port Gibson, was born 
July I, 1876, at Okolona, Chickasaw County^ and is the son 
of Rev. William Vincent Frierson and his wife, Florence 
(Foster) Frierson. His ancestors on both sides were Scotch 
and Scotch-Irish, early settlers in the Carolinas. The 
father of the subject of this sketch was a Confederate soldier. 
member of the Second Mississippi Regiment, serving from 
the opening of the war until wounded at Gettysburg in the 
first day's fight; he was President of the Chickasaw Female 
College at Pontotoc from 1877 to 1892, and is no.v Superin- 
tendent of Palmer Orphanage, Columbus. Mr. Frierson 
attended the Pontotoc Male Academy, then entered the 
Presbyterian University at Clarksville, Tenn.. graduating 
with A. B. degree in 1899; taught school for seven years 
after leaving college at French Camp and Okolona schools, 
and in the Chamberlain-Hunt Academy, Port Gibson. 
While teaching at the last named place he read law in th3 
office of Hon. J. McC. Martin, and was admitted to the bar 
in January, 1906, beginning practice in June of the samz 
year as the junior member of the firm of Martin and Frierson; 
Port Gibson; was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. Mr. Frierson is a Democrat; an elder 
in the Presbyterian Church and a Mason. He is unmarried. 




John F. Frierson. 



, - CLARKE AND JASPER COUNTIES. 

JOHN DAVID FARTHERREE. of Quitman, was bom 
April 9, 1879, near DeSoto, Clarke County, the son of John 
Ware Fartherree and wife, Louisa (Sellars) Fartherree. 
His paternal ancestors were French Huguenots who settled 
in the Carolinas and came to Mississippi in 1820; maternal. 
came from South Carolina; his father enlisted in 186 1 in the 
"Jasper Grays," the first company formed in Jasper County; 
he served through the war until the siege of Petersburg, 
where he was wounded and came home. Mr. Fartherree 
obtained his early education in the common schools of 
Clarke County; later he entered Millsaps College and 
graduated from the Law Department of that institution May 
9, 1902. During the same month he was admitted to the 
bar and began practice as an attorney. He was elected to 
the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. Mr. 
Fartherree is a Democrat and is a member of the M. E. 
Church. South, at McGowan's Chapel in Clarke County. 
He is unmarried. 



GRENADA AND MONTGOMERY COUNTIES. 

MARCELLUS HUTSON ALLEN, of Winona, was bom 
May 9, 1834, in Marion Coimty, Alabama, the son of Francis 
Asbury Allen and wife, Ruth (Adair) Allen. Patemal 
ancestors were of English, maternal of Irish descent; his 
patemal great-grandfather, Charles Allen, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, and was wounded at the battle of 
Charleston. He lived to be 107 years old. Mr. Allen attend- 
ed the rurul schools near Winona, and enrolled in the insti- 
tution at College Grove. Williamson County, Tenn., but left 




John D. Fartherree. 




1002 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



school in March, 1861, and went home to enter the Con- 
federate Army. He enlisted as a private in Company B, 
Fifteenth Mississippi Regiment; during the same year be- 
canie Tliird Lieutenant of his company; was appointed First 
Lieutenant at the reorganization of the army; ^ust before 
the war ended. Mr. Allen was a merchant from 1865 to 
1869. and since then has been a farmer. He was Mayor of 
Lodi, Miss., from 1866 to 1874; was elected Floater Rep- 
resentative from Montgomery' and Choctaw Counties in 
1878, and was elected to the House of Representatives 
November 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, a steward in the 
M. E. Church, South, member of the A. F. and A. M., also of 
the Royal Arch Masons. He was married at Winona, Miss., 
June 24, 1869, to Mary Malvina Evans, daughter of Duncan 
Evans and Marilda Adline Evans, their family is of Scotch 
descent. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have five children: Francis 
Albert Allen, of Winona; Mrs. Anna Lou (Allen) Hamer, 
Winona; -William Duncan Allen, of Kilmichael; Marcellus 
Hutson Allen, Jr., Winona, and John Russel Allen. 




William B. Woodall. 



LEAKE AND WINSTON COUNTIES. 

WILLIAM BUTLER WOODALL, of Noxapater, was 
bom November 8, 1875. ^^ Plattsburg, Winston County, 
Miss., the son of Henry Martin Woodall and wife, Elizabeth 
(Young) Woodall. His paternal ancestors werciariginally 
from England. Mr. Woodall obtained his early education 
in the public schools of Plattsburg under Professor G. F. 
Boyd and other teachers. He entered Mississippi Normal Col- 
lege at Houston, where he was graduated in 1899' with degree 
of B. L. and honor of being Salutatorian of his class. His 
occupations have been teaching and farming; was elected 
to the House of Representatives November 5, 1907. He is 
a Democrat, a member of the Baptist Church and of the 
order of Masons. He was married March 21, 1900, at 
Plattsburg to Mary Susan Boswell, daughter of Richard J. 
Boswell and wife, Mary Boswell,- of that place. Mr. and 
Mrs. Woodall have three children: Thelma, Bonnie Kate 
and Willie Labon. 




Horace Bloom fu 



HARRISON COUNTY. 

HORACE BLOO.MFIELD. of Gulfport, was born Sep- 
tember 30, 1855, at New Orleans, La., has lived in Missis- 
sippi since childhood, and is the son of George Thomas Bloom- 
fleld, a native of Tittlesdale, Norfolk County, England (who 
on coming to the Ur.ited States first lived in the city of New 
York and afterwards in New Orleans), and wife. Harriett 
Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Tunis Baldwin and wife. 
Mary (Donington) Baldwin, of New Orleans; both paternal 
and maternal ancestors being of English origin. Thomas 
Baldwin, a maternal ancestor, was a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion. Mr. Bloomfield attended school at Handsl)oro, Miss., 
under the instn.iction of Prof. J. B. Suyer, an<l later at Trinity 
High School at Pass Christian, Miss., under Rev. W. E. 
Phillips and Prof. E. Lee Blanton; studied law in the oflRce 
of Hon. W. G. Henderson, at Handsboro; was admitted to 
the bar by the Circuit Court, James S. Hannn. Judge; began 
the practice of law in 1S78; fonncd a partnershij^ in 1S78 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



loai 



with Hon. Roderick Seal, which continued until 1899. Mr. 
Bloomfield was elected to the State Senate in 1889 from the 
district comi)Osed of Jackson, Hancock and Harrison Coun- 
ties; represented said district in the sessions of 1890, 1892, 
1894, and was elected State Senator from the same district 
November 3, 1903. Mr. Bloomfield is a Democrat, bachelor, 
and is identified with the Masonic fraternity. In the Senate 
of 1 904-1 908 Mr. Bloomfield was a member of the following 
committees: Judiciary, Railroads and Franchises, Federal 
Relations, Public Lands, Public Health and Quarantine, 
Joint Committee Investigating State Offices. Mr. Bloom- 
field is now engaged in the practice of law, and was elected 
to the House of Representatives from Harrison County 
November 5, 1907. He is a member of the Mississippi State 
Bar Association and assisted in its reorganization during 
the session of the Legislature of 1906. 



YAZOO AND HINDS COUNTIES. 

CHARLES HURST PERKINS, of Yazoo City, was 
bom February 24, 1850, at Benton, Yazoo County, the son 
of R. S. G. Perkins and wife, Judith N. (Hurst) Perkins. 
His ancestors on both sides were from Virginia; his fathei 
was a lawyer of note in his time, served two terms in the 
State Legislature; was District Attorney four years, and for 
four years (1837-1841) was Circuit Judge. Mr. Perkins 
attended the common schools of his county and was a stu- 
dent in the Benton High School, when Professor William 
King was principal there. He entered the University of St. 
Louis, Mo., where he remained a year, but did not graduate. 
He read law under Judge Robert Hudson, of Yazoo City; 
was admitted to the bar in 1878 under Judge S. S. Calhoon; 
has carried on the practice of his profession in Yazoo City 
ever since. Mr. Perkins was a member of the State Legis- 
lature 1888-89 and 1890-91, and was again elected Novem- 
ber 5, 1907. He is a Democrat, a member of the M. E. 
Church, South, and of the Order of Odd Fellows. He is not 
married. 




Charles H. Perkins 



LEE AND ITAWAMBA COUNTIES. 

WILLIAM SYLVESTER SHEFFIELD, of Dorsey. was 
bom January 9, 1847. in Itawamba County, Miss., and is the 
son of Morgan Barnard and wife, Sarah Sheffield. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was reared by his maternal grandfather 
(Sheffield), and took his name. His ancestors were of En- 
glish origin and emigrated to North Carolina, thence to Mis- 
sissippi. .Mr. Sheffield attended the primary schools of 
Itawamba County, under the instruction of James Pharr, 
Benjamin Johnson and others; has been farming since 1867; 
sorved as Sheriff of Itawamba County from 1S8S to 1S90; 
mcmV)er of House of Representatives from 1896 to 1900; 
re-elected November 3. 1903. and 1907; was Confederate 
soldier. Second Sergeant Company 1, Eleventh Mississippi 
Cavalry; enlisted in September, 1863, and served until close 
of war. Mr. Sheffield is a Democrat; County Committee- 
man; member of Baptist Church, clerk; Mason; married 
February at. 1867. to Nancy Catherine Robinson, daughter 




William S. Sheffield. 



1094 LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



of Archie Robinson and wife. Elizabeth Robinson. Mrs 
Sheffield's ancestors were from Virftinia. Mr. and Mrs. Shef- 
field have ten children: Ebbie D.. Myrtle (Sheffield) Stidham. 
Lena (Sheffield) Loden, Clcmmie (Sheffield) Cayson and 
Winnie Davis (Sheffield) Riley. In the House of 1904-1908 
Mr. Sheffield was a member of the following committees: 
Ways and Means, Constitution, Railroads, and Manufactures 
(Chairman). 



^L"/i- . VU- 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT, 



PART VII. I 

' . J 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT, 1007 

COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. ^-Ben S. Chase Natchez 

Second District. — Jas. N. Ogden R. F. D. No. 1, Natchez 

Third District. — E. G. Baker Jeannettc 

Fourth District. — Jas. H. McClure Natchez 

Fifth District.— W. H. RatcHff Washington 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — G. J. Balin Natchez 

Second District. — A. B. Sojourner :._R. F. D. No. 1, Natchez 

Third District. — John F. Carter Jeannette 

Fourth District.ir-WilmeT Shields Natchez 

N. E. Lazarus Pine Ridge 

Fifth District. — R. L. Castleman Natchez 

John Kennedy . 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — A. M. Seaman Natchez 

Fourth District. — E. G. Quarterman Natchez 

Alex. Johnson 

Fifth District. — Jas. Hutton Natchez 

ALCORN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — T. F. Burnett ._ Route No. 1, Corinth 

Second District. — J. B. Romine Corinth 

Third District. — Edgar Savage Rienzi 

Fourth District.— T. D. McCalla Route No. 4, Corinth 

Fifth District. — M. C. Mathis Burrow 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

jfirst District.—]. C. Tyson Corinth 

W. T. Steen Wenasoga 

R. L. Jones Corinth 

Second District. — S. P. Copeland Kendrick 

R. T. Burcham Glens 

Third District.— T. W. Rinehart Rienzi 

T. J. Taylor Route No. 4, Corinth 

Fourth District.— \\. H. Calvery Kossuth 

J. S. Dillon Corinth 

Fifth District. — J. B. Berryman Pocahontas. Tenn. 

I.N.Spencer Corinth 



1098 COUNTY COVERNME^•T. 



CONSTABLES. 



First District. — D. R. Davis Wenasoga 

Peter Smith Corinth 

Second District. — M. H. Seago Corinth 

Third District. — M. W. Green Rienzi 

Fourth District. — M. K. Anderson Corinth 

Fifth District. — J. W. Mincy ...Kossuth 

AMITE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. C. Anders Liberty 

Second District. — C. L. Hazlewood . .Berwick 

Third District.— W. W. Jackson. Sr ..Gloster 

Fourth District.— G. M. Wells. Smithdale 

Fifth District. — Milton N. Bond Huron 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Chas. Carroll Liberty 

C. L. Milton Zion Hill 

Second District. — H. R. Causey Berwick 

E.E.Welch.. Centreville 

Third District. — Guy E. Foreman R. F. D.. Liberty 

B. F. Johns Gloster 

Fourth District.— W. D. Pray . East Fork 

T. F. Badon Smithdale 

Fifth District. — W\ P. Wilson Gillsburg 

. D. J. Wall. Jr -Peoria 

CONSTABLES. " • 

First District. — J. C. Bunifield Liberty 

Second District. — B. S. Smiley Arin 

Third District.— W. L. Huff ...Oneals 

Fourth District. — Lucius Branch Smithdale 

Fifth District.— Jesse N. Tate Gillsburg 

ATTALA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — M. J. Spain 1. Kosciusko 

Second District.—]. D. Boyd . McCool 

Third District.— ]. D. Sanders R. F. D., West 

Fourth District.— R. C. Stingley... Sallis 

Fifth District. — G. W. Lansdale. Pansv 



COUNTY GOVERXMKNT. 1090 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — C. M. Brooke Kosciusko 

C. T. Sweatt Ethel 

Second District. — W. G. Stewart McCool 

N. P. Sweatt Ethel 

Third District. — S. C. Williams -.Kosciusko 

A. W. Skinner Cormack 

Fourth District. — H. C. Glass Durant 

J. W. Wyse '- Saliis 

Fifth District. — J. B. Owen Smyrna 

R. P. F. Doty McCool 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — James L.- McCool Ethel 

Second District. — W. C. Landrum McCool 

Third District.— T. N. Thornton R. F. D., West 

Fourth District. — R. L. Herring Saliis 

Fifth District. — Dorris D. McCool - Newtonville 

BENTON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — B. G. Faulkenburg Pegram 

Second District. — H. W. Hardaway Spring Hill 

Third District.—]. N. Norton R. F. D. No. 1, Ashland 

Fourth District.— T. P. Elliott Pine Grove 

Fifth District. — W. T. Dixon. . Hickory Flat 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District... YL. A. Montgomery R. F. D. No. 1, Ashland 

H. Hines 

Second District. — J . L. Smith Lamar 

J. W. Tucker 

Third District. — Ben Bayden 

Jos. J. Cox, Jr 

Fourth District.— R. P. Smith Pine Grove 

S. N. Wilson Austerlitz 

Fifth District.— T. O.Jones R. F. D. No. 1, Potts Camp 

M. L. Elliott R. F. D. No. 1, Hickory Flat 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— VJ. O Davis R. F. D. No. 2, Faulkner 

Second District. — A. II. Hair.cr Sprine Hi^l 

Third District. — Frank Rees Ashland 

Fifth District. — H. L. Graves Hickorv Fiat 



1100 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

« 

BOLIVAR COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. C. Rainer. Alligator Lake 

Second District. — Whit Blanchard Gunnison 

Third District.— T. L Sanders Cleveland 

Fourth District. — A. R. Harris Skene 

Fifth District. — J. J. Patton , Shaw 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— ].C. West . . Round Lake 

W. G. Brown Duncan 

Second District.— A. W. Turney Shelby 

E. L. Blanchard Gunnison 

J.S.Martin . j Shelby 

Third District. — Robert Arnold 1 Mai vina 

J. A. Cooper Beulah 

J. W. Davis Cleveland 

Fourth District. — T. F. Barry _. Benoit 

Richard Clifford Boyle 

Fifth District. — O. L. Shelby Lamont 

W. F. Doughty Shaw 

CONSTABLE. 

Third District.— W. E. Watts Cleveland 

CALHOUN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— W. R. Byars Pittsboro 

Second District. — W. T, Zinn Sarepta 

Third District.— U. D. Kimzey Ellard 

Fourth District.—]. M. Fox R, F. D. No. 2, Slate Springs 

Fifth District. — M. F. Young Ellzey 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — S. C. Lee Calhoun City 

J. E. Davis Pittsboro 

Second District. — M. A. Hanna Reid 

W, J. Crocker Sarepta 

D. C. Hogan Sarepta 

Third District.— P. C. Davis Elf 

L. P. Fain Pine Valley 

Fourth District. — C. C. Murphree Retreat 

M. S. Weeks R. F. D. No. 1, Slate Springs 

Ernest Moore R. F. D. No. 2, Slate Springs 

Fifth District.— V^. C. Aycock Bentley 

A. T. Davis Wardweil 

J. L. Lucus Hollis 






COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1101 

« 
« 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. W. Aven Pittsborc 

Second District. — G. W. James Reid 

G. B. Shepherd Sarepta 

Third District. — Wallace Simpson Ellard 

Fourth District. — James H. Cole Retreat 

J. R. Hitt Slate Springs 

Fifth District. — J. A. Mosley _. Mollis 

' CARROLL COUNTY. , ' 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — M. E. Hovis North CarroUton 

Second District. — J. P. Lott^ North CarroUton 

•Third District. — A. B. Ruscoe Hemingway j 

Fourth District. — James H. Stanford .--- -__--_ CarroUton 

Fifth District. — G. N. Michie - - _ Vaiden 

■"'■"/ JUSTICE OF PEACE. ' } 

First District. ^U. P. Mullen .__. ___North CarroUton '; 

J. E. McCracken "._ j 

Second District. — John H. Lee Hambrick ■ 

C. M. Garrard . Huff 

Third District. — J . W. H uggins Hemingway 

J. A. Rieves Vaiden 

Fourth District. — John C. Allen ' CarroUton 

Benj. T. Laws CarroUton I 

Fifth District.— W. C. Thomas Vaiden : 

T. A. Brock. Brock | 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — S. A. Corley North CarroUton 

Second District. — James D. Ray Clarks Mill | 

Third District.—]. M. Shute Black Hawk 1 

J, W. Buford Hemingway ' 

Fourth District. — W. A. Sudduth ._ CarroUton 

Fifth District. — J. M. McNeill . Vaiden 

CHICKASAW COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— S. E. Atkinson R. F. D. No. 2, Houston 

Second District. — J. W. Winter . I Schooner 

Third District.—]. H. Stone Okolona 

Fourth District.—]. A. Trcnor.--.- R. F. D. No. 3, Houston 

Fifth District.— A. ]. Wilson R. F. D. No. 2, Houston 



1102 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



JlJSTICE OP PEACE. 

First District. — D. A. Blair Parkersburg 

J. R. Chennault Parkersburg 

Second District. — F. J. Walker Houlka 

Ivy Kimbrough- Coleville 

Third District.— E. N. Abbott- Okolona 

G. S. Pell 

Fourth District. — Jesse Gilliam Beuna Vista 

D. R. Huffman McCondy 

Fifth District. — G. E. Pate Sparta 

W. W. Roberts Woodland 

J. A. Summerall Atlanta 

CONSTABLES. ' 

First District. — R. M. Peden Houston 

Second District. — Fife Williams -. Houlka 

Tom Davis . - 

Third District.— C. C. Jolly __. Okolona 

M, A. Johnson Egypt 

Fourth District. — J. B. Parker _Beuna Vista 

Fifth District.— H. L. Nichols _ _ -Woodland 

S. W. Evans -. — ..Sparta 



CHOCTAW COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. R. King Ackerman 

Second District. — L. R. Breland Mathiston 

Third District.—]. H. Tabor ...Weir 

Fourth District. — H. B. Black Weir 

Fifth District. — W. T. McDowell Ackerman 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— G. N. Tullos Chester 

Jep. Bruce Ackerman 

Second District. — J . W. Christopher Reform 

A. E. Oswalt Mathiston 

Third District. — H. B. Pierce _ W^eir 

J. N. Franks Weir 

Fourih District.— \Y. J. Gladney McCool 

L. D. Moore McCool 

Fifth District. — N. Lee Ackerman 

J. S. Rhodes _ _ 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1 lOi 



CONSTABLES. 



First District. — Riley Ray Chester 

Second District. — J no. W. Ray Ackerman 

Third District.—]. L. Bramblett Weir 

Fourth District. — A. H. Kennedy Spay 

Fifth District.— C. D. West - 



CLAIBORNE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — B. H. Shaifer Port Gibson 

Second District. — W, L. Taylor Willows 

Third District.— ] . M. Nelson Willows 

Fourth District. — J. B. McMurchy Hermanville 1 

Fifth District.— L. Allred McBride j 



JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — H. M. Colson Port Gibson 

E.W.Davis Port Gibson 

Second District. — W. J. Pearson Grand Gulf 

T. D. Willis Ingleside 

Third District.— B. W. Lum Rocky Springs 

N. B. Fisher R. F. D. No. 2, Utica 

Fourth District. — W. G. Herrington Hermanville 

A. R. Chunn Hermanville 

Fifth District. — J. P. Martin Barland 

H. C. Daniels -Barland 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— W. S. Beard Port Gibson 

Second District. — L. T. Norwood Ingleside 

Third District. — J. L. Crawford Rocky Springs 

Fourth District. — Jno. G. Griffing Hermanville 

Fifth District. — Jno. McClure Violet 

j-i 
CLARKE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — John. S Thompson Quitman 

Second District. — F. M. Hardee R. F. D. No. 3, Quitman 

Third District. — Randolph George Enterprise 

Fourth District. — R. Y. Neal Energy 

Fifth District.— G. J. Everett ..Langsdale 



1104 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

JUSTICE OP PEACE. 

First District. — J. R. Green. Quitman 

Geo. W. Kennedy R. F. D. No. 3, Quitman 

Second District.— D. R. Reed R. F. D. No. 3, Quitman 

H. A. McCarty__ , Shubuta 

Third District. — H. R. Ward Enterprise 

Samuel L. Adler Stonewall 

Fourth District. — M. T. Shirley Hurricane Creek 

N. A. Fountain R. F. D. No. 1, Quitman 

Fifth District. — Thos. P. Home Langsdale 

H. P. Dobbins Melvin, Ala. 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. J. Parker -Quitman 

Second District. — Geo. F. Bass __' Pachuta 

Third District. — Joseph Willis Enterprise 

Fourth District. — Jeff Hays Snell 

Fifth District. — E. L. Brewer Langsdale 

CLAY COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— U. W. Wilson. . West Point 

Second District.—]. W. Hicks. ._ R. F. D. No. 2, West Point 

Third District.— ]. H. Jackson __R. F. D. No. 1, West Point 

Fourth District.— W. R. Dexter R. F. D. No. 1, Abbott 

Fifth District— T. J. Mitchell Pheba 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. W. Wiley 

M. S. McAdams 

Second District. — Will Smith West Point 

John Martin West Point 

Third District.— ]3.s. Calvert- . R. F. D. No. 1, Abbott 

J. G. Smith Una 

W. R. Bonds Cedar Bluff 

Fourth District.— \. D. Gorden R. F. D. No. 2, Cedar Bluff 

H. M. Carlisle. -- 

Fifth District.— T.T. Reid 

J. F. Lee 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — V. T. McAdams West Point 

Second District. — E. S. Montgomery West Point 

Third District.— R. Hurse 

Fourth District.— H. J. Stringfellow R. F. D. No. 2, Cedar Bluff 

Fifth District.— R.C.Vsiil ......_ 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1105 

COAHOMA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.—]. E. Barbee - Lula 

Second District. — T. S. Aderholdt Friar's Point 

Third District. — J. M. Montroy Coahoma 

Fourth District.— ^. D. Cutrer Clarksdale 

Fijth District.— F. G. Bobo-.. Bobo 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — M. E. Wilson Lula 

Second District. — F. L. Puckett Friar's Point 

Jackson Fisher Friar's Point 

G. J. Copped ge Stovall 

Third District. — W. N . Blood worth Jonestown 

fourth District. — J. B. Killebrew Clarksdale 

W. G. Landers Clarksdale 

S. P. Smith..-. . Mattson 

CONSTABLE. 

Fourth District.—]. D. Talbirt Clarksdale 

COPIAH COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — D. D. McLehaney Hazlehurst 

Second District. — R. C. Douglass Wesson 

Third District. — M. E. Furr Nannye 

Fourth District. — R. B. Greenlee Conn 

Fifth District. — R. A. Evans Crystal Springs 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — A. W. Russell Hazlehurst 

T. J. Kent Hazlehurst 

Second District. —T. T. Hardy . Wesson 

G. H. Gardner Ashley 

Third District. — S. S. Newman ' Allen 

John W\ Newton Barlow 

Fourth District. — J. D. Jenkins Utica 

W. B. Caussey Perks 

Fifth District.— K. D. Slay Cr>'stal Springs 

L. B. Loflin Crystal Springs 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. C. Lowe Hazlehurst 

Second District. — -L. O. Sumrall Wesson 

Third District. — M. H. Hawkins Barlow 

Fourth District. — C. N . Holden L'tica 

Fifth District. — J. R. Brown Crystal Springs 



1106 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



COVINGTON COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. E. Odum Collins 

Second District.— W. O. Watts R. F. D. No. 1, Sumrall 

Third District.— J. C. Thames Collins 

Fourth District. — Henry McNair Mt. Olive 

Fifth District.— Sam Williamson R. F. D., Collins 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — D. P. Mclnnis Seminary 

Willie Hodge Seminary 

Second District. — John Ingram Sanford 

J. C. Lott R. F. D. N0..I, Sumrall 

Third District. — J. F. Williamson Collins 

C. G. Guice -Collins 

Fourth District. — Archy Fairly-- Mt. Olive 

F. M. Mathis -Dry Creek 

Fifth District.— J. N. Mayfield R. F. D., Collins 

E. C. Pridgen R. F. D. No. 1, Collins 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — G. W. EUzy Seminary 

Second District. — J. L. Lott R. F. D. No. 1 , Sumrall 

Third District. — G. A. Jones Collins 

Fourth District. — R. A. Leonard Mt. Olive 

Fifth District.— R. W. Robertson R. F. D. No. 1, Coliins 

DeSOTO COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.—]. C. Long R. F. D., Byhalia 

Second District. — M. C. Dickson Horn Lake 

Third District. — G. T. Thomas Eudora 

Fourth District. — L. L. Jones Cub Lake 

Fifth District.— B. E. Wilson Nesbitt 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — ^W. L. Kerr- : Cockrum 

W. R. Dye Cedar View 

Second District. — T. J. Wilroy - Pleasant Hill 

H. F. Dickson Horn Lake 

Third District. — J. H. McGowan Lake View 

J. P. Buford Lake Cormorant 

Fourth District. — J. W. Nichols Eudora 

A. A. Freeze _ Hernando 

Fifth District. — R. A. Logan Days 

W\ D. PhilHps - Hernando 



'■ 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1107 



CONSTABLES. 



First District. — W. T. Watkins Cedar View 

Second District. — Sid Campbell Horn Lake 

Third District. — Ben Coward Lynchburg 

Fourth District. — J. O. White Eudora 

Fifth District. — W. L. Gore Hernando 



FORREST COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 



First District.—] . P. Pace 

Second District. — J. C. McDonald 

Third District. — John L. Davis 

Fourth District. — W. A. Conn 

Fifth District.—S. E. Perkins 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— E. J. Wall 

W. C. Hardee 

Second District. — J. E. Davis 

W. F. Wedgworth 1. 

Third District. — B . A. Ward 

J. W. Bolton 

Fourth District. — A. D. Carter 

A. D. Hartfield 

Fifth District.—S. B. Randall 

S. P. Courtney 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. G. Fairley 

Second District. — C. P. Wallace. 

Third District.— Thos. J. Williams.^ 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— T. C. Clay -.Suffolk 

Second District.— H. P. Hall Oldenburg 

Third District. — A. B. Sullivan Meadville 

Fourth District. — Jeil H. Cotten McCall Creek 

Fifth District.— \\\ H . Coward xMcCall Creek 



1108 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



JUSTICE OF PEACE. 



First District. — H. G. Butler Knoxville 

W. H. Graves .Roxie 

J. M. Hill (Smyrna Special) Suffolk 

Second District. — J. L. Calcate : Hamburg 

Cade Calcate Oldenburg 

Third District.— VJ . J. Sullivan . Veto 

Frank Priest Veto 

Fourth District. — S. C. Kennedy Kennolia 

A. L. Sample McCall Creek 

Fifth District. — R. L. Wilkinson Dick 

Charley Gammill _. Little Springs 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — O. M. Graves 1 Roxie 

Carl Middleton Roxie 

Louis Carbon (Smyrna Special) .Suffolk 

Second District. — J. T. McLemore Hamburg 

Third District. — Enoch Willis .Meadville 

Fourth District. — Felder Smith Kennolia 

Clarence McGehee McCall Creek 

Fifth District. — Vess Freeman Little Springs 



GREENE COUNTY. .,-.-^ 

SUPERVISORS. . " 

First District. — J. J. Mclnnis Leakesville 

Second District. — L. C. Peaster--- State Line 

Third District. — Gaines West Grafton 

Fourth District. — D. C. Eubanks Mullett 

Fifth District. — C. O. Backstrom McLain 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Second District. — J. T. Dearman Avera 

J. P. Avera Avera 

Third District. — John A. Dunnam Grafton 

M. W. Moody- i__ McLain 

Fourth District.—^. B. Box .Vernal 

J. M. Raby Merrill 

Hui^h Jones Lucedale" 

Fifth District. — W, W. Thomson ...Leaf 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1109 

GRENADA COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — A. Olson Elliott 

Second District. — J. E. Shaw -Redding 

Third District. — J. N. Roberts Youngs 

Fourth District. — W. R. Baker_ Grenada 

Fifth District. — J. A. Gibson Grenada 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Robt. Crawford _ — Grenada 

W. G. Penn Elliott 

Second District. — Wm. Fenner Gray sport 

G. L. Polland Misterton 

Third District. — W . J. Clark Youngs 

Fourth District. — ^W. S. Bailey Tatum 

G. E. Thomas _ 

Fifth District. — B . L. Harris. Oxberry 

W. E. Etibanks • 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — W. A. Odom _•_ - — Grenada 

Second District. — W. R. A. James Susie 

Third District. — C. L. Clark — Youngs 

Fourth District. — A. J. Thomerson __- Tatum 

Fifth District. — C. A. Carpenter Oxberry 



HANCOCK COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First Distrix:t. — H. S. Weston Logtown 

Second District. — S. C. Whitfield Nicholson 

Third District. — J. L. Stockstill Carriere 

Fourth District. — T. J. McArthur Catahoula 

Fifth District. — L. S. Bourgeois Waveland 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. A. Seal 

Freeman Jones 

Third District. — J. P. Mitchell Carriere 

Fourth District.—}. A. Haas : Kiln 

Mannel Castro Kiln 

Ftfth District — ]. A Breath Bay St. Louis 

Darius L. Combel Waveland 



1110 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



HARRISON COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — F. W. Elmer Biloxi 

Second District. — Thomas E. Cruthirds Gulfport 

Third District. — John Scarborough Cuevas 

Fourth District. — D. J. Brown. Wiggins 

Fifth District.— A. J. Bond _--__-- . .Wisdom 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— Z. T. Champlin Biloxi 

J. A. Latimer Lazarus 

Second District. — J. R. Kelly :_ -Gulfport 

H. D. Moore Gulfport 

T. A. Cleary..."- 

Third District. — E. J. Adam Pass Christian 

Fred Frank _ Cuevas 

Fourth District. — John N. Dale McHenry 

W. J. Evans Bond 

Fifth District. — T. Jackson Evans, Sr Wisdom 

R. W. Hatten " Wisdom 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Nathaniel Bolton Bilox 

Second District. — J. C. Corbett Gulfport 

Third District. — F. P. Lizana . Pass Christian 

Fourth District. — W. K. Langford 

Fifth District. — Vernon Spikes Wisdom 

• HINDS COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. D. Gordon Jackson 

Second District. — Jesse Birdsong Bolton 

Third District.— E. P. Whitaker . : Duke 

Fourth District. — A. Puryear Dry Grove 

Fifth District.— D. L. Lewis Siwel 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— J. F. Whitfield Clinton 

J, G. Tennin . Pocahontas 

P. B. Lancaster Asylum 

Second District. — D. A. McNeill Bolton 

W. B. Atkinson Brownsville 

I. H. W. Barrett Edwards 

I'hird District. — J. B. Collins Utica 

R. H . Footc Cayuga 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1111 

Fourth District. — L. H . Lowry Learned 

P. J. Dolan Raymond 

Fifth District. — J. M. Cade Jackson 

L. H. Milligan _ Byram 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Will Smith Pocahontas 

H. T. Hollingsworth Clinton 

S. R. Granberry Jackson 

Second District. — J. W. Balls Bolton 

R. H. Hardy _ Brownsville 

A. C. Lowry. _ Edwards 

Third District. — J. M. Shelton Utica 

Fourth District. — O. M. Green Raymond 

Fifth District. — P. H. Fairley Jackson 

HOLMES COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — T. G. Stephenson 

Second District. — D. J. Crawford J 

Third District. — G. S. Rogers | 

Fourth District. — W. L. Smith i 

Fifth District.— B.. E. Buck -^j 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. S. Lipsey ^ 

O. F. Hosea 

Second District. — ^W. J. Morris 

A. C. Howell 

Third District. — C. J. Spell 

W. S. Pierce .. 

Fourth District. — J. A. Long 

R. M. Edwards---- 

S. A. KiUebrew 

Fifth District.— W. B. Stanford 

J. H. McGee 

A. J. Kelly 

CONSTABLES. 

First District— R. C. Barger 

Second District. — ^Walker Grace 

Third District.— T. L. Ellison 

Fourth District. — Sara Carson 

G. W. Trigleth 

Fifth District.— F. E. Steele 

R. J. Whittington _-_ 



1112 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

ISSAQUENA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. — 

First District. — Henry L. Mayer Magna Vista 

Second District. — Jas. E. Peeler Fitlers 

Third District.— P. C. Mitchell Tallula 

Fourth District. — S. B. Duncan Baleshed 

Fifth District. — E. A. Passino Valewood 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — G. W. Carter Magna Vista 

Second District. — R. B. Shields Fitlers 

A. M. Lee Fitlers 

Third District. — T. E. Pinkston Ben Lomond 

J. R. Clark Tallula 

Fourth District. — I. H. Mobley Mayersville 

M. Herzog Mayersville 

Fifth District. — John Griffin Duncansby 

Joseph Gravois Grace 

ITAWAMBA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — R. G. Lee Eastman 

Second District. — ^W. F. Ford_ Dorsey 

Third District. — H. A, Rutledge _Cardsville 

Fourth District. — C. Leech R. F. D., Smithville 

Fifth District.—]. T. Dulaney R. F. D., Fulton 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — John Collier Eastman 

Dee Fawlkner Eastman 

Second District. — Thomas Phillipps RatliS 

N. L. Maxwell Ratliff 

Third District. — J. G. Wood --i Dorsey 

T. N. Francis Dorsey 

Fourth District. — Geo. Sanders R. F. D., Smithville 

J. D. Crouch .-----R. F. D.. Smithville 

Fifth District.—]. O. Smith R. F. D., Fulton 

R. I. Harden R. F. D., Fulton 

J. G. Benson R. F. D., Clay 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Daniel Collum R. F. D., Eastman 

Second District. — Robert Grissom R. F. D., Ratli5 

Third District. — W. A. Loden R. F. D., Dorsey 

Fourth District. — J. T. Gann R. F. D. , Rara Avis 

Fifth District. — A. L. Pierce R. F. D., Fulton 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1113 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — James B. Goff Basin 

Second District. — W. J. Johnson Wade 

Third District. — R. A. Roberts Orange Grove 

Fourth District. — W. R. Bilbo Ocean Syrings 

Fifth District. — E. E. Flurry ^ Vestry 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.—] . W . Ranager Cross Roads 

M. E. Phipps Shipman 

Second District. — Garland G. GofY Three Rivers 

W. Frank Goff Big Point 

Third District. — Chas. E. Chidsey Scranton 

E. G. Overstreet Moss Point 

Fourth District. — E. W. Illing Ocean Springs 

J. H. Murphy VanCleave 

Fifth District.— L. McAuUy -_- 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — E. Sumrall 

Third District. — M . Ashcraf t — Moss Point 

Fourth District. — L. A. Shriber 

Fifth District.— T. J. MizelL 

Print Nixon 

JASPER COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — "W . B . Shoemaker Turnerville 

Second District.- — J. C. Murray Rose Hill 

Third District. — C. F. Neill j Montrose 

Fourth District. — S. P. Grantham Stringer 

Fifth District.—^. T. Risher Heidelberg 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. W. Parker - Acme 

J. F. Windham Acme 

Second District. — C. M. Foley Hero 

W. B. Lewis Rose Hill 

Third District.— ¥. P. Griffith Garlandsville 

A. J. Lawson Louin 

Fourth District. — J. W. Tucker Moss 

E. W. Simpson Stringer 

Fifth District. — I. C. Newell Heidelberg 

W. C. McCraw Sandersville 



1114 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — A. J. Gregory Turner ville 

Second District. — M. P. Finnegan Rose Hill 

Third District. — M. E. Long. - . Louin 

Fourth District. — J. B. Vandcrslice Acme 

Fifth District. — Henry McClellan 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Wm. B . Scott _ Union Church 

Second District. — Chas, E. HicKs Hicks 

Third District. — Wm. M. Geoghegan Fayette 

Fourth District.~T. Rodney Shields Church Hill 

Fifth District. — Walter G. Marble Lorman 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — C. M. Smith _'__ Union Church 

F.W.Wilkinson Union Church 

O. P. Tanksley (Bethesda) Clark 

Second District. — C. J. Liddell Harriston 

Jno. R. Burks Red Lick 

- Third District. — D. S. Farrar Fayette 

Wm. M. Darden — McNair 

Fourth DJstrict. — Robt. P. Baker Church Hill 

Charles Mardis Church Hill 

Fifth District. — George Schober Rodney 

T. F. Baker Lorman 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — H. E. Norton (Bethesda) Clark 

W. L. Newman Perth 

Amos Foster McBride 

Second District. — D. O. Liddell Harriston 

John J. Andrews Red Lick 

Third District. — B. F. Kinstley Harriston 

K. D. Dennis -_._- " Fayette 

Fourth District. — Leroy L. Foster Church Hill 

Fifth District.— \\' hit Ragillio. 

JEFFERSON DAVIS COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.—]. D.Terrell 

Second District. — N. S. Buckley 

Third District.— T. W. Caraway 

Fourth District. — H. H. Stewart 

Fifth District.— U. Slater _ 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1115 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — S. C. Stamps 

A. G. Dyus - 

Second District. — R. F. Bronton 

Third District. — John Fagan 

W. J. Carter 

Fourth District.— ] . M. Polk 

W. A. Brinson 

Fifth District.— W. C. Morris . 

O. C. Boss - 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — D. H. Barrow 

Fourth District. — A. D. Mclnnis 

Fifth District. — B. B. Scarborough. 

JONES COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — B. DuBose. Ellisville 

Second District. — F. H. Bush Laurel 

Third District.— ]. C. Smith Erata 

Fourth District. — J. A. West Ovett 

Fifth Disrict.—V. S. Collins Moselle 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — W. H. McGowan Ellisville 

J. C. Evans Ellisville 

Second District. — M. H. Holifield Laurel 

G. M. Jefcoat Gitano 

J. T. Singley. Laurel 

Third District. — George Chancellor Laurel 

W. H. Hodge Sandersville 

Fourth District. — B. L. Rodgers Crotts 

E. H. Brown Ovett 

Fifth District.— ^\ D. Grayson Moselle 

J. M. Walters Crosby 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Van Jordan Ellisville 

J. B. Powell __-Ellisville 

Second District. — A. A. Hinton Gitano 

W. P. Valentine Service 

Third District.— W. J . Smith Sanders\^lle 

Joel W. Walters Sandersville 

Fourth District.— T. J. Williams Ovett 

Fifth District.— \\\ W. Crosby Moselle 

Lee Crosby _ Crosby 



I " 



IIIG COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

KEMPER COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. L. Robison.- Scooba 

Second District. — N. G. Briggs Porterville 

Third District. — J. J. Jackson R. F. D. No. 2, Moscow 

Fourth District. — J. E. Luke Preston 

Fifth District. — L. L. Shumate - Zada 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — R. L. Thomas Scooba 

V/. McD. Moore Giles 

W. H. Daniels Binnsville 

Second District. — M. C. Smith Oak Grove 

B. M. Killingsworth Porterville 

Third District. — M. J. Oliver Hand 

J. T. Darnall R. F. D. No. 1, Rio 

Fourth District. — S. W. Davis R. F. D. No. 1, Moscow 

S. D. Baughman Dewey 

Fifth District.— V^. W. Bethany Skipper 

Deck King DeKalb 

M. M. Lightsey ^ Zada 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. F. Rhinehart Scooba 

Second District. — R. M. Bartlett Porterville 

Third District. — R. C. Clark Moscow 

Fourth District. — G. B. Stokes, Preston 

Fifth District.— V. L. Golliherl '. R. F. D. No. 1, DeKalb 

B. P. Germany Skipper 

LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — C. C. Stephens Oxford 

.Second District. — M. D. Wait R. F. D. No. 1, Lafayette Springs 

Third District. — Wm. Huston Teckville 

Fourth District.—]. C. Tredoar ...R. F. D. No. 1, Taylor 

Fifth District. — H. L. Davis Tula 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Jno. F. Brown Oxford 

J. R. McLarty Oxford 

Second District. — Luther C. Butler Holder 

S. F. Hyde R. F. D. No. 1, Lafayette Springs 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1117 

Third District. — W. P. Moncrief Harmantowii 

J. W. Davis Abbeville 

R. A. Shaw College Hill 

FoTtrih District.— \N. J. Lovelady Taylor 

T. A. Sansom Orwood 

Fifth District.— O. W. Fleinmons Delay 

L. H. Neal Tula 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Guy McLarty '. Oxford 

Second District. — J. E. Joiner R. F. D. No. 1, Lafayette Springs 

Third,Dislrict.—\N. M. Bennett Abbeville 

; -- G. T. Elmore Harmantown 

;. Freeman Dunlap College Hill j 

Fourth District. — Walter Tatum . Splinter . j 

Fifth District. — Joe Kisner Delay j 



LAMAR COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. E. Entrekin '. Purvis 

Second District. — D. C. Camp Lumberton 

Third District. — M. Raborn Baxterville 

Fourth District. — J. P. Cole .Jersey 

Fifth District.—]. D. Hatten Sumrall 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — H. B. Freeman Purvis 

J. D. Cain Purvis 

Second District. — W. J. Lee : Lumberton 

J. E. Bufkin Lumberton 

Third District. — Geo. S. Cook : Baxterville 

P. W. Cranmer Baxterville 

Fourth District. — W. W. Carter Richburg 

H. R. Johnson 

Fifth District.— G. W. Johnson Epley 

C. McMellon _ . . Sumrall 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Thomas Phillips - Purvis 

Third District. — C. F. Devrow.,. _ 

Fifth District.— \W. D. Pace... __ 



1118 COUNTY GOVERN'MENT. 

LAUDERDALE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — John H. Kennedy Meridian 

Second District. — Thomas L. Johnson Ponta 

Third District. — Jesse D. Bounds Temple 

Fourth District. — John G. Moore Point 

Fifth District. — Millege Johnson Increase 

JUSTICE OP PEACE. 

First District. — J. Milton Dabney « -Meridian 

Frank Hull Meridian 

Th. C. Kyward Marion 

Second District. — John. R. Beverly Lauderdale 

Jos. F. Kelly Lockarts 

Third District. — William H. Parker. Dahlgren 

L. L. Ratcliff Temple 

Fourth District. — Burwill J. Stinson R. F. D. No. 1, Meridian 

Elijah Nichols Meehan June. 

Fifth District.— T. M. Sims --Tonic 

B. F. Mason Whynot 

CONSTABLES, 

First District. — W. P. Culpepper Meridian 

Edward E, Mosby. . Meridian 

Second District. — A. H. Moore Lauderdale 

Joe C. Allen Laudei*dale 

Third District. — I. H. Vinson Dahlgren 

S. H. Sanford 

Fourth District. — James R. Speed _Meehan Junction 

Fifth District.— H. L. Boswell --Tonic 

L. M. Boswell R. F. D. No. 1, Toomsuba 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — I. H. Bass Monticello 

Second District.— E. B. White Sontag 

Third District. — J. D. Ham Saulsbury 

Fourth District. — L. E. Sills New Hebron 

Fifth District.— C. H. Watts Arm 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — John W. Steen Monticello 

J. R. Cox Nola 

Second District. — N. B. Buckley Sontag 

V. L. Moore-- Tr>'us 

Third District. — John W. Lambert Topeka 

W. T. Holmes _ _ Bismarck 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1119 

Fourth District. — S. J. Sills Grange 

E. F. Turnage New Hebron 

W. I. Cliburn 

Fifth District. — J . M . Armstrong Silver Creek 

P. H. Armstrong _ Arm 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Charles Garvin Monticello 

Second District. — J. D. Keen Nola 

C. L. Ainsworth Sontag 

Third District. — J. M. Brewer Topeka 

Fourth District. — T. C. Myers. Grange 

Fijth District.— B. W. O'Mara Silver Creek - . 

LEAKE COUNTY. - 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — C. M. Roberts Marddell \ 

Second District.— '^. L. Waggoner ___.__R. F. D. No. 2, Carthage '; 

Third District.—]. G. Games R. F. D., Bolatusha \ 

Fourth District.— Y. E. Gilmore R. F. D., Lena j 

Fifth District.— O. H. Bamett-_._ R. F. D. No. 1. Carthage /\ 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. j 

First District. — S. F. Dabbs Barnes \ 

C. L. Barnett Marydell ■ 

E. J. Jolly____ Williston 

Second District. — G. F. McKay Carthage 

J. W. Pope Conway 

T. P. Harkins R. F. D., Conway 

Third District.— Y^ . H. Golden Ofahoma 

R. L. Bell R. F. D., Bolatusha 

Fourth District.— U. L. Gilbert R. F. D. , Lena j 

W. L. McClendon j 

Fifth District.— John C. Watkins__ _R. F. D. No. 1, Carthage I 

W. E. Lay .Walnut Grove j 

W.H.Greer R. F. D. No. 1, Carthage "| 

i 

CONSTABLES. j 

First District.— C. H. McKay R. F. D., Doss\'ille 

H. N. Pickle 

H.E.Saunders 

Second District. — G. C. Carpenter Conway 

D. G. Derrick Conway ; 

Third District.— ]. W. Adams R. F. D., Bolatusha 

R. B. Caston Ofahoma 

Fourth District. — J. E. Hanna Lena 

Fifth District.— T>. J. Britt . _ .'. Walnut Grove 

J. A. Taylor 



1120 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

LEE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— tB. T. Parker Guntown 

Second District.— V^. E. Milam..-- Saltillo 

W. T. Pounds Tupelo 

Fourth District. — W. D. McGaughey Verona 

FiUh District. — Mark Conncll Nettleton 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — C. C. Christopher Guntown 

Henry Butler Route 4, Baldwyn 

Second District.— Y. P. McNiel Route 1, Saltillo 

F. M. Roper ...Saltillo 

Third District.— A. W. Hall Route 2, Tupelo 

G. W. Ritter Belden 

Fourth District. — A. C. McVay .. Plantersville 

R.L.Cobb Route 1, Verona 

Fifth District.— G. W. Pettey Shannon 

B. A. Curry _. -Nettleton 

CONSTABLES, 

First District. — W. L. Parker Guntown 

Second District. — R. A. Love ^_ Saltillo 

Third District.-]. B. Rains 1 Tupelo 

Fourth District. — T. N. Lyle 1 ^^ Route 1, Plantersville 

Fifth District. — J. W. Butler Shannon 

LEFLORE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — R. A. Joiner -~r- - - -Sunny Side 

Second District. — Eli Ethridge Schlater 

Third District. — F. M. Aldridge Greenwood 

Fourth District. — J. L. Haley __". Itta Bena 

Fifth District. — S. I. Brown Sidon 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — C. N . Boswell Minter City 

B. Polewoda Minter City 

Second District. — W. E. Ethridge ..Schlater 

L. F. Frederick Money 

Third District. — D. P. Montgomery Greenwood 

J. E. Dennis ' Greenwood 

Fourth District.— R. F. Love . Itta Bena 

Fifth District. — J. H. McMath Sheppardtown 

R. W. Hatch... Sidon 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1121 



CONSTABLES. 



First District. — W. S. Joiner Minter City 

Third District. — I. W. Parrish Greenwood 

Fourth District. — T. F. Gordon Itta Bena 



LINCOLN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Z, P. Jones ^^ Brookhaven 

Second District. — W, H. Furr Wesson 

Third District. — C. M. Brister Bogue Chitto 

Fourth District. — Geo. H. Moak Summit 

Fifth District. — Louis Nobles Caseyville 

JUSTICE OP PEACE. 

First District. — F. H. Hoffman Brookhaven " j 

J, B. Daughtry Brookhaven | 

Second District. — Geo. T. Douglass Wesson j 

Hamilton Smith Malcum j 

Third District.— T. J. Gill Bogue Chitto j 

C. C. Conerly Edgar 

Fourth District.— "R. R. Allbritton ..Norfield 

L. O. Montgomery Norfield 

Fifth District.—^. P. Pepper Red Star 

R. C. Nobles Red Star 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — H. Lee Hoskins Brookhaven 

Jesse M. Smith Brookhaven 

Second District. — H. D. Womack Wesson 

Third District. —\M. R. Townsend R. F. D. No. 2, Brookhaven 

Fourth District. — J. Alec. Moak Norfield 

Fifth District.— V^. Ed. Smith . . Red Star 



LOWNDES COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— V. J. Ussery R. F. D., Caledonia 

Second District. — Battle Bell Columbus 

Third District.— \\ . D. Phillips R. F. D. No. 3. Columbus 

Fourth District. — J. M. Ledbetter Crawford 

Fifth District. — J. H. Jordan Mayhew 

36 



1122 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. L. Williams Caledonia 

A. R. Egger Caledonia 

Second District. — B. Matthews ^ Columbus 

F. W. Flood Columbus 

Third District.— C. O. Shackelford. __._R. F. D. No. 3, Columbus 
M. N. Franks R. F. D. No. 3, Columbus 

Fourth District.— n. H. Smith 

Fifth District. — C. W. Evans Columbus 

J. B. Prowell 

J, V. Mitchel Artesia 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — H. L. Kendrick Caledonia 

Second District. — Abe Lof tus Columbus 

Third District.—]. G. Wood R. F. D. No. 3, Columbus 

Fifth District.— Y. M. Ragsdale 



MADISON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — F. D. Coleman Canton 

Second District. — J. E. Lane Flora 

Third District. — J. F. Battley Ridgeland 

Fourth District. — W. C. Joyner Shoccoe 

Fifth District. — J. B. Dendy Cameron 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — A. Purviance , __Canton 

R. C. Randel ._ .._. Canton 

Second District. — R. L. Elkin Flora 

Oscar Richardson Adelle 

Third District. — H. C. Montgomery Madison 

C. D. Bennett Madison 

S. L. Goudy . Meltinville 

Fourth District. — W. A. Ray Sulphur Springs 

J. I. Cratin Sulphur Springs 

Fifth, District. — C. L. Anderson Oaks 

R. S. Barrett Couparle 

H. Green waldt Camden 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.--]. H. Brown _ Canton 

Second District. — E. R Cliildress Flora 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1123 

Third District.— ^. F. Hoy Madison 

A. N. McAlpin _ _ 

Fourth District. — R. A. Cobb . Sulphur Springs 

Fifth District.— ]. A. Wales Camden 

Frank McKav Camden 



MARION COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — W. A. Stringer Improve 

Second District. — John B. Dale Hathom 

Third District. — A. A. Beard Buford 

Fourth District. — T. B. Jones . Dexter 

Fifth District. — G. H. Rankin Columbia 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — I. W. Prine Improve 

Second District. — J. C. Ryals _, Goss 

C. W. Lott 1--.- Columbia '^ 

M.F.Thompson 

Third District. — R. D. Dunaway Buford ' 

O. G. May Claude J 

Fourth District.— W. E. Alford Pigott 

J. M. Ryals Ophelia. La. 

Fifth District. — Lamar Hennington Columbia 

W. R. Arnett Hub 

CONSTABLES. .. , 

First District.—]. S. Williams Improve 

Second District. — J. E. Bourn Goss 

Third DislHct.—]. W. Martin Buford 

Fourth District. — Calib Merritt . ..Pickwick 

R. S. Turnage ■ 

Fifth District.— C. N. Lowe Columbia 



MARSHALL COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Ben N. Powell Colbert 

Second District. — Henry Gatewood Slayden 

Third District.— C. T. Hicks Byhalia 

Fotirth District.— V^\ H. Sharp. ._ Wall Hill 

Fifth District.— R. A. Callahan _ _ Beth 



1124 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. B. Mattison Holly Springs 

J. F. M. Coltson Colbert 

J. K. Shaw (Special) Red Banks 

Second District. — R. P. McCandless Slayden 

G. S. Phillips Atway 

Third District. — S. W. Benson Byhalia 

W. H. Boggan Cayce 

Fourth District. — W. R. Jeffries Chulahoma 

H. M. Shaw Laws Hill 

G. T. Coleman (Special) Marianna 

Fifth District.— J . P. Cherry Waterford 

A. E. McCauley Potts Camp 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Jno. S. Doxey Holly Springs 

L. S. McAlexander 

Second District. — Albert Coop wood Mt. Pleasant 

Third District.— C. M. Henry Byhalia 

Fourth District.— A. G. Kerr (Special) Wall Hill 

Jim Fitch ^ 

H. L. Gordon Chulahoma 

Fifth District. — J. M. Bonds (West of Tippah) Waterford 

S. B. Floyd (East of Tippah) Potts Camp 

MONROE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.—}. H. Sullavan _.-.R. F. D., Amory 

Second District. —S. D. Ritter __R. F. D., Amory 

Third District.— W. H. Eikner R. F. D., Hamilton 

Fourth District. — A. C. Lowe * •_ Aberdeen 

Fifth District.— W. L. C. Bailey ._R. F. D. No. 7, Aberdeen 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— V7. H. Sullavan R. F. D., Smithville 

L. G. Pullen R. F. D., Amory 

Second District. — E. G. Mize Quincy 

J. W. Boggan R. F. D., Amory 

Third District. —S. R. Murff R. F. D. No. 1, Gattman 

J. J. Boyd R. F. D., Hamilton 

Fourth District. — B. C. Sims Aberdeen 

B. B. Howell Prairie Station 

Fifth District.— W. B. Pruett R. F. D. No. 7. Aberdeen 

C. H. Marshall R. F. D., Nettleton 

J. H. Worthy R. F. D., Nettleton 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1125 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — W. E. Gregory R. F. D., Amory 

Second District. — J. O. Moon R. F. D., Amory 

C. P. Jones, Jr 

Third District.— A. W. Sandifer R. F. D.. Hamilton 

Fourth District. — E. F. Poe Aberdeen 

Fifth District.— ]. T. Morgan R. F. D., Aberdeen 

Wood J. Roberts R. F. D., Nettleton 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— B. D. Dotson_ R. F. D. No. 3, Wmona 

Second District.— W . H. Tyler Duck Hill 

Third District. — S. H. Parker Alva 

Fourth District. — Joe H. Townsend R. F. D. No. 1, Kjlmichael 

Fifth District. — G. E. Cartledge Poplar Creek 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.—^. D. Fisackerly ___R. F. D. No. 6, Winona 

Jeff F. Patterson.. ___. R. F. D. No. 1, Winona 

Second District. — J. Wiley Mitchell - Duck Hill 

J. Wesley Dale Duck Hill 

Third District. — E. S. Re ves Sweatman 

D. E. Wood R. F. D. No. 2, Sibleyton 

Fourth District. — J. D. Walton Winona 

G. W. Pittman R. F. D. No. 3, Sibleyton 

Fifth District.— B. J. Herring R. F. D. No. 2, Vaiden 

J. M. Cartledge R. F. D. Ko. 2, French Camp 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Lee Gray Winona 

Second District. — F. H. Germana Lilac 

Third District. — C. W. Baker Sweatman 

Pink Pyron Laura | 

Fourth District.—}. W. Hays R. F. D. No. 3, Sibleyton j 

C. F. Allen R. F. D. No. 1. Kilmichael 

Fifth District.— 'E. L. Austin R. F. D. No. 2. Vaiden 

D. M. Cartledge R. F. D. No. 2, French Camp 

NESHOBA COUNTY. '■ 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— R. B. Ford 

Second District. — J. D. Parker. . . 

Third District. — A. E. Harboar. ., __ - 

Fourth District. — A. W. Williamson . 

Fifth District.— V. H. Fryery 



1126 . COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J . C. Harrison -,__ 

W. H. Gipson ..__ 

Felix W. Tingle 

Second District. — T. J. Jackson 

J. R. Roundtree i-^ 

Third District.— ]. U. Moore 

G. W. Sanell 

, Fourth District. — Sam Huston 

W. L. Gilbert-- 

H. Lee Tolbert.. __ 

Fifth District. — R. M. Jones 1 

W. G. Snow 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — N. M. Williamson ._ 

Second District. — D.W.Brantley 

- - Third District. — W. G. Hester 

Fourth District. — W. A. Milling.-."- 

Fifth District.— ]. H. Melton 

' NEWTON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. H. Keith Decatur 

Second District. — J. M. Rivers Decatur 

Third District. — T. B. Pace^ Conehatta 

Fourth District. — M. W. Carr -_ Newton 

Fifth District. — C. A. McGee-__ Hickory 

. ". JUSTICE OF PEACE. ,, 

First District. — W. D. Watson Decatur 

B.Perkins Decatur j 

C Second District. — J no. W. Dorm an Union I 

|. / Jas. M. Williams _. Battlefield j 

f:^ Third District . — D. E. Vance Lucern j 

T. P. Williams Conehatta 

Fourth District. — L. W. McCain Lawrence 

C. H. Doolittle Newton 

Fifth District. — LeRoy Dease Hickory 

J. M. Edwards Chunky 

CONST.'X.BLES. 

• Second District. — J. T. Herrington •_ Union ^ 

Third District. — J.W.Wayne Conehatta 

Fourth District. — J. S. Hardy . 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1127 

NOXUBEE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Allie Swann. R. F. D. No. 2, Macon 

Second Dirtrict. — Jas. E. Sparkman Cooksville 

Third District. — Cy. G. Thompson Macon 

Fourth District. — J. B.' McNeese Shuq^iakik 

Fifth District.— Leland Hines R. F. D. No. 1, Macon 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — W. M. Dowdle Clifton ville 

Thos. Stevens R. F. D. No. 2. Macon 

Second District. — Jesse R. Sparkman Cooksville 

H. T. MeLeod . McLeod 

J. L. Wilkerson Paulette 

.Third District. — Jas. L, Clemens Macon 

Wood Cockrell ^ Macon 

Fourth District. — J no. E. Barrage Shuqualak 

T.H.Otis R. F. D., Feams Springs 

C. P. Triplett '.Mashula ville 

Fifth District.—] . K. Triplett R. F. D. , Brooksville 

J. B. Cotton R. F. D., Brooksville 

W. A. Parks Brooksville 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— W. H. Wyatt. . Prairie Point 

Second District. — E. C. Goodwin Paulette 

Third District. — Sam M. Bowen Macon 

Fourth District. — A. Watkins Shuqualak ~ 

V. O. Triplett Mashulavill j 

J. W. Hailey Gholson i 

Fifth District.—]. D. Hardin .Brooksville 4 

P. W. Boykin R. F. D., Brooksville \ 

F.H.Cotton R. F. D., Brooksville 



OKTIBBEHA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — R. A. Lampkin Starkville 

Second District. — A. H. Montgomery ^ Osbom 

Third District. — Lee Nichols Maben 

Fourth District. — C. S. Fondren Sturgis 

Fifth District.— D. W. Outlaw, Jr Starkville 



1128 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. * 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — W. H . Reynolds Starkville 

D. W. Outlaw, Sr Starkville 

Second District. — G. G. Thompson Hickory Grove 

Third District.— D. T. Pab'ner Maben 

N. M. M' ora Maben 

Fourth District. — T. F Sar ders Bradley 

L. r. Peterson Sturgis 

Fifth District.— B. G. Hairell ._ Sessums 

'ONSTABLES. 

First District. — A. W. Welch Starkville 

Third District. — J. T. Davis '. Maben 

Fourth District. — J. H. McKinzie Sturges 

Fifth District. — J. S. Spraggins Sessums 



PANOLA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. W. Wooten Como 

Second District. — R. L. Thornton Longtown 

Third District. — J. K. Glenn Courtland 

Fourth District. — A. P. Chapman * Eureka 

Fifth District. — W. T. Burkhalter Sardis 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— W . E. Taylor Como 

J. W. Soweli: :___R. F. D., Sardis 

Second District. — G. R. Samuels .Delta 

W. H. Barham Crenshaw 

Third District. — J. W. Simmons R. F. D. No. 2, Batesville 

H. E. Robertson Pope 

Fourth District.— n. W. Burns R. F. D. No. 1, Pope 

W. H. Dunlap Terza 

Fifth District. — J. L. Brewton Sardis 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — S. T. Jennings Como 

Second District. — B. S. Woollard Pleasant Grove 

Third District. — G. W. Randolph . Courtland 

Fourth District. — C. L. Collier . Reynolds 

Fifth District.— Z. W. Dugger Batesville 

S. E. Elmore ' 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1129 

PEARL RIVER COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— N. F. Clark Poplarville 

Second District. — Parish Ladner ^- Hillsdale 

Third District.— 1. S. Kirkland . _Kirk 

Fourth District. — G. W. Amacker Chinquepin 

Fifth District.— U. D. Tate McNeill 

JUSTICE OP PEACE. 

Ftrst District.— S. C. Smith Poplarville 

D. F. Archer Poplarville 

Second District. — Simon Hutchings Lumberton 

W. R. Landrum Elder 

Fourth District. — J. F. Lee Chinquepin 

H. H. Wheat Wheat 

Fifth District— 'Ka.ys Hinton McNeill 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — John S. McGehee Poplarville 

Second District. — D, A. Landrum z Elder 

Fourth District. — James H. Wheat Wheat 

Fifth District.— T. J. Stewart McNeill 



PERRY COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — E. Small Wingate 

Second District. — G. D. Draughn Brown 

Third District.— ] . T. Newell, Jr Richton 

Fourth District. — J . H. Overstreet Beaumont 

Fifth District.— J. P. Smith Janice 

• JUSTICE OP PEACE. 

First District. — H. S. Brown New Augusta 

J. W. Morren New Augusta 

Second District. — G. W. Pitman 

Third District.— C. C. Smith Richton 

W. J. Jefcoat- Richton 

Fourth District. — J. L. Davis Beaumont 

CONSTABLE. 

Third District. — G. R. Dunham 



1130 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

PIKE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — W. J. Fortinberry Smithburg 

Second District. — J. L. Yarborough China Grove 

Third District.— A. D. McGuffie Sartinsville 

Fourth District. — John W. Gatlin '_-McComb 

Fifth District. — Van . F. Coney Magnolia 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. H. Rimes Holmesville 

Jesse C. Simmons Smithburg 

■ W. H. McDaniel ._. Sala 

Second District. — H. H. Rushing Sartinsville 

E. Y. Howell Felder 

Third District.— C. W. Hinson Tylertown 

Jesse C. Luter Melis 

Fourth District. — J. Dock. Harrell McComb 

J. H. Jones Summit 

Fifth District.— T . M^Lard Magnolia 

W. L. Walker Magnolia 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — B. F. Simmons Leggett 

Second District. — T. J. Futch Tylertown 

Third District. — J . C. Thompson Raibom 

Fourth District. — E. E. Blount _ .McComb 

Fifth District. — Joet J. Coney Magnolia 

PONTOTOC COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — A. D. Tucker. Sherman 

Second District. — C. F. Gilmore Thaxton 

Third District. — J . M . Douglass ". Randolph 

Fourth District. — I. N. Knox Pontotoc 

Fifth District.— ]. W. Campbell Troy 

JUSTICE OP PE.J^CE. 

First District. — B. M. Cochran : Sherman. 

D. T. Pitts R. F. D. No. 1. Blue Springs 

Second District. — J. W. Cummings Ecru 

J. W. Spears Esperanza 

Third District. — C. M. Swain _ _ Toccopola 

W. F. Jones.. 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1131 

• 

Fourth District. — W. N . Johnson Pontotoc 

Will King Pontotoc 

Fifth District. — A. A. Atkins Shannon 

R. N. Price 1 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. T. Litter Blue Springs 

Second District. — L. W. Matkins Thaxton 

Third District. — J . R. Cannon • Randolph 

Fourth District. — J. F. Wooten. Pontotoc 

Fifth District. — J. L. Henderson, Jr R. F. D. No. 1, Pontotoc 

PRENTISS COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First Dirtsict. — L. P. Reynolds Booneville 

Second District. — B. F. Michaels Booneville 

Third District.— ]. T. Miller Wheeler 

Fourth District. — J . S. Sumners Marietta 

Fifth District. — J . A. Smith Burtons 

T 
• • JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — I. C. Grishann Booneville 

' G.W.Collins Booneville ■ 

Second District. — J. W. Hicks R. F. D., Booneville \ 

J. M. Taylor .__. R. F. D., Booneville i 

Third District. — W. Y. Mullinix Baldwyn - 

John Carmack Wheeler 

Fourth District. — H. Morgan Elma 

W\ P. Fatten Marietta 

Fifth District.— ^\ B . Pollard Booneville 

T. A. Shackelford Burtons 

. . CONSTABLES. 

First District. — D. F. Fulghura ^ Booneville 

Second District. — Frank Windom Booneville 

Third District.—]. W. Weatherby Wheeler 

Fourth District. — J . T. Sparks Newsite 

Fifth District. — W. A. Burcham R. F. D., Booneville 

. QUITMAN COUNTY. 

= ■ - SUPERVIS017S. 

'First District.—]. M. Wliatley _ Birdie 

Second District. — G. W. Barnett Sabino 

Third District. — S. M. Marks Marks 

FoiirtJi District.—]. H. Jennings-. Vance 

Fifth District. — J . T. Croftord Lambert 



1132 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. ^ 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — C/P. Norman 

Second District. — J. E. Wood Belen 

R. F. Bailey------- 

Third District. — J. D. Edwards Marks 

R. B. Sims Hinchcliff 

Fourth District. — J. P. Henderson 

Fifth District.— A. T. Collins Lambert 

J. C. Fitzpatrick -Lambert 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— W . P. Sanford 

Second District. — J. E. Davis Belen 

Third District. — Jack Garner Hinchcliff 

Fourth District.—]. C. Dicky R. F. D. No. 1, Lyon 

Fifth District. — J . W. McDonald Lambert 

RANKIN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — P. B. Berry Florence 

Second District. — R. D. McRae Brandon 

Third District. — G. W. Dinson___ Pisgah 

Fourth District. — R. E. Night Lodabon 

Fifth District. — N. H. Nash - _^ Dobson 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Jno, F. Williams Florence 

J. L. McDonald Whites 

Second District. — C. O. Rouse ._ Longford 

Wm. Corley Brandon 

Third District. — W. B. Smith Famine 

J. S. Davis Sand Hill 

Fourth District. — Geo. Robinson Pelahatchie 

A. P. White . Light 

Fifth District. — J. L. Bass Dobson 

W. D. Thomas Thomasville 

W. H. Watters Rufus 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— T. E. Therrell Florence 

Second District. — T. T. Cottrell Brandon 

A. T. Miller 

Third District. — J. L Holmes Pisgah 

Fourth Disirict. — J. D. Robbins Light 

R. L. Hunter 

Fifth District.—]. A. Lewis Thomasville 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1133 

SCOTT COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First Districl. — VV. D. Harkey Harperville 

Second District. — L. C. Xoblin Homewood 

Third District.— jas.G. RisherJ R. F. D. No. 1. Morton 

Fourth District.— R. O. Rigley R. F. D. No. 1, Beach 

Fifth District.— T. J. Walters R. F. D. No. 1, Forest 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — L. T. Sessums Hillsboro 

W. J. Hamilton 

Second District. — R, V. Evans . Lake 

Fourth District. — J. B. Shearman R. F. D. No. 1, Lena 

W. T. Duncan Beach 

O. F. Champion Forkville 

Fifth District. — W. P. Loper Damascus 

A. J. Myers „ Lake 

CONSTABLE. 

Fourth District. — N. A. Register -- 



SHARKEY COUNTY. 

.SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Jno. Ross Lucre 

Second District. — S. J. Clark Cary 

Third District.— Geo. C. Cortright Rolling Fork 

Fourth District. — E. W. Cook Anguilla 

Fifth District. —S. S. Miller Anguilla 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

Third District. — Jno. W. Baggett Rolling Fork 

Frederick Graft Rolling Fork 

Fourth District. — J. H. SimmoriS Anguilla 

F. O. Stevens Anguilla 

Fifth District.— T, H. Price Catchings 

- .. J. A. McDaniel - - - ,.. 

CONSTABLE. 

Fourth District. — Shelly Anderson 



1134 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



SIMPSON COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — A. J. Brown Rials 

Second District. — A. D. Kennedy Coat 

Third District.— F. P. Berry D'Lo 

Fourth District. — Geo. W. Williams Bush 

Fifth District.— L. W. Murray Pearl 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — I. W. Upton Mendenhall 

L. P. Bishop Magee 

Second District. — A. J. Runnels Cyclone 

Sol. H. Brown Magee 

Third District.— W . T. Lee Shivers 

Geo. W.Jones D'Lo 

H. L. Hampton Pinola 

Fourth District. — J. L. Dickerson Pokal 

J. C. Taylor Ina 

Fifth District.— E. W. Mahaffy Pearl 

W. D. Mahaffy .Harrisville 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. -^]ohn Magee Mendenhall 

D. W. Duckworth Magee 

Second District. — J. W. Runnels Coat 

A. J. Herrington Coat 

Third District.— T. E. Coke Westville 

Willis Womack D'Lo 

D. W, Benson Shivers 

Fourth District. — Melvin Little : Pokal 

T. G. Richardson Ina 

Fifth District. — J. B. Moore Harris\'ille 

N. R. Parker Ruby 

SMITH COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.—]. C. Ward Raleigh 

Second District. — J. B. Butler Taylorsville 

Third District. — L. M. McAlpin Mize 

Fourth District.— C. S. Neal Polkville 

Fifth District.—]. S. Brown Klein 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. E. Thornton Sandpoint 

J. M. R. Adams Sylvarena 

H. A. Thompson Gunn 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1135 

Second District. — G. W. Anderson Taylorsville 

I. J. Jackson Taylorsville 

Third District. — M. A. Sullivan Mize 

T. M. Gibson Mize 

R. L. Martin. __-.__ 

Fourth District.— U. M. Troxler Polkville 

N . Swigert Trenton 

Fifth District. — N. W. Westbrooks Lemon 

C. E. Richey 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. M. Tullos ._ Raleigh 

B. F. Huff Sylvarena 

Second District. — M. P. Windham 

J. F. Stringer . 

Third District. — Mark Sullivan Mize 

J. C. Hester Mize 

C. F. Hopkins Polkville 

Fourth District. — W. R. Echels 

C. A. Langford 

Fifth District. — J. H. Hedgwood __ 

SUNFLOWER COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — W. M. Mclnnis 

Second District. — W. E. Stevenson 

Third District.—]. W. Corder 

Fourth District. — D. O. Ringold 

Fifth District. — W. A. Ricketts 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Jasper Ford ^" 

W. T. Cook . 

Second District. — J. L. Centers. 

J. W. Renshaw 

Third District.— \Y. J. Holt 

P. F. P. Herring 

T. S. Causey 

Fourth District. — D. W. Boyer 

J. W. Powell 

G. J. Missinger 

Fifth District. — Jas. Stigler ^- 

Leonard Hiter 

CONSTABLE. 

Fourth District. — S. C. Johnson 



1136 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

TALLAHATCHIE COUNTY. 

•» SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — G. P. Newman Enid 

Second District. — J. T. Cole Charleston 

Third District.— ^l. Hey - Cascilla 

Fourth District. — A. M. Graham Glendora 

Fifth District. — W. N. Tate ^ Sumner 

JUSTICE OF PEACE, 

First District.— C. A. Hall Teasdale 

W. C. Kiihue . 

Second District. — C. W. Manley Charleston 

S. W. Noble Pattison 

Third District. — C. F. AIcKnight Rosebloom 

R. W. Stevens 

Fourth District. — B. F. Saunders 

Fifth District.— "^^ . C. Sullivan Webb 

H. B. Flautt Sumner 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. M. Bridgers Teasdale 

Second District. — J. W. Tapley S. Charleston 

Third District, — G. W. Rounseville - Cascilla 

TATE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — S. B. Gann Strayhom 

Second District. — T. P. McGaha Arkabutla 

'Third District. — A. Y. Gillispie Coldwater 

Fourth District. — J. L. Boyd Senatobia 

Fifth District. — W. B. Poag Barr 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — ^[. F. Moore Locust 

E. L. Pace Strayhom 

Second District. — A. R. Osteen Murry 

J. N. Gregory Arkabutla 

Third District. — S. D. Wooten Coldwater 

M. A. McKinnon Coldwater 

J. W. Clark Coldwater 

Fourth District. — C. P. Vamer Senatobia 

W. T. Clark Looxahoma 

Fifth District.— K. A. EotT . Tyro 

W. S. Wilburn ...Thyatira 

H. W. McKinnon Independence 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 1137 

CONSTABLES. 

First District.— C. U. Pickle Locust 

Second District. — Charlie Hatcher Arkabutla 

Third District. — L. E. Henderson R. F. D. No. 1, Cold water 

J. E. Stevens 

Fourth District. — John Whalen Senatobia 

Fifth District. — W. R. Johnson .__' Independence 

H. L. Emerson . -_ 

J. H. Blackwell 

TIPPAH COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. S. Wilson Chalybeate 

Second District. — J . D . Lindsay Faulkner 

Third District. — J . A. Griffin Clarysville 

Fourth District. — W. E. Wallace Dumas 

Fiph District. — W. C. Waldron Falkner 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — H. H. Rainey.. Walnut 

T. J. Walker Chalybeate 

Second District. — S. W. Pegiam Ripley 

B. F. Walker Falkner 

Third District. — A. S. Johnston Blue Mountain 

R. S. Gondy .Blue Mountain 

Fourth District. — J. A. Anderson .Mitchell 

Nat. Clark Dumas 

Fifth District.—]. B. Smith Ripley 

W. M. Childs Ripley 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — J. H. Skinner Chalybeate 

Second District. — C. W. Jones Falkner 

Third District. — J. E. Ratliff Cotton Plant 

Fourth District. — J. J. Shackleford Dumas 

Fifth District. — Geo. Smith Ripley 

TISHOMINGO COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — L. P. Bonds luka 

Second District. — Joe Marias Bums ville 

Third District.—]. F. Oaks ._..Iuka 

Fourth District. — J. R. Bickerstaff Burnt Mills 

Fifth District. — J. D. Mann. _ _ Mann 



1138 • COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First Dtstrict. — T. J. Davis luka 

D. L. Anderson luka 

Second District. — D. L. Wood Burasville 

J. S. Woodley Bumsville 

Third District.— Charles Edmondson luka 

G. C. Stevens luka 

Fourth District. — S. A. Trimm Burnt Mills 

Richard Floyd Burnt Mills 

Fifth District. — J. C. Miller Dennis 

A. G. W. Byram Dennis 

CONSTABLES. 

First Dtstrict. — C. R. Akers luka 

Second District. — Mose Johnson Bumsville 

Third District.— T. U. Sanders . 

Fourth District. — Mack Fleming Burnt Mills 

Fifth District. — Carter Shook . Dennis 



TUNICA COUNTY. ^ 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — W. E. Cox Clacks 

Second District. — P. M. Houston Tunica 

Fourth District. — W. P. Eads _. Crews 

Fifth District.— ¥. W. Cannon, Sr _ _ _Dubbs 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. ' 

First District. — J. P. Hogan , Commerce 

J. H. Smith Commerce 

Second District. — W, W. Hickey Tunica 

S. J, Herrin Hollywood 

Fourth District. — Norman Burnett State Levee 

Jno. D. Tucker Dundee 

Fifth District. — Geo. W. Worley Maud 

B. L. Lake Maud 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Marion Head Robinson ville 

Second District. — A. M. Smart 

Fourth District. — Alex, France Dundee 

Fifth District.—] M. Watson.. _ Dubbs 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. ^1139 

UNION COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District.— C. A. Baker R. F. D., Myrtle 

Second District. — J no. M. Beasly R. F. D., New Albany 

Third District. — Luther M. McAllister R. F. D., New Albany 

Fourth District.— S. M. Roberts R. F. D., Blue Springs 

Fifth District.— D. F. Smith R. F. D., Blue Springs 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District.— W. I. Handcock R. F. D., Myrtle 

E. H. Lamar R. F. D., Etta 

Second District. — S. J. Holmes Ingomar 

C. S. Robertson Myrtle 

Third District.— A. H. Raggett New Albany 

C. L. Martin. New Albany 

Fourth District. — N. Bridges Blue Springs 

J. R. Haynie Blue Springs 

Fifth District.— W.J. Robbins.. __R. F. D. No. 3, Blue Springs 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Floy Johnson Myrtle 

Second District. — Lenox Williams Ingomar 

Third District. — Marvin Hall New Albany 

Fourth District. — John Roberts Blue Springs 

Fifth District.— R. H. White R. F. D.. Bethany 



WARREN COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Frank Guscio _ Vicksburg 

Second District. — Jno. H. Adams Vicksburg 

Third District. — D. G. Good rum Vicksburg 

Fourth District. — J. A. Brown Bovina 

Fifth District.—^. E. Griffin Oak Ridge 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — F. C. Henderson Vicksburg 

W. A. Murch -Vicksburg 

W. S. Hanisee Vicksburg 

Second District. — Jno. McGillicuddy Vicksburg 

E. Lee Vicksburg 

D. Muirhead Bnmswick 

Third District.— ] . M. Hullum... _..Yokena 

G. H. Simrall Yokena 

A. B. Couvillon Brierfield 



1140 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. ^ 

Fourth District. — F. W. Beaumann ^.- Bovina 

W. E. Lanier Bovina 

Fifth Distnct.—T. J. McKay Oak Ridge 

Jno. R. Pettway Oak Ridge 

' CONSTABLES. 

First District. — L. A Straley Vicksburg 

C. H. Stites.l Vicksburg 

J. V. Hamilton Vicksburg 

Second District. — Dan Jones Vicksburg 

W. W. Nesmith Vicksburg 

Fourth District. — F. B. Lanier 

Fifth District.—]. H. Shiller _- 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

Firs. District.— T. S. Redd __.- 

Second District. — L. J. Parnell 

Third District. — Herman Wilczinski 

Fourth District. — J. E. Branton 

Fifth District.— L. C. Hays 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Sam Worthington .'._' 

R. J. E. Barwick ___. 

Second District. — A. M. Hyman 

Third District.— n. H. O'Bannon 

J. K. Hamblen 

Dan McLean.^ 

Fourth District. — S. B . Weems 

F. H. Ivy 

Fifth District.— Wm. Wood.. 

W. O. Twonage 

J. C. Hutson 

CONSTABLE. 

Third District. — W. H. Drummond 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — A. E. Douglass State Line 

Second District. — Dr. J. F. Pou Waynesboro 

Third District. — J. M. Ketler Hiwannee 

Fourth District. — -T. H. Leggett Eucutta 

Fifth District.— R. V Bradley R. F D. No. 1. Whistler 



COUNTY GOVKRNMEN'T, 1141 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — J. A. Williams Chicora 

J. B. Johnston Chicora 

Second District. — T. F. George Waynesboro 

W. W. Jordan Denham 

Third District. — J. W. Allen Matherville 

Thomas Collins . Chaparral 

Fourth District. — Lee West R. F. D. No. 1, Waynesboro 

J. W. Sellers Whistler 

Fifth District. — J. W. Singleterry Clara 

W. M. Cochran Clara 

CONSTABLES. 

Second District. — E. D. Pittman 

Third District. — J. M. Doherty 

Fourth District. — Isaiah West R. F. D. No. 1, Waynesboro 

Fifth District. — J . M. Harrison Waynesboro 

WEBSTER COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J. W. Nolen Eupora ' ■ 

Second District. — J. F. Watson Embry ;^ 

Third District. — E. A. C. Mobley Stewart ; 

Fourth District. — W. M. Stallings Maben I 

Fifth District. — J. T. Jennings HohenHnden | 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — S. B. Hood Montevista 

H. M. Skelton R. F. D., Eupora 

Second District. — H. O. Oswalt Embry 

J. S. Bradford Redding 

Third District. — N. G. McGar Tom Nolen 

J. M, Patridge Dabney 

Fourth District. — J. W. Graham : Sopa 

E. M. Polk Sopa 

Fifth District. — J. G. Vaughn Hohenlinden 

N. H. Williams Cumberland 

CONSTABLES, 

First District.^]. W. McDowell - Walthall 

Second District.~V^\ T. Putnam ...Cadaretta 

Third District.~G. A . Tackett Eupora 

Fourth District. — C. C. Crowley R. F. D.. Maben 

Fifth District. — J. Connor Hohenlinden 



1142 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. • 

WILKINSON COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — Wm. V. Morris Woodville 

Second District. — Evans S. Wall Pond 

Third District. — W. L. Jenkins Centreville 

Fourth District. — I. A. Carter Wilkinson 

Fifth District. — W. F. Johnson Perrytown 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — E. H. Lewis Woodville 

Second District. — Frank T. Stewart Fort Adams 

Third District. — W. D. Anderson.. Centreville 

Thos. White . Centreville 

Fifth District.— U. W. Day > Rosetta 

Jno. A. Ray Rosetta 

CONSTABLES. 

First District. — Matthew Van Allen Whitehead Woodville 

Third District. — Walter C. Killroy ._ Centreville 

Fifth District. — Lawrence Haynes 

WINSTON COUNTY. 



SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — J . H . O verstreet Louisville 

Second District. — J. T. Barnes Feams Springs 

Third District.—]. T. White . Beth Eden 

Fourth District. — W. E. Dempsey Louis\^lle 

Fifth District.— L. H. Hopkins Plattsbiirg 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District — J. H. Watson Louisville 

. L. Filer Noxapater 

S. O. Green Sturgis j 

Second District. — T. S. Foster Feams Springs | 

J. D. Hill Feams Springs 

J. E. Bamhill Coopwood 

Third District.— F. B. Whites . Beth Eden 

W. D. Wright . Joplin 

Fourth District. — C. H. Hudson Louisville 

J. R. Regan Louisville 

J. T. Ray Louisville 

Fifth District. — Andrew Thrasher Plattsburg 

W. K. Taylor .1 _ _ . Plattsburji 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 



CONSTABLES. 



^143 



First District. — S. C. Chambliss Louisville 

Second District. — Virgil Luke Featns Springs 

Third District. — H. D. Cannon Beth Eden 

Fourth District. — W. J. Taylor Louisville 

Fifth District.—]. J. Brazeale Plattsburg 



YALOBUSHA COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — D. E. Pate 

Second District. — E. F. Gordon 

Third District.— R. D. Allen . - ' 

Fourth District. — W. C. Kuykendall 

Fifth Distirct.—W. R. Howell :_-_ 

JUSTICE OF PEACE. 

First District. — Stewart B. Pipkin 

J. H. Teas - 

Second District. — C. L. Chadwick 

H. A. Goforth 

Third District. — R. J. Davis 

W. T. Berry 

Fourth District. — G . F. Kuykendall . 

J. B. Massey 

John Tribble- 

Fifth District. — W. G. Vickery 

J. S. Vanhoozer 

P. A, Horton 

1 

CONSTABLES. j 

■j 

First District. — G. V. Boswell/. 

Second District. — W. M. Raley 

H. R. Sanders 

Third District.— M. K. Richards 

Fourth District.—"^". W. Baker . 

Fifth District. — A. C. Denley 



1144 COUNTY GOVERNMENT. 

YAZOO COUNTY. 

SUPERVISORS. 

First District. — H. C. Bonney 

Second District. — S. J . Dixon 

Third District.— B . E. Keror 

Fourth District. — N . L. Smith 

Fifth District.— R. W. Lumbley 



JUSTICE OF PEACE. 



First District. — D. F. Roberts 

E. S. Bell 

Second District. — G, V. Warren 

J. D. Henderson. 

Third District.— C. M. Moore 

W. J. Yoyster 

Fourth District.— S. W. Leach 

J. A. Waters 

J. M. Jenkins 

Fifth District.— R. A. Parker 

H. R. Foss 

C. C. Coleman 



CONSTABLES. 



. First District, — John Sibley 

Second District. — T. P. Prestedge. 

Third District.— ]. D. Russell 

Fourth District.—]. C. Shepherd.. 

E. O. Clark 

Fifth District. — Smith McConnelL 






X 



AX '^N J"" 

f fM 






v 





A 



THE COTTON PLANT. 



PART VIII. 



Organic Acts and Laws of Mississippi Territory. 
Outline of the Constitutions and Lists of Members of 

the Constitutional Conventions of 1817, 1832, 1869. 
Fourth Constitution of Mississippi, adopted November 

I, 1890. 
Members of Constitution of 1890. 



ORGANIC ACT OF MISSISSIPPI. 



An Act to Establish the Territorial Government of Mississippi. {Passed 

April 7, 1798.) 

g. Sect. III. All that tract of country bounded on the west by the 
Mississippi ; on the north by a line to be drawn due east from the month cf 
the Yasous to theChatahouchee River; on the ea^t by the river Chatahou- 
chee; and on the south by the thirty-first degree of north latitude, shall be, 
and hereby is constituted one district, to be called the Mississippi Territory; 
And the President of the United States is hereby authorized to establish 
therein a government in all respects similar to that now exercised in the j 

territory northwest of the river Ohio, excepting and excluding the last ; 

article of the ordinance made for the government thereof by the late Con- ^ 

gress, on the thirteenth day of July, one thousand seven hundred and .1 

eighty-seven, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to j 

appoint all the necessary officers therein, who shall respectively receive 
the same compensations for their services; to be paid in the same manner 
as by law established for similar officers in the territory northwest of tlie 
river Ohio; and the powers, duties and emoluments of a superintendent of 
Indian affairs for the southern department, shall be united with those of 
governor: Pravided, always, That if the President of the United States 
should find it most expedient to estabHsh this government in the recess 
of Congress, he shall nevertheless have full power to appoint and commis- 
sion all officers herein authorized; and their commissions shall continue in 
force until the end of the session of Congress next ensuing the establish- 
ment of the government. 

10. Sect. IV. The territory hereby constituted one district for the 
purposes of government may, at the discretion of Congress, be hereafter 
divided into two districts, with separate territorial governments in each, 
similar to that established by this act. 

11. Sect. V. The establishment of this government shall in no 
respect impair the right of the State of Georgia, or of any person or 
persons, either to the jurisdiction or the soil of the said territory, but the 
rights and claims of the said State and all persons interested are hereby 
declared to be as firm and available as if this act had never been made. 

12. Sect. VI. From and after the establishment of the said govern- 
ment, the people of the aforesaid territory shall be entitled to and enjoy 
all and singular the rights, privileges and advantages granted to the 
people of the territory of the United States, northwest of the river Ohio, 
in and by the aforesaid ordinance of the thirteenth day of July, in the 
year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, in as full and ample 

(1147) 



1148 ~ ORGANIC ACT OF MISSISSIPPI. 

a manner as the same are possessed and enjoyed by the people of the 
said last mentioned territory. 

13. Sect. VIL From and after the estaVjlishment of the aforesaid 
government it shall not be lawful for any person or persons to import 
or bring into the said Mississippi Territory, from any port or place without 
the limits of the United States, or to cause or procure to be so imported or 
brought, or knowingly to aid or assist in so importing or bringing any 
slave or slaves, and every person so offending, and being thereof convicted 
before any court within the said territory, having competent jurisdiction, 
shall forfeit and pay, for each and every slave so imported or brought, the 
sum of three hundred dollars ; one moiety for the use of the United States, 
and the other moiety for the use of any person or persons who shall sue 
for the same; and every' slave so imported or brought shall, thereupon, 
become entitled to and receive his or her freedom. 

14. Sect. VIII. The sum qf ten thousand dollars shall be, and 
hereby is appropriated, for the purpose of enabling the President of the 
United States to carry into effect the provisions of this act; and the said 
sum shall be paid out of any monies in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated. 



: >7 



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f'AC SIMILE OF FIRST PAGE OF FIRST LAW OF MISSISSl I'I'I TERRITORY. WITH 
SIC.NATURHS OF GOVERNOR AND TERRITORIAL JUDGES. 



FIRST LAW OF THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY. 



The Act of April 7, 1798, creating the Mississippi Territory, provided 
for the appointment of a Governor, Secretary, a Court with common law 
jurisdiction, to consist of three Judges and other civil officers; it provided 
that the Governor and three Judges, or a majority of them, should "adopt 
and publish in the district such laws of the original States, civil and crim- 
inal, as may be necessary and best suited to the circumstances;" to report 
them to Congress from time to time, the same to be in full force until dis- 
approved by Congress or altered by a Territorial Assembly. By virtue 
of that law President Adams appointed Winthrop Sargent Governor of the 
Territory, John Steel Secretary, and Peter Bryan Bruin, Daniel Tilton 
and William McGuire Judges. 

No laws were promulgated during 1798 because Judge McGuire and 
Judge Tilton had not reached the Territory. The first law promulgated 
in the Mississippi Territory bears date of February 28, 1799, and is signed 
by Winthrop Sargent, Peter Bryan Bruin and Daniel Tilton. There is an 
impression arising from statements in Claiborne's History of Mississippi 
that Judge Bruin did not sign the Sargent laws about which there was so 
much protest. 

The administration of Governor Sargent seems to have been marked 
by continual controversy arising out of the laws passed by the Governor 
and Territorial Judges. The protest against the first Territorial laws so 
passed finally culminated in a Congressional investigation, which resulted 
in many of the laws being revoked. 

The objections to the Sargent laws mainly urged were that the laws 
were made in violation of the ordinance of 1787; that the punishment for 
the crime of treason was in violation of the Constitution of the United 
States, that a fee of eight dollars was charged for a marriage license, and 
that certain fees were fixed as perquisites of the Governor without author- 
ity of law. It was charged that the laws were chiefly copied, not from 
the laws existing in the old States, but from a code of laws prepared by 
Governor Sargent when he was Secretary of the Northwest Territory, 
and it was charged also that General St. Clair had condemned the laws 
when submitted to him as Governor of that Territory. Only one of the 
Judges appointed by President Adams was a lawyer, hence it was not 
strange that the first code of laws should have been somewhat faulty and 
defective. Judge McGuire was a lawyer, but he did not arrive in the 
Territory until about April. 1799, and many of the most objectionable 
laws had been promulgated at that time.- Judge Bruin and Judge Tilton 
were good men, but they seemed to know little about the science of law. 

Since the creation of the Department of Archives and Histor\- of the 
State of Mississippi these original manuscript laws have been discovered 

(1150) 



M 



FIRST LAW OF THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY. 1161 

and are now on file in the Department. The manuscripts are in a good 
state of preservation and the great seal of the Territory is perfectly pre- 
served thereon. 

In a letter from Governor William C. C. Claiborne to Secretary Madi- 
son, dated December 20, 1801, the following interesting estimate in which 
the court was held is given. The Governor writes: 

"The Legislature is engaged in a new judiciary system. The manner 
in which the superior and inferior courts have heretofore been arranged is 
generally condemned. There is certainly room for improvement. One 
half, perhaps more, have no confidence in the Judges. The Legislature 
participates in this feeling, and will, I fear, be inclined to legislate more 
against men than principles. 

"It is an unpleasant state of things, and will be for me the source of 
much trouble, A late decision made by the Superior Court of this Terri- 
tory has occasioned much complaint, and aroused the sympathies of the J 
Legislature. Subsequent to the ratification of the treaty between the 1 
United States and Spain, and shortly before this district was evacuated, 1 
the Spanish Governor granted to certain of his favorites much valuable ^ 
land, and to evade objections these grants purported to have been made | 
previous to the treaty. | 

"In some few cases these fraudulent grants were made of lands which ; 

had been previously granted in good faith. And in case of this kind where j 

suit had been instituted, the holder of the fraudulent grant (which falsely j 

bore date older than the bona fide grant) obtained recovery. In the In- j 

ferior courts where the suit commenced parole testimony was admitted to j 

invalidate and antedated grant, and the defendant had a verdict. But 1 

upon appeal to the higher court parole testimony was declared inadmis- j 

sible, and the judgment below was reversed. This case is generally con- \ 

sidered a very hard one, and the Legislature, to afford a remedy, contem- i 

plated a law authorizing the admission of parole testimony, but upon my j 

intimating that, for the present, I could not assent to such a measure, i 

it was dropped. A statute for admission of parole testimony to disprove ; 

and invalidate a record would be a grave innovation upon the law of .< 

evidence. Yet I can see no other way by which these frauds can be set 1 

aside, unless indeed, as I think, a Court of Chancery would reach the case. * 

And most of the lawyers here think it would not. I shall be happy to | 

have your opinion in the matter."* 



*Joumal of Governor Claiborne. Vol. I., pp. 31, 32, 33. 



FIRST LAW OF THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY. 



A Law in Aid of and in Addition to the Regulations of the Governor for 

the Permanent Establishment of the Militia of the Mississippi Terri- 
tory. 

All free male inhabitants between the age of sixteen and fifty, the offi- 
cers of civil government appointed by the President and Senate of the 
United States, or commissioned by the Governor, ministers of religious' 
societies, that are or may be established, and regularly educated practicing 
physicians, only excepted, shall be liable to, and perform military duty, 
and be divided agreeably to the order of the commander-in-chief into 
corps of horse and foot, and formed in the following manner: 

Sixty-four rank and file shall form a company of infantry or riflemen, 
or a troop of horte. 

To each company of infantry or riflemen there should be appointed a 
captain, lieutenant, and ensign, four sergeants, four corporals, a drummer 
and a fifer. 

To a troop of horse, one captain, one lieutenant, and one comet, four 
sergeants, four corporals and one trumpeter. 

The whole mihtia of the Territory shall, until the commander-in-chief 
may otherwise direct, be formed into two legions, and bear the name of 
the coiinties to which they shall respectively appertain, so soon as such 
shall be erected and laid off. 

A Heutenant-colonel shall command each legion, and there may be 
appointed such other field officers as the commander-in-chief may deem 
necessary. 

There shall also be appointed to each legion an adjutant and a quarter- 
master, and whenever the commander-in-chief shall believe it essential to 
the well ordering of the militia of this Territory, he may appoint an 
adjutant-general, with the rank of a major or lieutenant -colonel. 

Each and every horseman shall furnish himself with a sword, one 
pistol, twelve rounds of cartridges, three flints, a priming wire, small 
portmanteau, and such other arms and accoutrements as the commander- 
in-chief may direct. 

Every militia man who is enrolled for service on foot, shall furnish 
himself with a musket and bayonet, cartridge box and thirty rounds of 
cartridges, or rifle and tomahawk, powder horn and bullet pouch, with 
one pound of powder and four pounds of bullets, six flints, priming wires, 
brushes and knapsacks. 

And every person enrolled in this militia who shall be fotmd deficient 
upon any muster day, in the arms, ammunition and accoutrements, or any 
of them, herein ordered to be furnished, shall, after a reasonable time 

(1152) 



■f ru.^d. 



FIRST LAW OP THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY. « 1153 

given in the judgment of the legionary commandants (not exceeding six 
months) to enable him to procure the same, at each and every time of 
default be fined the sum of three dollars. 

The officers shall be armed and accoutred as the privates, with the 
addition of swords only for the infantry. 

Upon' the second Saturday of each and every month officers com- 
manding companies are to assemble and parade their men at such time and 
place as they may deem best adapted for their general convenience, and 
there diligently exercise them for the space of two hours, in marching, 
wheeling, firing with good aim, and the use of the bayonets for the 
infantry. 

There shall be four field days in each and every year, to be named 
by the commander-in-chief, or the commandants of legions under his 
order, upon which the respective commands that can in his judgment, 
with any convenience be assem.bled, must be exercised as legionary corps. 

K any person enrolled in the militia shall refuse or neglect to appear 
upon the regular stated muster or field days, after being informed by a 
commissioned or non-commissioned officer of the time and place of 
parade, or shall refuse to do his duty when appearing, he shall be fined 
in the sum of three dollars for each default, except in case of absence 
and when he shall render a sufficient excuse to his captain. 

If any commissioned, non-commissioned officer or private shall cause 
or promote any disorder upon the regular stated muster or field days, so 
as to impede or prevent the military exercises which may be ordered, he 
shall be tried by a court martial, and upon conviction thereof shall be 
fined in a sum not exceeding ten dollars. 

All fines are to be collected by a warrant of distress from the captain 
or senior officer of a company, directed to any one of the sergeants, who 
is to levy upon the goods or chattels of the defaulter, and after advertising 
the same for five days, if the fine is not then paid, he shall proceed to 
sell at public vendue to the highest bidder so much of the effects as will 
answer the fine, and one dollar for his own use, returning the overplus, 
if any there be, to the party who owned the property so destrained, and 
the fine levied shall by the officer from whom the warrant issued be paid 
into the county treasury for the use of the legions, and to be appropriated 
in such way and manner as the field officers, or a majority of them, shall 
direct, wdth the approbation of the commander-in-chief. 

Upon any invasion of tliis Territory, or the appearance thereof, or 
domestic disturbances actually existing or apprehended, the commander- 
in-chief, or commandants of counties, in pressing emergencies where the 
commander-in-chief cannot seasonably be resorted to, are authorized to 
make such detachments for guards, patrols and other military duty as the 
public exigencies may in his or their opinion require (provided that in 
all cases where detachments are ordered by commandants of legions, 
report thereof shall be made without delay to the commander-in-chief, 
and in case of refusal to appear and perform duty under such authority, or 

disobedience or neglect of orders in time of service, the defaulter shall 
37 



1154 FIRST LAW OF THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORY. 

be deemed guilty of cowardice, and be heard, tried and sentenced by a 
court martial. 

All officers shall be attentive to the forming, disciplining, parading and 
commanding their respective corps, and to such other duties as shall 
■respectively bind them by this law, and by the orders from time to time 
to be given by the commander-in-chief or other of their superior officers. 

If any officer shall be guilty of a breach of this law, or in any respect 
violate or neglect his duty he shall be heard, tried and sentenced by a 
court martial. 

A court martial shall not consist of more than nine members, nor less 
than three, whereof one at least shall have rank superior to a lieutenant. 

Courts martial may be appointed b}?- the commander-in-chief or the 
commandants of legions, but the commander-in-chief only shall have the 
power of approving and carrying into effect sentences of courts martial 
whereby the punishment shall be capital or an officer cashiered; and the 
commander-in-chief is authorized and. empowered to remit fines that may 
be inflicted, w^here it shall appear from the oaths of two credible witnesses 
that the person fined is unable to pay the same without great distress to 
himself or family. 

The free male inhabitants above the age of fifty shall arm and accoutre 
themselves either as cavalry, or those who serve on foot (at their own 
option), but they shall not be liable to military service except in cases 
of actual invasion and under the immediate direction of the commander- 
in chief. 

The foregoing is hereby declared to be a law of the Mississippi Terri- 
tory, this twenty-eighth day of February, Anno Domini one thousand 
seven hundred and ninety-nine. In testimony of which we have under- 
signed our names and caused the public seal to be thereunto affixed. 

WiNTHROP Sargent, 
Peter Bryan Bruin, 
Daniel Tilton. 



ACT AUTHORIZING A STATE GOVERNMENT. 



(Passed March 1, 1817.) 

§ I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, That the inhabitants of 
the western part of the Mississippi Territory be, and they hereby ore, 
authorized to form for themselves a constitution and state government, 
and to assume such name as they shall deem proper; and the said State, 
when formed, shall be admitted into the Union upon the same footing 
with the original states, in all respects whatever. 

2. The said State shall consist of all the territory included within the 
following boundaries, to wit: Beginning on the river Mississippi at the 
point where the southern boundary line of the State of Tennessee strikes 
the same, thence east along the said boundary line to the Tennessee River, 
thence up the same to the mouth of Bear Creek, thence by a direct line 
to the northv/est comer of the country of Washington, thence due south 
to the Gulf of Mexico, thence westwardly, including all the islands within 
six leagues of the shore, to the most eastern junction of Pearl River with 
Lake Borgne, thence up said river to the thirty-first degree of north lati- 
tude, thence west along the said degree of latitude to the Mississippi River, 
thence up the same to the beginning. 

3. All free whitQ male citizens of the United States, who shall have 
arrived at the age of twenty-one years, and resided within the said Terri- 
tory at least one year previous to the time of holding the election, and 
shall have paid a county or territorial tax, and all persons having in other 
respects the legal quaHfications to vote for Representatives in the General 
Assembly of the said Territory, be and they are hereby, authorized to 
choose Representatives to form a convention, who shall be apportioned 
among the several counties within the said territory, as follows, to wit: 
from the county of Warren, two Representatives; from the county of 
Claiborne, four Representatives; from the county of Jefferson, four Rep- 
resentatives; from the coiinty of Adams, eight Representatives; from the 
coimty of Franklin, two Representatives; from the county of Wilkinson, 
six Representatives; from the county of Amite, six Representatives; from 
the cotinty of Pike, four Representatives; from the county of Lawrence, 
two Representatives; from the county of Marion, two Representatives; 
from the county of Hancock, two Representatives; from the county of 
Wayne, two Representatives; from the county of Greene, two Represent- 
atives; from the county of Jackson, two Representatives; and the election 
of the Representatives aforesaid shall be holden on the first Monday and 
Tuesday in June next, throughout the several counties above mentioned 

(1155) 



:q:M 



1156 ACT AUTHORIZING A STATE GOVERNMENT. 

and shall be conducted in the same manner as is prescribed by the laws • 
of said Territory, regulating elections therein for members of the House 
of Representatives. 

• 4. The members of the convention, thus duly elected, be, and they here- 
by are, authorized to meet at the town of Washington, on the first Monday 
of July next; which convention, when met, shall first determine, by a 
majority of the whole number elected, whether it be or be not expedient, 
'at that time, to form a constitution and State government for the people 
within the said Territory; and if it be determined to be expedient, the con- 
vention shall be, and hereby are, authorized to form a constitution and 
State government ; Provided, That the same, when formed, shall be Repub- 
lican, and not repugnant to the principles of the ordinance of the thirteenth 
of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, between the people 
and states "of the territory northwest of the river Ohio, so far as the same 
has been extended to the said territory by the articles of agreement 
between the United States and the State of Georgia, or of the Constitution 
of the United States; And, provided also, That the said convention shall 
provide, by an ordinance irrevocable without the consent of the United 
States, that the people inhabiting the said Territory do agree and declare 
that they forever disclaim all right or title to the waste or unappropriated 
lands lying within the said Territory, and that the same shall be and remain 
at the sole and entire disposition of the United States ; and, moreover, that 
each and every tract of land sold by Congress shall be and remain exempt 
from any tax laid by the order, or under the authority, of the State, 
whether for State, county, township, parish or any other purpose what- 
ever, for the term of five years, from and after the respective days of the 
sales thereof, and that the lands belonging to citizens of the United States, 
residing without the said State, shall never be taxed higher than the lands 
belonging to persons residing therein; and that no taxes shall be imposed 
on lands the property of the United States; and that the river Mississippi, 
and the navigable rivers and waters leading into the same, or into the Gulf 
of Mexico, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the 
inhabitants of the said State as to other citizens of the United States 
without any tax, duty, impost, or toll therefor, imposed by the said State. 

5. Five per cent of the net proceeds of the lands lying within the said 
Territory, and which shall be sold by Congress from and after the first day 
of December next, after deducting all expenses incident to the same, shall 
be reserved for making public roads and canals; of which three-fifths shall 
be applied to those objects within the said State, underthe direction of the 
Legislature thereof, and two-fifths to the making of a road or roads lead- 
ing to the said State, under the direction of Congress; Provided, That the 
application of such proceeds shall not be made imtil after payment is com- 
pleted of the one million two hundred and fifty thousand dollars due to the 
State of Georgia, in consideration of the cession to the United States, nor 
until the payment of all the stock which has been or shall be created' by 
the'act entitled "An act providing for the indemnification of certain claim- 
ants of public lands in the Mississippi Territory," shall be completed; 



ACT AUTHORIZING A STATE GOVERNMENT. 1167 

And provided also, That the said five per cent shall not be calculated on 
any part of such proceeds as shall be applied to the payment of the one mil- 
lion two hundred and fifty thousand dollars due to the State of Georgia, in 
consideration of the cession to the United States, or in payment of the 
stock which has or shall be created by the act, entitled "An act providing 
for the indenmification of certain claimants of public lands in the Missis- 
sippi Territory." 

6. Until the next general census shall be taken, the said State shall be 
entitled to one representative in the House of Representatives of the 
United States. 




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FAC SIMILE OF FIRST PAGE OF FIRST CONSTiTUTIO^^ OF MISSISSIPPI 



OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF 1817. 



The supreme executive power is vested in a Governor, who is elected 
by qualified electors for a term of two years. It is provided that the 
Governor shall be thirty years of age, a citizen of the United States for 
twenty years, a resident of the State for five years, and be seized in his 
own right of a freehold estate of six hundred acres of land, or of real estate 
to the value of two thousand dollars. 

The Lieutenant-Governor shall possess the same qualifications as the 
Governor, and be chosen by the same electors, in the same manner and at 
the same time and for the same term. 

The Secretary of State, Attorney-General, Treasurer and Auditor of 
Public Accounts are elected by the Legislature on joint ballot, the Secre- 
tary of State for a term of two years, the Attorney-General, Auditor and 
Treasurer for a term of one year. 

The legislative power is vested in two distinct branches, the one to be 
styled the Senate, the other the House of Representatives, and both 
together "The General Assembly of the State of Mississippi." 

The Representatives are elected annually on the first Monday and the 
day following in August. It is provided that a Representative shall be a 
citizen of the United States, an inhabitant of the State for two years, 
twenty-two years of age, owner of two hundred and fifty acres of land 
within the State, or have an interest in real estate of the value of five 
hundred dollars. 

The Senators are chosen for a term of three years, and on convening 
after the first election shall be divided by lot into three classes, as nearly 
equal as possible. The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be 
vacated at the expiration of the first year; of the second class at the 
expiration of the second year, and of the third class at the expiration of 
the third year, so that one-third may be annually chosen thereafter. 

It is provided that a Senator shall be a citizen of the United States, 
an inhabitant of the State for four years, twenty-six years of age, and 
hold, in his own right, within the State, three hundred acres of land, or 
an interest in real estate of the value of one thousand dollars. 

It is provided that the General Assembly shall hold its first session on 
the first Monday in October, 1S17, at the City of Natchez, and thereafter 
at such place as may be directed by law, and thereafter on the first Mon- 
day in November. 

The judicial power is vested in one Supreme Court, consisting of not 
less than four, nor more than eight, judges, elected by the General Assem- 
bly, to serve during good behavior, up to sixty-five years of age, in a 

(1150) 



9 ■, :-: i' 



o:,< 



1160 OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF 1817. 

superior court held in each county at least twice in each year, the judges 
being the same as the judges of the Supreme Court. 

It is provided that the judge whose decision is under consideration in 
the Supreme Court shall not constitute one of the court for the consid- 
eration of that case. 

Provision is also made for the establishment of a Court or Courts of 
Chancery, Courts of Probate and Justice Covirts. 

Every free white male of the age of twenty-one years or upwards, who 
shall be a citizen of the United States, and shall have resided in the State 
one year next preceding an election, and the last six months within the 
county, city or town in which he offers to vote, and shall be enrolled in 
the militia thereof, except exempted by law^ from military service; or 
having the aforesaid qualifications of citizenship and residence, shall 
have paid a State or county tax shall be deemed a qualified elector. 



M'^' 



f MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1817. 



Adams County — David Holmes, President; Josiah Simpson, James C. 

Wilkins, John Taylor, Joseph Sessions, John Steele, Christopher 

Rankin, Edward Turner. 
Amite County — Henry Hanna, Thomas Batchelor, John Burton, Thomas 

Torrance, Angus Wilkinson, William Lattimore. 
Claiborne County— ^^X alter Leake, Thomas Barnes, Daniel Burnet, Joshua 

G. Clarke. 
Franklin County — James Knox, John Shaw. 
Greene County — Laughlin McKay, John McRae. 
Hancock County — Xoel-Jourdan, Amos Burnet. 
Jackson County — ^John McLeod, Thomas Bilbo. 

Jefferson County — Cowles Mead, H.J. Balch, Joseph E. Davis, Cato West. 
Lawrence County — Harmon Rimnels, George W. King. 
Marion County — John Ford, Dougal McLaughlin, 

Pike County — David Dickson, William J. Minton, James Y. McNabb. 
Warren County — Henry D. Downs, Andrew Glass. 
Wayne County — ^James Patton, Clinch Gray. 
Wilkinson County— Oeorge Poindexter, Daniel Williams, Abram M. Scott, 

John Joor, G. C. Brandon, Joseph Johnson. 

LouisJWiNSTON, Secretary. 






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FAC SIMILE OF SIGNATURES OF MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1817. 



OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF 1832. 



The chief executive power is vested in a Governor who is chosen by- 
the quaUfied electors for two years, and cannot hold the office more than 
four years in any term of six years. The Secretary of State, Treasurer, 
and Auditor of Public Accounts are chosen by electors for a term of two 
years, the Attorney-General for a term of four years. 

The legislative power is vested in a Senate and House of Representa- 
tives, both together being styled "The Legislature of Mississippi." The 
Representatives are chosen every two years, on the first Monday in 
November and the day following; their number not to be less than thirty- 
six, nor more than one hundred. 

The Senators are chosen for foiir years, one-half being elected bien- 
nially, at the same time with the Governor and Representatives, and 
their number cannot be less than one-fourth, nor more than one-third 
of the whole number of the Representatives. 

The Legislature meets every two years at the town of Jackson (which 
is established as the seat of government till X850) at such time as may 
be prescribed by law. It provides that the first Legislature under the 
new Constitution shall be held the third Monday in November, 1833. 

The judicial power is vested in a High Court of Errors and Appeals, 
held at least tv/ice a year, consisting of three judges chosen by the electors 
for the term of six years, one being elected in each of the three districts 
into which the State is divided, and one of the three judges being chosen 
biennially; in a Circuit Court held in each county at least twice in each 
year, the judges being chosen by the electors of each Judicial District, 
and holding their office four years; in a Superior Court of Chancery, the 
Chancellor being chosen by the electors of whole State for a term of six 
years; in a Court of Probate, the judges being elected by the electors of 
each county for the term of two years; and a Board of Police for each 
county, consisting of four members, elected for a term of two years. 

The Constitution provides that no person shall ever be appointed or 
elected to any office in the State for life or during good behavior. 

Every free white male person of the age of twenty-one years or 
upwards, who shall be a citizen of the United States, and shall have 
resided in the State one year next preceding an election, and the last 
four months within the county, city, or town, in which he offers to vote, 
is a qualified elector. 

It is provided that all elections shall be held by ballot. 



(1163) 



MEMBERS OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF I832. 



P. RuTiLius R. Pray, of Hancock, President. 

Adams County — John A. Quitman, Spence M. Grayson, Stephen Duncan. 

Amite County — Richard Hurst, Isaiah Cain. 

Claiborne County — Thomas Freeland, Thomas Gale, Daniel Greenleaf, 

Copiah County — Seth Granberry, WilHam P. Rose. 

Covington County — Frederick Pope. 

Franklin County — Daniel McMillan. 

Greene County — David McRae. 

Hinds County — David Dickson, James Scott, Vernon C. Hicks. 

Hancock County — P. Rutilius R. Pray. 

Jefferson County — Putman T. Williams, Cicero Jefferson. 

Jackson County — William C. Seamon. 

Jones County — Nathaniel Jones. 

Lawrence County — ^Aloysius M. Keegan, Joseph W. Pendleton. 

Lowndes County — ^James F. Trotter. 

Marion County — Dugald McLaughlin. • - 

Monroe County — George Higgason. 

Perry Ccnmty — ^Jacob J. H. Morris. 

Pike County — ^James Y. McNabb, Laban Bacot. 

Rankin County— Nsithan G. Howard. 

Simpson County — ^John B. Lowe. 

Warren County — ^William J. Redd. 

Washington County — Andrew Knox. 
'Wayne County — Thomas P. Falconer. 

Wilkinson County — Gerard C. Brandon, Edward F. Farish, Joseph John- 
son. 

Yazoo County — Howel W. Runnels, Richard F. Floyd. 

From the District composed of the Counties of Yazoo and Madison — Wil- 
liam G. Austin. 

From the District composed of the Counties of Monroe, Lowndes and Ran- 
kin — Daniel W. Wright. 

District composed of the Counties of Monroe and Washington — Eugene 
Magee. 

District composed of the Counties of Copiah and Jefferson — Benjamin 
Kennedy. 

District composed of the Counties of Amite and Franklin — Richard A. 
Stewart. 

District composed of the Counties of Lawrence, Simpson and Covington — 
Charles Lynch. 

District composed of the Counties of Jones, Perry, Greene, Hancock, Jack- 
son and Wayne — ^John Black. 

District composed of the Counties of Pike and Marion — James Jones. 

John H. Mallory, Secretary. 
(1164) 



,)■ .1 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE CONSTITUTIONAL 
CONVENTION OF 1861. 



William S. Barry, Lowndes County, President. 

F. A. Pope. Holmes County, "Secretary. 

W. Ivy Westbrook, Noxubee County, Sergeaxt-at-Arms. 

Adams County— ^A. K. Farrar, J. Winchester. 
Attala County — E. H. Sanders, J. W. Wood. 
Amite County — D. W. Hurst. 
Bolivar County — M. H. McGehee. 
Carroll County — J. Z. George, W. Booth. 
Claiborne County — H. T. Ellett. 
Coahoma County — J. L. Alcorn. 
Copiah County — P. C. Catching, Benj. King. 

Clarke County — S. H. Terral. ' "^ 

'Choctaw County — W. F. Brantley, W. H. Witty, J. H. Edwards. 
Chickasaw County — J. A. Orr, C. B. Baldwin. 
Covington County — A. C. Powell. 

Calhoun County — W. A. Sumner, M. D. L. Stephens. 
DeSoto County — J. R. Chalmers, S. D. Johnston, T. Lewers. 
Franklin County — D. H. Parker. 
Greene County — T. J. Roberts. 

Hinds County — Wiley P. Harris, W. P. Anderson. W. B. Smart. 
Holmes County — J. M. Dyer, W. L. Keim. 
Harrison County — D. C. Glenn. 
Hancock Cmmty — J. B. Deason. 
Issaquena County — A. C. Gibson. 
Itaw.amba County— K. O. Beene, A. B. Bullard, W. H. H. Tison M. C. 

Cummings. 
Jasper County — O. C. Dease. 
Jackson County — A. E. Lewis. 
Jefferson County — J. S. Johnston. 
Jones County — ^J. H. Powell. 
Kemper County— O. Y. Neely, T. H. Woods. 
Lawrence County — W. Green. 
Loumdes County — W. S. Barry, G. R. Cla>^on. 
Leake County — W. B. Colbert. 
Lauderdale County — J. B. Ramsey, F. C. Semms. 
Lafayette County — L. Q. C. Lamar, T. D. Isom. 

(1165) 



11G6 OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OP l8t)l. 

Marshall County — A. M. Clayton, J. W. Clapp, Samuel Benton, H. W 

Walter. W. M. Lea. 
Madison County — A. P. Hill. 
Monroe County — S. J. Gholson, F. M. Rogers. 
Marion County — H. Mayson. 
Noxubee County — Israel Welsh. 
Neshoba County — D. M. Backstrom. 
Newton County — M. M. Keith. 
Oktibbeha County — ^T. C. Bookter. < 

Perry County — P. J. Myers. 
Pike Cotinty — ^J. N. Nelson.- 
Panola County — ^J. B. Fiser, E. F. McGehee. 
Pontotoc County — C. D. Fontaine, J. B. Herring, H. R. Miller, R. W. 

Floumoy. 
Rankin County — ^J. J. Thornton, W. Denson. 
Sunflower County — E. P. Jones. 
Simpson County — W. J. Douglas. 
Smith County — W. Thompson. 
Scott County — C. W. Taylor. 
Tallahatchie County — A. Patterson. 
Tishomingo Caiinty — A. E. Reynolds, W. W. Bonds, T. P. Young, J. A. 

Blair. 
Tunica County — A. Miller. 

Tippah County — O. Davis, J. H. Berry, J. S. Davis, D. B. Wright. 
Washington Cminty — ^J. S. Yerger. 
Wilkinson County — A. C. Holt. 
Wayne County — W. J. Eckford. 
Warren County — Walker Brooke, T. A. Marshall, 
Winsto^i County — J. Kennedy, W. S. Boiling. 
Yalobusha County — F. M. Aldridge, W. R. Barksdale. 
Yazoo County — H. Vaughn, G. B. Wilkinson. 



:^::- 



OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF I869. 



The chief executive power is vested in a Governor, who is elected by 
the quaHfied electors of the State for the term of four years, and who 
shall be at least tliirty years of age, and shall have been a citizen of the 
United States for twenty years, and shall have resided in the State two 
years next preceding the day of his election. 

The Lieutenant-Governor is elected at the same time, in the same man- 
ner, and for the same term, and shall possess the same qualifications as 
the Governor. 

The Secretary of State, Treasurer, Auditor of PubUc x\ccounts, Attor- 
ney-General and Superintendent of Education are elected by the qualified 
electors for a term of four years. Provision is made for a Commissioner 
of Immigration and Agriculture, to be elected by the Legislature on joint 
ballot, for a term of four years. 

The legislative power is vested in the Legislature, which shall consist 
of a Senate and House of Representatives. The Representatives are 
elected every two years, and the Senators every four years. 

The poUtical year begins on the first Monday of January, and the 
Legislature meets annually on the first Tuesday after the first Monday 
in January. 

The judicial power is vested in a Supreme Court, consisting of three 
judges appointed by the Governor, by and with the advice and consent 
of the Senate. It is provided that the Governor shall appoint one judge 
for each district into which the State is divided, and that the term of 
office shall be nine years. Circuit Courts are estabhshed, the judges being 
appointed by the Governor for the term of six years. Chancery Courts 
are also provided, the Chancellors being appointed in the same manner 
as the Circuit Judges for a term of four years. 

Circuit Courts are to be held in each county at least twice a year, 
and Chancery Court at least four times in each year. 

Each county is provided with a Board of Supervisors of five persons, 
to be elected by the electors for a term of two years, and with a compe- 
tent number of Justices of the Peace to be elected in the same manner 
for the same time. 

All male inhabitants of this State, except idiots and insane persons, 
and Indians not taxed, citizens of the United States, or naturalized, 
twenty-one years old and upwards, who have resided in the State six 
months and in the county one month next preceding the day of the 
election, at which said inliabitant offers to vote, and who are duly regis- 
tered, according to the requirements of Section 3, and who are not dis- 
qualified by reason of any crime, are declared to be qualified electors. 

(1167) 



MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVEN I ION OF 1868. 



B. B. Eggleston of Lowndes County, President. 

Adams — Edward J. Castillo, Henry P. Jacobs (Negro), Frederick Parsons. 

Amite — Charles P. Neilson. 

Attala — ^Jason Niles, S. C. Cooley. 

Bolivar — ^Jehiel Railsback. ' 

Calhotin- — J. H. Kerr. 

Carroll — George Stovall, Stephen Johnson, William L. Hemmingway. 

Chickasaw — A. J. Jamison, E. R. Smith. 

Coahoma — A. S. Dowd. 

Choctaw and OktibbeJia — Nicholas B. Bridges, James Weir, Geo. H. Hol- 
land. 

Claiborne — Matthew T. Newsom (Negro), Edward H. Stiles. 

Clarke — H. Musgrove. 

Covington and Simpson — Carlos Chapman. 

Copiah — E. G. Pe^'ton, Emanuel Handy (Negro). ' 

Davis and Smith — ^V. A. Collins. 

DeSoto — Horatio N. Ballard, W^m. B. Gray, Wm. D. Nesbitt. 

Franklin — C. W. Beam. 

Greene, Perry and Jackson — John Moody.- 

Hancock and Marion — Alanson Goss. 

Harrison — (Election invalid — new election ordered). 

Hinds — Henry Mayson (Negro), E. A. Peyton, Charles Caldwell (Negro), 
John R. Parsons. 

Holmes— R. W. Barry, D. McA. WilHams. 

Holmes and Madison — (Delegate at large, R. H. Montgomery). 

Issaquena — Henry P. Toy. 

Itawamba — John Elliott. 

Jasper — Wm. McKnight. 

Jefferson — A. Alderson, O. S. Miles. 

Kemper — Jere Hauser. 

Lafayette — W. G. Vaughan, P. H. McCutchen. 

Lee—^. W. Gaither, D. T. Walker. 

Lauderdale — R. C. Merryman, J. Aaron XToore (f^^e'gro). 

Lawrence — Wesley Lawson (Negro). 

Leake — Henry W. Warren. 

Lowndes — B. B. Eggleston, Joseph W. Field, Isham G. Rainey, Geo. Van 
Hook. «^- 

Madison — W. Ben Cunningham, Amos Drane (Negro). 

(1168) 



MEMBERS OF CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION OF 1868. 1169 

Marshall — ^John W. C. Watson, Wm. M. Compton, Chas. H. Townsend. 

Monroe — ^J. B. Woodmansee, James L. Herbert, James Elliott. 

Neshoba — Wm. A. Hutto. 

Newton — ^J. E. Longmire. 

Noxubee — S. H. Powell, Isham Stewart (Negro), N. J. Chappell. 

Panola — A. R. Howe, U. Ozanne. 

Pike — Peres Bonney. 

Pontotoc — Thomas W. Jones. 

Rankin — Cyrus Myers (Negro), John C. Brinson (Negro). 
; Scott — Moses H. Lack. 

Sunflower — David N. Quinn. 

Tallahatchie — S. C. Barnes. 

Tunica — ^John M. Phillips. 

Tippah— '^m. Nelms, W. T. Stricklin. 

Tishomingo — H. Mask, Terry Dalton. 
I Warren— A. Mygatt, C. McKee, B. Leas, T. W. Stringer (Negro), A. 

.^ Johnson (Negro). j 

Washington — ^John Fawn, Doctor Stites (Negro), Wm. T. Combash j 

(Negro). j 

Wayne — WiHiam Yeoman. I 

Wilkinson — Wm. H. Gibbs, Chas. W. Fitzhugh (Negro). 

Winston — ^Jared Richardson. 

Yalobusha — Robert J. Alcorn, W. J. Lilley. 

Yazoo — Chas. W. Clarke, Wm. Leonard (Negro), A. T. Morgan. 
T. P. Sears of Adams County, Secretary. 



% 



OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF 1890. 



The chief executive power is vested in a Governor elected by the qual- 
ified electors of the State, who shall hold his office for four years, and who 
shall be ineligible as his immediate successor in office. The Lieutenant- 
Governor is elected at the same time, in the same manner, and for the 
same term, and shall possess the same qualifications as required of the 
Governor. The Secretary of State, Treasurer, Auditor of Public Accounts, 
Attorney-General and Superintendent of Education are elected for a term 
of four years by the qualified electors. 

The Auditor of Public Accounts and the Treasurer are ineligible to 
immediately succeed themselves or each other in office. 

The legislative power is vested in the Legislatiire, which consists of a 
Senate and a House of Representatives The Representatives are elected 
every four years by the qualified electors of the several counties and repre- 
sentative districts. The Senators are elected for four years at the same 
time and in the same manner as the Representatives. 

It is provided that the Legislature shall meet at the seat of govern- 
ment, in regular session, on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in 
January of the year 1892, and every four years thereafter, and in special 
session on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January, 1894, and 
every four years thereafter, unless sooner convened by the Governor; that 
the special session shall not continue longer than thirty days, unless the 
Governor, deeming the public interest to require it, shall extend the sitting 
by proclamation in writing to be sent to and entered upon the journals of 
each House for a specified number of days, and then it may continue in 
session to the expiration of that time. It is provided that none but appro- 
priation and revenue bills shall be considered at special sessions, except 
such other matters as may be acted upon at an extraordinary session called 
by the Governor. 

The judicial power is vested in a Supreme Court, consisting of three 
judges appointed by the Governor for a term of nine years. It is pro- 
vided that the Legislature shall divide the State into three Supreme Court 
Districts, and the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, shall appoint one judge for and from each district, but the removal 
of a judge to the State Capital during his term of office shall not render 
him inehgible as his own successor for the district from which he has 
removed. 

It is provided that the office of one of the judges shall be vacated in 
three years, one in six years and one in nine years, so that at the expira- 
tion of every three years one of the judges shall be appointed. 

(1170) 



OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION OF 1890. 1171 

The judicial power is further vested in Circuit and Chancery Courts, 
the Judges and Chancellors being appointed by the Governor for a term 
of four years. 

Each county is divided into five districts, and a resident freeholder 
of each district is elected by the electors to constitute the Board of Super- 
visors of the county, to serve for a term of four years. 

A competent number of Justices of the Peace are to be elected in each 
covmty, for each district, for a term of four years. 

Every male inhabitant of the State, except idiots, insane persons and 
Indians not taxed, who is a citizen of the United States, twenty-one years 
old and upwards, who has resided in this State two years, and one year in 
the election district, or in the incorporated city or town in which he offers 
to vote, and who is duly registered as provided in this article, and who 
has never been convicted of bribery, theft, burglary, arson, obtaining 
money or goods under false pretenses, perjury, forgery, embezzlement, or 
bigamy, and who has paid on or before the tirst day of February, of the 
year in which he shall offer to vote, all taxes which may have been legally 
required of him, and which he has had an opportunity of paying according 
to law, for the two preceding years, and who shall produce to the officers 
holding the election satisfactory evidence that he has paid said taxes, is 
declared to be a qualified elector, but any minister of the gospel in charge 
of an organized church shall be entitled to vote after six months' resi- 
dence in the election district, if otherwise qualified. 

In addition to the foregoing qualifications every elector shall, on and 
after the first day of January, 1892, be able to read any section of the j 

Constitution, or shall be able to understand the same when read to him, 
or give a reasonable interpretation thereof. 



\ 



FOURTH- CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 
Adopted November i, A. D. 1890. 



We, the people of Mississippi in convention assembled, grateful to Al- 
mighty God, and invoking his blessing on our work, do ordain and 
establish this Constitution. 

Ratification of the constitution by the people was unnecessary 
to its validity. Sproule v. Fredericks, 69 Miss., 898 (ii So., 472). 

ARTICLE I. 

DISTRIBUTION OF POWERS. 

Sec. I. The powers of the government of the State of Mississippi 
shall be divided into three distinct departments, and each of them con- 
fided to a separate magistracy, to wit: Those which are legislative to one, 
thoLC which are judicial to another, and those which are executive to 
another. 

(1817, Art. II, Sec. i; 1832, Art. II, Sec. i; 1869, Art. Ill, 
Sec. I.) 

Legislature not authorized to construe laws. Planters Bank 
V. Black, II Smed. & M.. 43; Law^son v. Jeffries, 47 Miss., 686. 
A direction by the Legislature that in estimating damages 
accruing to the owner of land taken for public use the benefits 
} which will result to the owner shall be allowed in extinguishment 

t. of the claim, is judicial, and therefore void. Isom v. Mississippi 

R. R. Co., 36 Miss., 3-c. 

The Governor cannot be compelled by mandamus to perform 
any act. Vicksburg, etc., R. R. Co. v. Lowry, 61 Miss., 102. 

The judiciary are not empowered to grant writs of supersedeas 
to prevent the holding of local option elections. Bond x. State, 
68 Miss., 648 (9 So., 353). 

The courts will not undertake to control the Attorney-General 
in the matter of his official opinions. Woodbury v. McClurg, 
78 Miss., 831 (29 So., 514). 

A suit cannot be maintained against the State for the recovery 
of an award which the Governor has refused to order paid, since 
the offering and payment of rewards for the arrest of escaped 
criminals is intrusted solely to the discretion of the executive. 
State V. Dinkps, 77 Miss., 874 (27 So. 832). 

ai72) 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1173 

« 

The statutes giving the board of supervisors the right to regu- 
late the taking of fish in their respective counties are not violative 
as giving a judicial body legislative authority. Ex parte Fritz, 
86 Miss., 220 (38 So., 722). 

Sec. 2. No person or collection of persons, being one or belonging to 
one of these departments, shall exercise any power properly belonging to 
either of the others. The acceptance of an office in either of said depart- 
ments shall, of itself, and at once, vacate any and all offices held by the 
person so accepting in either of the other departments. 

(181 7, Art. II, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. II, Sec. 2; 1869, Art. Ill, 
Sec. I.) ; 

ARTICLE II. 

BOUNDARIES OF THE STATE. 

Sec. 3. The limits and boundaries of the State of Mississippi are as 
follows, to wit: Beginning on the Mississippi River (meaning thereby 
the center of said river or thread of the stream) where the southern 
boundary line of the State of Tennessee strikes the same, as run by B. 
A. Ludlow, D. W. Connelly, and W. Petrie, commissioners appointed 
for that purpose on the part of the State of Mississippi, A. D. 1837, and 
J. D. Graham and Austin Miller, commissioners appointed for that 
purpose on the part of the State of Tennessee ; thence east along the said 
boundary line of the State of Tennessee to a point on the west bank of 
the Tennessee River, six four-pole chains south of and above the mouth 
of Yellow Creek; thence up the said river to the mouth of Bear Creek; 
thence by a direct line to what w^as formerly the northwest corner of the 
county of Washington, Alabama; thence on a direct line to a point ten , 

miles east of the Pascagoula River on the Gulf of Mexico ; thence west- ] 

wardly, including all the islands within six leagues of the shore, to the j 

most eastern junction of the Pearl River with Lake-Borgne; thence up 
said Pearl River to the thirty-first degree of north latitude ; thence west 
along said degree of latitude to the middle or thread of the stream of the 
Mississippi River ; thence up the middle of the Mississippi River, or thread ' 

of the stream, to the place of beginning, including all islands lying east of 
the thread of the stream of said river, and also including all lands w^hich 
were at any time heretofore a part of the State. \ 

(Preamble, Const. 18 17.) 

For an interesting historical sketch on the subject of the boun- 
daries of the State, by Judges Sharkey, Ellett and William L. 
Harris, see introductory remarks to Chapter II of the Code of 

1857- 

The jurisdiction of the State extends as far out into the sea 
as may be necessary for public safety. Martin v. O'Brien, 34 
Miss., 21. 

Sec. 4. The Legislature shall have power to consent to the acquisition 
of additional territory by the State, and to make the same a part thereof; 



1174 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. • 

ARTICLE III. 

BILL OF RIGHTS. 

and the Legislature may settle disputed boundaries between this State 
and its coterminus states whenever such disputes arise. 

Sec. 5. All political power is vested in, and derived from, the people; 
all government of right originates with the people, is founded upon their 
will only, and is instituted solely for the good of the whole. 
(1817, Art. I, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 6. The people of this State have the inherent, sole, and exclusive 
right to regulate the internal government and police thereof, and to 
alter and abolish their constitution and form of government whenever 
they deem it necessary to their safety and happiness; Provided, Such 
change be not repugnant to the Constitution of the United States. 
(1817, Art. I, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 2.) 
A telegraph company, engaged in domestic as well as interstate 
business, is subject to such reasonable police regulations as the 
State may impose. Telegraph Co. v. Railroad Com., 74 Miss., 

80 (21 So., 15). 

In such a case it is immaterial that the company was chartered 
by another State, and secured its right to erect its lines along the 
post roads in this State under an act of Congress. lb. 

The Legislature can constitutionally confer on municipalities 
the power, by ordinance, to punish as an offense against the 
municipality an act which constitutes a crime against the State. 
Ocean Springs v. Greene, 77 Miss., 472 (27 So., 743). 

Section 4053 of the Code, providing that w^hen a railroad is 
constructed so as to cross a highway, and a bridge is necessary 
for passage along the highway across the railroad, it shall be the 
duty of the railroad company to erect and maintain the bridge, 
is within the police powder of the State. Railroad v. Copiah Co., 

81 Miss., 685 (33 So., 502). 

Section 4058 of the Code, making it the duty, of railroad" 
companies to maintain cattle guards where their tracks pass 
through enclosed land, is within the police power of the State. 
Railroad v. Harrington, 85 Miss., 374 (37 So., 1016). 

Hence the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution of the 
United States is not involved. lb. 

By virtue of the police power, the State has the right to regu- 
late the time, manner and extent of taking of fish in running 
streams and lakes with outlets into other waters. Ex parte 
Fritz, 86 Miss., 220 (38 So., 722). 

Sec. 7. The right to \\-ithdraw from the Federal Union on account of 
any real or supposed grievance, shall never be assumed by this State, nor 
shall any law be passed in derogation of the paramount allegiance of the 
citizens of this State to the government of the United States. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. 20.) 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1175 

Sec. 8. All persons, resident in this State, citizens of the United 
States, are hereby declared citizens of the State of Mississippi. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. i.) 

Sec. 9. The military shall be in strict subordination to the civil power. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. 25.) 

Sec. 10. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying war 
against the same or in adhering to its enemies, giving them aid and 
comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testi- 
mony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open 
court. 

(181 7, Art. VI, Sec. 3; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 3; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 26.) 

Sec. II. The right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition 
the government on any subject shall never be impaired. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. 6.) 

Sec; 12. The right of every citizen to keep and bear arms in defense 
of his home, person, or property, or in aid of the civil power when thereto 
legally summoned, shall not be called in question, but the Legislature 
may regulate or forbid carrying concealed weapons. 



\ 
(181 7, Art. I, Sec. 23; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 23; 1869, Art. I, ] 

Sec. 15.) • -t 



This section does not authorize carrying concealed weapons on 
the person in one's home. Wilson v. State, 81 Miss., 404 (33 
So., 171.) 

Sec. 13. The freedom of speech and of the press shall be held sacred; 
and in all prosecutions for libel the truth may be given in evidence, and 
the jurv shall determine the law and the facts under the direction of the 
court ; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter charged as libelous 
is true, and was published with good motives and for justifiable ends, 
the party shall be acquitted. 

(181 7, Art. I, Sees. 6, 7 and 8; 1832, Art. I, Sees. 6, 7 and S; 
1869, Art. I, Sec. 4.) 

Sec. 14. No person shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property 
except by due process of law. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 10; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 10; 1 8 69, Art. I, Sec. 2.) 

A purchase of land by a deputy sheriff at his principal's sale 
cannot be set aside by motion; so to do would be to deprive of 
property without due process of law. Flournoy v. Smith, 3 
How. (iliss.), 62. 

A law depriving a citizen of his property without notice or 
trial, and without opportunity to protect his rights, is void. 
Donnovan v. Vicksburg, 29 Miss., 247. 

The Legislature cannot declare lands forfeited to the State 
for non-payment of taxes without sale. Grifhn v. Mixon, 38 
Miss., 424. 



1176 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

A judgment without notice is void. Jack v. Thompson, 41 
Miss., 49. 

Personal notice on resident-known defendants is essential to 
a valid judgment against them. Brown v. Levee Commissioners, 
50 Miss., 468. 

An extension of city limits so as to include property and render 
it liable to city taxes, though the owner is not benefited thereby, 
is not to deprive of property without due process of law. Martin 
V. Dix, 52 Miss., 53. 

The Legislature cannot retroactively make valid a void sale of 
land for taxes. Dingy v. Paxton, 60 Miss., T038. 

A municipal ordinance authorizing the killing of unmuzzled 
' - dogs running at large is not invalid. Julienne v. Jackson, 69 

Miss., 34 (10 So., 43). 

The section is not violated by the statute requiring a convey- 
ance of a homestead to be made by a husband and wife jointly. 
Massey v. Womble, 69 Miss., 347 (11 So., 188). 

The Legislature may provide for a resale of tax lands held by it 
although the previous sale to the State was invalid. Marble v. 
Fife, 69 Miss., 596 (13 So., 842). 

The Legislature may authorize the guardian of an infant, or 
person of unsound mind, to agree upon damages to be paid for 
the property of the ward taken for public use. Louisville, etc., 
,Ry. Co. V. Blythe, 69 Miss., 939 (11 So., iii). 

The Legislature cannot provide for the infliction of a penalty 
and its collection by summary process, without a judicial pro- 
ceeding adjudicating the liability. Mc Bride v. State Revenue 
Agent, 70 Miss., 716 (12 So., 699). 

The section of the Code (Code 1906, 1938) providing for the 
filing by a litigant of interrogatories, to be answered by the 
adverse party residing out of the State, the answer to be used as 
evidence, does not deprive the adverse party of due process of 
law. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. Sanford, 75 Miss., 862 (23 
So., 942). 

The decision or judgment remaining undisturbed, the revision 
of an opinion which expresses but the reasons of the decision 
does not involve "due process of law." Adams v. Yazoo, etc., 
R. R. Co., 77 Miss., 194 (24 So., 20c). 
' The Legislature, under the section, is without power to deprive 

a plaintiff of a sum of money admitted to be due him. Memphis, 
etc., Works v. Aberdeen, 77 Miss., 420 (27 So., 608). 

A statute providing for the assessment of railroads for back 
taxes by the State railroad commission, without appeal, does 
not deprive of property without due process of law, although 
other taxpayers may, under general laws, appeal from the 
I tribunal fixing their taxes. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. Adams, 77 

i Miss., 764 (25 So., 355). 

\ 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI.* 1177 

So long as the decision of the supreme court remains undis- 
turbed, any revision of its opinion which sets out merely the 
reasons for the decision, does not deprive the losing party of 
due process of law. Yazoo R. R. Co. v. Adams, 77 Miss., 194 
(24 So., 200). 

Section 4370 of the Code of 1892 (Code 19:6, Sec. 4936), in so 
far as it provides that causes cannot be reversed for jurisdictional 
defects, deprives one of due process of law. Arbuckle v. State, 
80 Miss., 15 (31 So., 437). 

Section 3555 of the Code of 1892 (Code i9?6, Sec. 4^53), though 
applying to railroads constructed before its passage, does not 
infringe this section. Railroad v. Copiah County, 81 Miss., 685 
(33 So., 502). 

Statutes cannot be enacted under this section authorizing 
employes of a corporation to recover when employes of indi- 
viduals, etc., similarly situated cannot. Such statutes must be 
based on some difference inherent in the nature of the business, 
, which difference serves as a basis for and warrants the classifica- 
tion. Ballard v. Oil Co., 81 Miss., 507 (34 So., 533). 

Such statutes cannot be saved where the language applies to 
employes of all corporations, by construing it to apply to corpor- 
ations-engaged in a hazardous business; this is not severence 
between constitutional and unconstitutional provisions, but 
judicial legislation. lb. 

Where a statute contains on its face the boundaries by which 
severance can be made between non-interdependent clauses, the 
court may sever; but the court cannot make such severance by 
construing the act, according to the evidence in each case, as 
falling within or without. lb. 

Chapter 105 of the laws of 1900 cannot be assailed as unconsti- 
tutional because not providing for notice by one who has ap- 
peared and contested a case through all the courts. Quin v. 
State, 82 Miss., 75 {33 So., 839). 

The statute regulating and restricting the capture of creatures 
fercE naturcB not reduced to actual possession is not violative of 
this section. Ex parte Pritz, 86 Miss., 211 {2>?> So., 722). 

Sec. 15. There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in 
this State, otherwise than in the punishment of crime, whereof the party 
shall have been duly convicted. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. 19.) 

Sec. 16. Ex post facto laws, or laws impairing the obligation of con- 
tracts, shall not be passed. 

(181 7, Art. I, Sec. 19; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 19;, iS6q, Art. I, 
Sec. 9.) 

A statute, passed after suit brought but before verdict deny- 
ing cost, not applied. Gayden v. Bates, Walker, 209. 



1178 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Laws regulating interest should not have retroactive opera- 
tion. Eastin v. Van Dorn, Walker, 214. 

An act of incorporation is a contract. Payne v. Baldwin, 3 
Smed. & M., 661 ; Commercial Bank v. State, 6 Smed. & M., 599. 

Act "of 1843, prescribing mode of procedure against banks for 
violations of charters, does not impair the obligation of con- 
tracts. Commercial Bank v. State, 4 Smed. & M., 439. Neville 
V. Bank, 6 Smed. & M., 513. 

A statute requiring banks to pay specie on their obligations 
after a fixed time is valid. Commercial Bank v. State, 6 Smed. 
& M., 599. 

When the State parts with its property, even by donation, the 
property is thereby placed beyond legislative control. Com- 
mercial Bank v. Chambers, 8 Smed. & M., 9. 

Where, by its charter, a municipality is authorized to raise 
money and appropriate it to city purposes, the Legislature can 
divert the m.oney to a different purpose. Board of Education 
V. Aberdeen, 56 Miss., 518, overriding Aberdeen Female College 
V. Aberdeen, 13 Smed. & M., 645, and Aberdeen v. Saunderson, 
8 Smed. & M., 663. 

The salary of an officer is not within the constitutional pro- 
tection. Mississippi v. Smedes, 26 Miss., 47; Hyde' v. State, 
52 Miss., 665. 

The grant of a right to keep a ferry is not a contract. Sullivan 
V. Supervisors, 58 Miss., 790; Seal v. Donnelly, 6o Miss., 658; 
Montjoy v. Pillow, 64 Miss., 705 (2 So., 108). 

The grant of an exclusive privilege to keep a public wharf is 
a contract. Martin v. O'Brien, 34 Miss., 21. 

A statute which prohibits a corporation from assigning 
promissory notes, the charter not expressly conferring the right, 
is valid. Mclntyre v. Ingraham, 35 Miss., 25. 

Dower interest, before death of husband, not within the pro- 
tection of the provision. Magee v. Young, 40 Miss., 164. 

Marriage is not a contract within the meaning of the constitu- 
tion. Magee v. Yoimg, 40 Miss., 164; Carson v. Carson, 40 
Miss., 349. 

To increase exemptions from liability to existing debts is to 
impair the obligation of the contract with the creditor. Lessley 
v. Phipps, 49 Miss., 790; Johnson v. Fletcher, 54 Miss.. 62S. See 
as to statutes affecting remedies Musgrove v. Vicksburg R. R. 
Co., 50 Miss., 677. 

The right granted by a charter to a railroad to fix its tariff of 
freights below a maximum is a contract. Stone v. Yazoo R. R. 
Co., 62 Miss., 607. 

It is not in the power of the Legislature to pass a statute of 
limitations against bonds not due; and where such bonds are 



i 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1179 

payable to bearer it cannot require an affidavit of the holder 
showing a chain of title. Priestly v. Watkins, 62 Miss., 798. 

A statute amending a criminal law which precludes a defense 
available under the former law is, as to crimes committed before 
the amendment, ex post facto; and so is one changing, but not mit- 
igating, the punishment previously prescribed. Lindsey v. 
State, 65 Miss., 542 (5 So., 99). 

The Legislature cannot enlarge the exemptions of property 
from liability to existing creditors; so to do would be to impair 
the obligations of contracts. Rice v. Smith, 72 Miss., 42 (16 
So., 417). 

If two things conjointly constitute a crime and the Legislature 
makes each an offense the latter act can, under the section, 
operate only prospectively. State v. Gillis, 75 Miss., 331 
(24 So., 25). 

A statute providing that juries in capital cases may fix the 

punishment at imprisonment for life in the penitentiary is not 

ex post facto, even in its application to offenses committed before 

. its passage and when the death penalty was fixed by law. 

McGuire v. State, 76 Miss., 504 (25 So., 495). 

A law is not ex post facto which modifies the rigor of the 
criminal law. lb. 

If the Legislature create a board of public improvements and 
levy a tax on land, irrevocably devoting the taxes to the satis- 
faction of the debts which the board was authorized to contract, 
the State cannot by subsequent act, after the debts are con- 
tracted, abate the tax or release the land from liability therefor. 
Forsdick v. Levee Commissioners, 76 Miss., 859 (26 So., 637). 

The owner of land damaged by the taking of the land of 
another is entitled to compensation. Richardson v. Levee 
Commissioners, 77 Miss., 518 (26 So., 963). 

Certain statutes (laws 1875, p. 11; laws 1876, p. '350, and 
laws 1884, p. 182) held void, in whole or in part, as violating 
the obligations of contracts. Woodruff v. State, 77 Miss., 68 
(25 So., 483). 

The provisions of the charter of a railroad company enacted 
before the adoption of the constitution of 1890 authorizing it to 
establish and charge for the transportation of person and 
property within maximum limits prescribed constitute a con- 
tract between the State and the company, the obligations of 
which cannot be impaired. Stone v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co., 
62 Miss., 607; Stone v. Natchez, etc., R. R. Co., 62 Miss., 646; 
Railroad Commission v. Gulf, etc., R. R. Co., 78 Miss., 750 
(29 So., 789). 

Sec. 17. Private property shall not be taken or damaged for public 
use, except on due compensation being first made to the owner or owners 
thereof, in a manner to be prescribed by law; and whenever an attempt 



1180 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 



is made to take private property for a use alleged to be public, the ques- 
tion whether the contemplated use be public shall be a judicial question, 
and, as such, determined without regard to legislative assertion that the 
U'-e is public. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 13; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 13; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 10.) 

Compensation must precede the seizure of the property for 
public uses. Thompson v. Grand Gulf R. R. Co., 3 How, 
(Miss.), 240; Levee Board v. Dancey, 65 Miss., 335 (3 So., 568). 

And the Legislature cannot otherwise provide. Pearson v. 
Johnson, 54 Miss., 259. 

Or limit the time within which the owner may claim compen- 
sation. Levee Board v. Dancey, 65 Miss., 335 (3 So., 568). 

A statute providing for the investiture of the State with title 
^ to land because of non-payment of taxes, without a sale, is void. 
Griffin V. Mixon, 38 Miss., 424. 

The private property meant is property of a specific, fixed, 
and tangible nature, capable of possession and transmission. 
Commissioners v. Withers, 29 Miss., 21. 

The right of eminent domain is an inherent and essential 
element of sovereignty; this is recognized by the constitution 
and limitations placed on it ; the section is not enabling but 
restrictive. Brown v. Beaty, 34 Miss., 227. 

The Legislature cannot provide for the appropriation of private 
property to a mere private enterprise, but it is not essential 
that the enterprise should be exclusively a State undertaking; 
the right of eminent domain may be exercised for the construction 
of railroads. Brown v. Beatty, 34 Miss., 227. 

The compensation must be in money, and cannot be dimin- 
ished by supposed benefits resulting from the improvement. 
Brown v. Beatty, 34 Miss., 227; Isom v. Mississippi R. R. Co., 
36 Miss., 300; Penrice v. Wallace, 37 Miss., 172; New Orleans 
R. R. Co. V. Moye, 39 Miss., 374. 

The power of eminent domain and the power of taxation are 
distinct, and the exercise of the latter is not a taking within this 
provision. Griffin v. Dogan, 48 Miss., 11; Martin v. Dix, 52 
Miss., 53. 

But local assessments, beyond the limits of taxation, is, 
according to what is probably dicta, violative of this provision. 
Macon v. Patty, 57 Miss., 378. 

The Legislature may direct the appointment of commis- 
sioners by the chancery court to estimate damages. New 
Orleans R. R. Co. v. Drake, 60 Miss., 621. 

For measure of damages, see Richardson v. Levee Commis- 
sioners, 68 Miss., 539 (9 So., 351). 

The Legislature may authorize the guardian of an infant, or 
person of unsound mind, to agree upon damages to be paid for 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1181 

the property of the ward taken for public use. . Louisville, etc., 
Ry. Co. V. Blythe, 69 Miss., 939 (11 So., in). 

The section enlarges the previous rule, in that it provides that 
property cannot be damaged (though not taken) for public use 
without diie compensation first made. Alabama, etc., Ry. Co. 
V. Bloom, 71 Miss., 247 (15 So., 72), 

A railroad company cannot escape liability for damages to 
property, not taken, on the ground that they are only such as 
necessarily and naturally arise from the proper management and 
control of its trains. Alabama, etc., Ry. Co. v. Bloom, 71 Miss., 
247 (15 So., 72). 

The section embraces municipalities and prohibits them 
from taking or damaging private property without compensa- 
tion, etc., embracing both direct and consequential damages. 
Vicksburg V. Herman, 72 Miss., 211 (16 So., 434). 

Under the section a county is liable to the owner for damages 
to land which it wrongfully causes to be covered with water by 
the improper construction of a public causeway. Raney v 
Hinds County, 78 Miss., 308 (28 So., 875). 

Constitution, Sec. 17, embraces within its inhibition munici- 
palities; hence, a city, by lowering an established grade, accord- 
ing to which abutting lots have been improved, must compensate 
the owner for all damages sustained thereby. Vicksburg v. 
Herman, 72 Miss., 211 (16 So., 434). 

In such case compensation is not limited to the amount 
necessarily expended, but should include all damages, direct 
and consequential, sustained by the owner. lb. 

This section does not authorize the courts to determine the 
necessity for the taking of property in the exercise of eminent 
domain. Ham v. Levee Board, 83 Miss., 534 (35 So., 943). 

A county is not liable for the negligent or tortious acts of a road 
overseer. Rainey v. County, 79 Miss., 238 (30 So., 636). 

To make it liable the board of supervisors must give such 
directions as make the act of the overseer their act, and mere 
notice of bad condition and failure to repair does not m^ake 
it liable. lb. 

This section applied. Richardson v. Levee Commissioners, 
77 Miss., 518 (26 So., 963). 

Where a municipality closes and vacates an established street, 
it deprives the owner of abutting lots of a right which is prop- 
erty, and which cannot be taken except on due compensation 
being first made as provided in this section. Laurel v. Rowell, 
84 Miss., 435 (36 So., 543). 

A municipality may by legislative authority charge the 
costs of paving a sidewalk as a lien on abutting lots of ditferent 
owners according to the front foot rule, and to do so is not a 



1182 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

taking of private property for public use without compensation. 
Wilzniski v. Greenville, 85 Miss., 393 (37 So., 807). 

A statute regulating and restricting the capture of creatures 
ferce natures, not reduced to actual possession, is not violative 
of this section. Ex jmrte Fritz, 86 Miss., 210 (38 So., 722). 

Sec. 18. No religious test as a qualification for office shall be required; 
and no preference shall be given by law to any religious sect or mode of 
worship; but the free enjoyment of all religious sentiments and the differ- 
ent modes of worship shall be held sacred. The rights hereby secured 
shall not be construed to justify acts of licentiousness injurious to morals 
or dangerous to the peace and safety of the state, or to exclude the Holy 
Bible from use in any public school of this State. 

(1817, Art. I, Sees. 3 and 4; 1832, Art. I, Sees. 3 and 4; 1869, 
Art. I, Sec. 23.) 

Sec. 19. Human life shall not be imperiled by the practice of dueling; 
and any citizen of this State who shall hereafter fight a duel, or assist in 
the same as second, or send, accept, or knowingly carry a challenge 
therefor, whether such an act be done in the State, or out of it, or who 
shall go out of the State to fight a duel, or to assist in the same as second, 
or to send, accept, or carry a challenge, shall be disqualified from holding 
any office under this constitution, and shall be disfranchised. 

(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 2; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 27.) 

Sec. 20. No person shall be elected or appointed to office in this 
State for life or during good behavior, but the term of all offices shall be 
for some specified period. 

(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 12; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 30; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 29.) 

If the Legislature create an office and provide that the officer 
shall hold until his successor is elected, and yet make no provision 
for an election of a successor, the officer will hold until the next 
general election, but no longer. Houston v. Royston, 7 How. 
(Miss.), 543. 

Sec. 21. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus- 
pended, unless when in case of rebellion or invasion, the public safety 
may require it, nor ever without the authority of the Legislature. 

(181 7, Art. I, Sec. 17; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 17; 1869, Art. I, Sec. 3.) 

Sec. 22. No person's life or liberty shall be t\^'ice placed in jeopardy 
for the same offense ; but there must be an actual acquittal or conviction 
on the merits to bar another prosecution. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 13; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 13; 1S69, Art. I, Sec. 5.) 
A conviction or acquittal on an invalid indictment is no bar to 
a second prosecution. Kohlheimer v. State, 39 Miss., 548; 
State v. McGraw, Walker, 208. 

Nor is an acquittal or conviction in a court without jurisdic- 
tion. Montross v. State, 61 Miss., 429. 






FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. « 1183 

A discharge of the jury upon the return of a verdict, in the 
absence of the prisoner while in jail, entitles the defendant to a 
discharge. Finch v. State, 53 Miss., 363. 

The offenses must be identical. Smith v. State, 67 Miss., 
116 (7 So., 208). 

An acquittal under an indictment for murder which does not 
charge an assault and battery is not good in bar of a subsequent 
prosecution for the latter offense. Moore v. State, 59 Miss., 25. 

A conviction of an offense under a municipal ordinance is not 
a bar to a prosecution by the State for same act. Johnson v. 
State, 59 Miss., 543. 

It is not violative of the section for the court, upon a convic- 
tion of an offender, to suspend the sentence except as to costs," 
and at a future term to impose a fine, etc. Gibson v. State, 68 
Miss., 241 (8 So., 329). 

Under the section a prisoner is not entitled to a discharge 
-because after the introduction of evidence one of the jurors was 
reminded that he had been upon the grand jury which found 
the indictment, and, making the fact known, was discharged by 
the court. Roberts v. State, 72 Miss., 728 (18 So,, 481). 

The Legislature can constitutionally confer on municipalities 
the power by ordinance to punish as an offense against the 
municipality an act which constitutes a crime against the State. 
Ocean Springs v. Green, 77 Miss., 472 (27 So., 743). 

Section 141 2 of the Code, providing that the conviction of a 
defendant by a justice of the peace for a misdemeanor shall not 
bar a prosecution for a felony in the same matter, is not violative 
of this section. Huffman v. State, 84 Miss., 479 (36 So., 395). 

Sec. 23. The people shall be secure in their persons, houses, and 
possessions, from unreasonable seizure or search; and no warrant shall 
be issued without probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, 
specially designating the place to be searched and the person or thing 
to be seized. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 9; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 9; 1869, Art. I, Sec. 14.) 

Sec. 24. All courts shall be open; and every person for an injury done 
him in his lands, goods, person, or reputation, shall have remedy by due 
course of law, and right and justice shall be administered without sale, 
denial, or delay. 

(181 7, Art. I, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 14; 1869, Art. I, Sec. 
28.) 

The Legislature cannot take away the right to an appeal after 
it has been exercised. Commercial Bank v. Chambers, 8 Smed. 
&M„9, 

"Due course of law" requires actual notice to known resident 
defendants. Brown v. Levee Commissioners, 50 Miss., 46S. 



1184 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

The Legislature cannot discriminate against a class of persons 
as to incidents of an appeal from the judgment of an inferior 
court. Chicago R. R. Co. v. Moss, 60 Miss., 641. 

A one-year statute of limitations barring actions for the 
recovery of land does not violate the section. Cameron v. 
Louisville, etc., R. R. Co., 69 Miss., 78 (10 So., 554). 

Sec. 25. No person shall be debarred from prosecuting or defending 
any civil cause for or against him or herself, before any tribunal in the 
State, by him or herself, or counsel, or both. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 29; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 29; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 30.) 

The Legislature cannot discriminate against classes of persons 
' as litigants. Chicago R. R. Co. v. Moss, 60 Miss., 641. 

A litigant cannot be excluded from the hearing of the testi- 
mony of other witnesses in the case because he is himself to 
testify; but may be made to testify, if at all, before the other 
witnesses are examined. French v. Sale, 63 Miss., 386. 

. Sec. 26. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have a right to 
be heard by himself or counsel, or both, to demand the nature and cause 
of the accusation, to be confronted by the witnesses against him, to have 
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and, in all prose- 
cutions by indictment or information, a speedy and public trial by an 
impartial jury of the county where the offense was committed; and he 
shall not be compelled to give evidence against himself; but in prosecu- 
tions for rape, adultery, fornication, sodomy or the crime against nature 
the court may, in its discretion, exclude from the courtroom all persons 
except such as are necessary in the conduct of the trial. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 10; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 10; 1869, Art. I, Sec. 7.) 
The Legislature cannot encroach upon the qualification of 
jurors so as to endanger their impartiality. Logan v. State, 50 
Miss., 269. 

The provision as to the nature and cause of the accusation is 
intended to secure to the accused such a specific description of 
the offense as will enable him to make preparation for his trial, 
and also such identification of the oft'ense that he may be insured 
against a subsequent prosecution therefor. Noonan v. State, 1 
Smed. & M., 562 ; Murphy v. State, 24 Miss., 590 ; Girard v. State, 
25 >liss., 469; Riggs V. State, 26 Miss., 51; Norris v. State, 33 
Miss., 373; Newcomb v. State, 37 Miss., 383; WilHams v. State, 
42 Miss., 32S; Riley v. State, 43 Miss., 397; Thompson v. State, 
SI Miss., 353. 

The provision that no person shall be compelled to give evi- 
dence against himself excludes confessions extorted by violence, 
and evidence so obtained cannot be used against the prisoner 
under any circumstances or for any purpose. Jordan v. State 
32 Miss., 382. 



■r" 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1185 

The guaranty of a speedy trial does not preclude the State 
from a reasonable opportunity to examine and prosecute the 
charge. Ex parte Jefferson, 62 Miss., 223. 

It is essential that venue shall be averred and proven. Thomp- 
- son V. State, 51 Miss., 353. 

The right to be heard does not forbid the court's placing 
reasonable limitations of time on argument. Lee v. State, 51 
Miss., 566; Wingo v. State, 62 Miss., 311. 

All evidence, whether of living witnesses or inanimate objects, 
must be produced before the jury in the presence of the accused 
and the court. The Legislature cannot authorize a jury to visit 
the scene of the crime unaccompanied by the accused and the 
court. Foster v. State, 70 Miss., 755. 

The right of a defendant, under the section, to an "impartial 
jury" is not infringed by the statute (Code 1906, Sec. 2685), 
which provides that "any person, otherwise competent, who 
will make oath that he is impartial in the case, shall be compe- 
tent as a juror in any criminal case, notwithstanding the fact that 
he has an impression" or an opinion as to the guilt or innocence of 
the accused, if it appear to the satisfaction of the court that he 
has no bias or feeling or prejudice in the case, and no desire to 
reach any result in it, except that to which the evidence may 
conduct; but any juror shall be excluded if the court be of the 
opinion that he cannot try the case impartially, etc." Green v. 
State, 72 Miss., 52-2. 

The section primarily relates to trials of the guilt or innocence 
of the accused. Whether it relates to hearing of applications 
for continuances, quaere? Lipscomb v. State, 76 Miss., 223. 

One is not an impartial juror within this section who, on his 

^voir dire, conceals facts which make him incompetent; such 

incompetency exists when a juror heard facts from a witness 

whom he believed inducing a fixed opinion. Shepprie v. State, . '\ 

79 Miss., 740 (31 So., 416). j 

Section 1397 of the Code, providing that it shall be sufficient 
in an indictment for perjury to set forth the substance for the 
offense charged, does not dispense with the necessity of averring 
the substance of the issue on the perjury is charged to have been 
committed, and therefore does not violate this section. State 
V. Silverberg, 78 Miss., 858 (29 So., 761). 

The section applied. Whit v. State, 85 Miss., 208 (37 So., S09). 

Sec. 27. No person shall, for any indictable offense, be proceeded 
against criminally by information, except in cases arising in the land or 
naval forces, or the military when in actual service, or by leave of the 
court for misdemeanor in office; but the Legislature, in cases not punish- 
able by death or by imprisonment in the penitentiary, may dis|x?nse with 
the inquest of the grand jury, and may authorize prosecutions before 



1186 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

justices of the peace, or such other inferior court or courts as may be 
established, and the proceedings in such cases shall be regulated by law 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 12; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 12; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 31.) 

• Indictments cannot be amended as to a matter of substance, 
in the absence of a statute authorizing it, without the consent of 
the grand jury. McGuire v. State, 35 Miss., 366. 

The Legislature may authorize the amendment of indictments 
when they do not deprive the accused of any essential right 
necessary to the ends of justice. Miller v. State, 53 Miss., 403; 
Peeples V. State, 55 Miss., 434. 

But an amendment to an indictment which changes the 
offense cannot be made without the consent of the grand jury; 
identity of offense and of person is necessary. Blumingberg v. 
State, 55 Miss., 528. 

It is not essential that the law shall provide for a trial of mis- 
demeanors by a jury before justices of the peace. Ex parte 
Wooten, 62 Miss., 174. 

The Legislature may make mayors of municipalities ex officio 
justices of the peace in and for their municipalities, and give 
them criminal jurisdiction as such. Bell v, McKinney, 63 
Miss., 187. 

The section expressly authorizes the Legislature to dispense 
with the inquest of a grand jury in the prosecution of misde- 
meanors. Coulter V. State, 75 Miss., 356 (22 So., 872). 
Sec. 28. Cruel or unusual punishment shall not be inflicted, nor 
excessive fines be imposed. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 16; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 16; 1869, Art. I, 
Sec. 8.) 

Sec. 29. Excessive bail shall not be required; and all persons shall. 
before conviction, be bailable by sufficient sureties, except for capital 
offenses when the proof is evident or presumption great. 

The right to bail after conviction is not within the section. 
Ex parte Dyson, 25 Miss., 356; Hill v. State, 64 Miss., 431. 

The court has the discretion to grant bail where the evidence 
is such that the jury might, and perhaps ought, to convict. Ex 
par/e Wray, 30 Miss., 673; Moore v. State, 36 Miss., 137; ex parte 
Beall, 39 Miss., 715; Street v. State, 43 Miss., i. 

But bail should not be granted in such case unless there be 
exceptional circumstances apart from the offense that seem to 
demand it. Ex parte Bridewell, 57 Miss., 39; ex parte Patter- 
son, 56 Miss., 161; ex parte Hamilton, 65 Miss., 147 (3 So., 241). 

Even if the jury in capital cases are authorized to fix the 
punishment at imprisonment for life, bail in such cases is not 
thereby made a matter of right. Ex parte Fortenberry, 53 
Miss., 428. (181 7, Art. I, Sec. 16; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 16; 1869, 
Art. I, Sec. 8). 



POURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI, U87 

Sec. 30. There shall be no imprisonment for debt. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 18; 1832, Art. I, Sec. 18; 1869. Art. I, 
Sec. II.) 

The costs of the prosecution is not a debt within the meaning 
of the section, but the costs of the defence is. Ex parte Mayer, 
57 Miss., 85. 

A statute making it a crime for guardians and others exercising 
public employment to fail to pay over money which comes to 
their hands by virtue of their office or employment, when law- 
fully required to do so, does not violate the section. Money so 
due is not a debt within its meaning. State v. Gillis, 75 Miss., 
331 (24 So., 25). 

A judgment tmder the statute (Code iq:6, Sec. 28) ordering 
the payment of money by the father for the sup)port of a bastard 
child is not a debt within the meaning of the section. Ex parte 
Bridgeforth, 77 Miss., 418 (27 So., 622). 

Sec. 31. The right of trial by jury shall remain inviolate. 

(1817, Art. I, Sec. 287 1832, Art. I, Sec. 28; 1S69, Art. I, 
Sec. 12.) 

A jury within the meaning of the law is composed of twelve 
men. "Wolfe v. Martin, i How. (Miss.), 3?; Byrd v. State, i 
How. (Miss.), 163. 

It is unnecessary for the jury before justices of the peace, or 
inferior courts, to consist of twelve men; it may in such courts 
be wholly dispensed with. (Sec. 27.) Ex parte "Wooten, 62 
Miss., 174. 

The Legislature cannot authorize a judgment, on a motion, 
without a jury, in favor of a surety against the principal for 
money paid. Smith v. Smith, i How. (Miss.), ic2. 

But a motion against a sheriff and his sureties for failure to pay^ 
over money collected does not violate any constitutional right. 
Le-wis V. Garrett, 5 How. (Miss.), 434; see also Bank v. Spencer, 
3 Smed. & M., 305; Hopton v. Swan, 50 Miss., 545. 

A statute limiting peremptory challenges is not violative of the 
section. Dowling v. State, 5 Smed. & M., 664. 

The section secures the right to a jury in all cases to which at 
common law a jury trial was necessary. Isom v. Mississippi 
R. R. Co., 36 Miss., 300. 

The section does not affect the jurisdiction conferred on the 
chancery court by section 163. McBryde v. State Revenue 
Agent, 70 Miss., 716 (12 So., 699). 

Sec. 32. The enumeration of rights in this constitution shall not be 
construed to deny and impair others retained by, and inherent in, the 
people. 

(1817, conclusion Art. I; 1832, lb.; 1869, Art. I, Sec. 32.) 



1188 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Sec. ^^. The Legislative power of this State shall be vested in th.j 
Legislature, which shall consist of a Senate -and a House of Representa- 
tives. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 4; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 4; 1869, Art. IV, 
Sec. I.) 

The Legislature cannot delegate to the whole or any portion of 
the people, or to any other department of the government its 
power to make laws. Alcorn v. Hamer, 38 Miss., 652. 

But the execution of some portions of a statute may be made 
to depend upon the vote of the people. Alcorn v. Hamer, 38 
Miss., 652; Barnes v. Supervisors, 51 Miss., 305; Schulherr v. 
Bordeaux, 64 Miss., 59. 

Section 3039 of the Code of 1892 (Code 1906, Sec. 3444) does 
not violate this section, nor does the Act of 1900, Chapter 69 
(Code 1 9c 6, Sec. 3444), amending said section. Yazoo City v. 
Lightcap, 82 Miss., 148 (33 So., 949). 

The power to create other offices than those provided for by 
the constitution, subject to the limitation mentioned by the 
court, results from the grant to the Legislature of legislative 
power. State v. Hill, 70 Miss., 112 (11 So., 789). 

Therefore the Legislature had the right to create a State 
Revenue Agent and to arm him with power to bring any action 
which the State or any of its political subdivisions could bring. 
lb. 

The Legislature has the right to prescribe the terms upon 
which creditors shall undertake to use and employ the extra- 
ordinary remedy of attachment against their debtors. Mack v. 
Jacobs, 70 Miss., 430 (12 So., 444). 

Hence the Act of 1884 is not unconstitutional because it pro- 
vided that the jury might render a special verdict and assess 
punitive damages against the plaintiff in attachment in certain 
cases and that "any verdict they may assess shall stand" unless 
the court shall certify that it is grossly unconscionable or unwar- 
^ ranted by the facts. lb. 

The Legislature can constitutionally confer on municipalities 
the power, by ordinance, to punish as an offense against the 
municipality an act which constitutes a crime against the State. 
Ocean Springs v. Green, 77 Miss., 472 (27 So., 743)- 

The Legislature has all political power not denied it by the 
State or national constitution. Hinton v. Perry Co., 84 Miss., 
536 (36 So., 565). 

The Legislature may make the operation of statutes dependent 
upon future contingencies. Ormand v. White, 85 Miss., 276 
(37 So., 834). 



! 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1189 

Hence statutes providing for the establishment of stock law 
districts by petition and vote do not violate this section. lb. 

The Legislature may lawfully regulate the time, manner and 
extent of the taking of fish in running streams and lakes with 
outlets into other waters. Ex parte Fritz, 86 Miss., 210 (38 
So., 722). 

Sec. 34. The House of Representatives shall consist of members 
chosen every four years by the qualified electors of the several counties 
and representative districts. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 35. The Senate shall consist of members chosen every four years 
by the qualified electors of the several districts. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 4) 

Sec. 36. The Legislature shall meet at the seat of government in 
regular sessions on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January 
of the year A. D. 1892, and every four years thereafter; and in special 
session on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January of the year 
A. D. 1894, and every four years thereafter, unless sooner convened by 
the Governor. The special sessions shall not continue longer than thirty 
days, unless the Governor, deeming the public interest to require it, 
shall extend the sitting, by proclamation in writing, to be sent to and 
entered upon the journals of each house, tor a specific number of days, 
and then it may continue in session to the expiration of that time. At 
such special sessions the members shall receive not more compensation 
or salary than ten cents mileage and per diem of not exceeding five dol- 
lars; and none but appropriation and revenue bills shall be considered, 
except such other matters as may be acted upon at an extraordinary 
session called by the Governor. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 6.) 

Sec. 37. Elections for members of the Legislature shall be held in the 
several counties and districts as provided by law. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 8.) 

Sec. 38. Each house shall elect its own officers, and shall judge of the 
qualifications, return and election of its own members. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec 10.) 

The term "house" means one branch of the Legislature as 
distinguished from the other. Green v. Weller, 32 Miss., 650. 

Sec. 39. The Senate shall choose a president pro tempore to act in the 
absence or disability of its presiding officer. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 11.) 

QUALIFICATIONS AND PRIVILEGES OF LEGISLATORS. 

Sec. 40. Members of the Legislature, before entering upon the dis- 
charge of their duties, shall take the following oath: "I, , do 

solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully support the constitution 



1190 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

of the United States and of the State of Mississippi ; that I am not dis- 
qualified from holding office by the constitution of this State ; that I will 
faithfully discharge my duties as a legislator; that I will, as soon as 
practicable hereafter, carefully read (or have read to me) the constitu- 
tion of this State, and will endeavor to note, and as a legislator to execute, 
all the requirements thereof imposed on the legislature; and I will not 
vote for any measure or person because of a promise of any other member 
of this Legislature to vote for any measure or person, or as a means of 
influencing him or them so to do. So help me God." 

Sec. 41. No person shall be a member of the House of Representa- 
tives who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one years, and who 
shall not be a qualified elector of, the State, and who shall not have been 
a resident citizen of the State four years, and of the county two years, 
immediately preceding his election. The seat of a member of the House 
of Representatives shall be vacated on his removal from the county or 
flotorial district from which he was elected. 

(181 7, Art. Ill, Sec. 7; 1832, Art. HI, Sec. 7; 1869, Art. IV, 
Sec. 3.) 

Sec. 42. No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained the 
age of twenty-five years, who shall not have been a qualified elector of 
the State four years, and who shall not be an actual resident of the dis- 
trict or territory he may be chosen to represent for two years before his 
election. The seat of a Senator shall be vacated upon his removal from 
the district from which he was elected. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 14; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 5.) 

Sec. 43. No person liable as principal for public moneys unaccounted 
for shall be eligible to a seat in either house of the Legislature, or to any 
office of profit or trust, until he shall have accounted for and paid over 
all sums for which he may have been liable. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 28; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 28; 1869, Art. IV, 
Sec. 16.) 

A judicial determination of the liability is not essential. 
Brady v. Howe, 50 Miss., 607. 

The prohibition applies to private citizens as well as to officers. 
Hoskins v. Brantley, 57 Miss., 814. 

A person disqualified under the section, though a de facto 
officer, cannot maintain an action for fees. Matthews v. Copiah 
Co., 53 Miss., 715. 

Sec. 44. No person shall be eligible to a seat in either house of the 
Legislature, or to any orrice of profit or trust, who shall have been con- 
victed of bribery-, perjury, or other infamous crime; and any person who 
shall have been convicted of giving or offering, directly or indirectly, 
any bribe to procure his election or appointment, and any person who 
shall give or offer any bribe to procure the election or appointment of 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 



•ll91 



any person to office, shall, on conviction thereof, be disqualified from 
holding any office of profit or trust under the laws of this State. 

(1817, Art. VI, Sees. 4 and 5; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 4; 1869, 
Art. IV, Sees. 17 and 18.) 

A judicial conviction is essential under this section. Brady' 
V. Howe, 50 Miss., 607. 

But a pardon removes the ineligibility. Jones v. Registrars 
of Alcorn Co., 56 Miss., 766. 

Sec. 45. No Senator or Representative, during the term for which he 
was elected, shall be eligible to any office of profit which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments of which have been increased, during the time 
such Senator or Representative was in office, except to such offices as may 
be filled by an. election of the people. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 26; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 26; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 38.) 

An office is a continuing charge or employment the duties of 
which are defined by n.iles prescribed by law and not by con- 
tract. Alcorn v. Shelby, 36 Miss., 273. 

In case of the creation of a new county by the Legislature, a 
member thereof cannot be appointed to one of the county offices. 
Brady v. West, 50 Miss., 68. 

Sec. 46. The members of the Legislature shall severally receive from 
the State treasury compensation for their services, to be prescribed by 
law, which may be increased or diminished; but no alteration of such 
compensation of members shall take effect during the session at which 
it is made. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 25; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 25; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 20.) 

Sec. 47. No member of the Legislature shall take any fee or reward 
or be counsel in any measure pending before either house of the Legis- 
lature, under penalty of forfeiting his seat, upon proof thereof to the 
satisfaction of the house of which he is a member. 

Sec. 48.. Senators and Representatives shall, in all cases, except 
treason, felony, theft, or breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest 
during the session of the Legislature, and for fifteen days before the 
commencement and after the termination of each session. 

(181 7, Art. Ill, Sec. 19; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 19; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 19.) 

TRIAL OF OFFICERS. 

Sec. 49. The House of Representatives shall have the sole power of 
impeachment; but two-thirds of all the members present must concur 
therein. All impeachments shall be tried by the Senate, and, when 
sitting for that purpose, the Senators shall be sworn to do justice accord- 
ing to law and the evidence. 

(181 7, Art. "Impeachment," Sees, i and 2; 1832, Art. VI, 
Sees. I and 2; 1869, Art. IV, Sec. 27.) 



1192 POURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

Sec. 50. The Governor and all other civil officers of this State, shall 
be Kable to impea;ch"ment for treason, bribery, or any high crime or mis- 
demeanor in office. 

(181 7, Art. "Impeachment," Sec. 3; 1832, Art. VI, Sec. 3; 
1869, Art. IV, Sec. 28.) 

Sec 51. Judgment in such cases shall not extend further than removal 
from office and disqualification to hold any office of honor, trust, or profit 
in this State; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be subject to 
indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment according to law. 

(181 7, Art. "Impeachment," Sec. 3; 1832, Art. VI, Sec. 3; 
1869, Art. IV, Sec. 30.) 

Sec. 52. When the Governor shall be tried, the Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court shall preside; and when the Chief Justice is disabled, 
disqualified, or refuses to act, the judge of the Supreme Court next oldest 
in commission shall preside; and no person shall be convicted without 
concurrence of two-thirds of all the Senators present. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 29.) 

Sec. 53. For reasonable cause, which shall not be sufficient ground of 
impeachment, the Governor shall, on the joint address of two-thirds of 
each branch of the Legislature, remove from office 'the judges of the 
Supreme and inferior courts ; but the cause or causes of removal shall be 
spread on the journals and the party charged be notified of the same, and 
have an opportunity to be heard by himself or counsel, or both, before 
the vote is finally taken and decided. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 27; 1869, Art. IV, Sec. 31.) 

RULES OF PROCEDURE. 

Sec 54. A majority of each house shall constitute a quorum to do 
business; but a less number may adjourn from day to day, and compel 
the attendance of absent members in such maimer and under such penal- 
ties as each shall provide. 

(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 12.) 
Sec 55. Each house may determine rules of its own proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of 
two-thirds of the members present, expel a member; but no member, 
unless expelled for theft, bribery, or corruption, shall be expelled the 
second time for the same offense. Both houses shall, from time to time. 
publish journals of their proceedings, except such parts as may, in their 
opinion, require secrecy; and the yeas and nays, on any question, shall be 
entered on the journal, at the request of one-tenth of the members 
present; and the yeas arid nays shall be entered on the journal on the 
final passage of every bill. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sees. 16 and 17; 1S32, Art. Ill, Sees. 15, 16 
and 17; 1869, Art. IV, Sec. 14.) 

The term "house" means one branch of the Legislature as 
distinguished from the other. " Green v. Weller, 32 Miss., 650. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1193 

Sec. 56. The style of the laws of the State shall be: "Be it enacted 
by the Legislature of the State of Mississippi." 

(1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 4; 1869, Art. IV, Sec. 32.) 
It is not required that the Legislature should literally adhere 
to the words as to the style of the laws; statutes should show 
on their face the authority by which they were adopted. Swan 
V. Buck, 40 Miss., 268. 

Sec. 57. Neither house shall, without the consent of the other, 
adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in 
which the two houses shall be sitting. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 22; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 22; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 13.) 

Sec. 58. The doors of each house, when in session, or in committee of 
the whole, shall be kept open, except in cases which may require secrecy; 
and each house may punish, by fine and imprisonment, any person not a 
member who shall be guilty of disrespect to the house by any disorderly 
or contemptuous behavior in its presence, or who shall in any way disturb 
its deliberations during the session; but such imprisonment shall not 
extend beyond the final adjournment of that session. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 20; 1832, Art. Ill, Sees. 20 and 21; 1869, 
Art. IV. Sec. 15.) 

Sec. 59. Bills may originate in either house, and be am.ended or 
rejected in the other; and every bill shall be read on three different days 
in each house, unless two-thirds of the house where the same is pending 
shall dispense with the rules; and every bill shall be read in full imme- 
diately before the vote on its final passage ; and every bill, having passed 
both houses, shall be signed by the President of the Senate and the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, in open session ; but before 
either shall sign any bill, he shall give notice thereof, suspend business in 
the house over which he presides, have the bill read by its title, and, on 
the demand of any member, have it read in full; and all such proceedings 
shall be entered on the journal. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 23; 1832, Art. Ill, Sec. 23; 1869, Art. 

IV, Sec. 23.) 

This section has no application to an act adopting and putting 

in force a code of laws. Hunt v. Wright, 70 Miss., 29S (11 

So., 608). 

Sec 60. No bill shall .be so amended in its passage through either 
house as to change its original purpose, and no law shall be passed except 
by bill; but orders, votes, and resolutions of both houses, affecting the 
prerogatives an<:l duties thereof, or relating to adjournment, to amend- 
ments to the constitution, to the investigation of public officers, and the 
like, shall not require the signature of the Governor; and such resolu- 
tions, orders, and votes, may empower legislative committees to admin- 



1194 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

ister oaths, to send for persons and papers, and generally make legislative 
investigations effective. 

(1832, Art. V, Sec. 16; 1869, Art. IV, Sec. 25.) 
The section has no application to an act adopting and putting 
in force a code of laws. Hunr v. Wright, 70 Miss., 298 (11 
So., 608). 

Sec. 61. No law shall be revived or amended by reference to its title 
only, but the section or sections, as amended or revived, shall be inserted 
at length. 

The section has no application to an act adopting and putting 
in force a code of laws. Hunt v. Wright, 70 Miss., ^298 (11 
So., 608). 

It follows that part of a statute repealed, left out of the repeal- 
ing statute, is no longer law. Nations v. Lovejoy, 80 Miss., 401 
(31 So., 811). 

Sec. 62. No amendment to bills by one house shall be concurred in 
by the other except by a vote of the majority thereof, taken by yeas and 
nays and the names of those voting for and against recorded upon the 
journals; and reports of committees of conference shall in Hke manner 
be adopted in each house. 

Sec. 63. No appropriation bill shall be passed by the Legislature 
which does not fix definitely the maximum sum thereby authorized to 
be drawn from the treasury. 

This section and Sections 64, 68, 69, 73, 116 and 123 referred 
to commented upon and applied. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 
769 (39 So., 65). 

Sec. 64. No bill passed after the adoption of this constitution to make 
appropriations of money out of the State treasury shall continue in force 
more than six months after the meeting of the Legislature at its next 
regular session; nor shall such bill be passed except by the votes of a 
majority of all the members elected to each house of the Legislature. 
This section and Sections 63, 68, 69, 73, 116 and 123 referred to, 
commented upon and applied. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 769 
(39 So., 65). 

Sec. 65. All votes on the final passage of any measure shall be subject 
to reconsideration for at least one whole legislative day, and no motion 
to reconsider such vote shall be disposed of adversely on the day on 
which the original vote was taken, except on the last day of the session. 

Sec. 66. No law granting a donation, or gratuity, in favor of any 
person or object shall be enacted, except by the concurrence of two- 
thirds of each branch of the Legislature, nor by any vote for a sectarian 
purpose or use. 

Sec. 67.'^No'^new'^billfshall'be'^introduced into either house of the 
Legislature during the last three days of the session. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 1195 

Sec. 68. Appropriation and revenue bills shall, at regular sessions of 
the Legislature, have precedence in both houses over all other business, 
and no such bills shall be passed during the last five days of the session. 
The section is binding as a matter of procedure on the Legisla- 
ture, but its disregard is beyond the control of the courts. Hunt 
v. Wright, 70 Miss., 298. 

Sec. 69. General appropriation bills shall contain only the appro- 
priations to defray the ordinar\' expenses of the executive, legislative, 
and judicial departments of the government; toj'pay interest on' State 
bonds, and to support the common schools. All other appropriations 
shall be made by separate bills, each embracing but one subject. Legis- 
lation shall not be engrafted on appropriation bills, but the same may 
prescribe the conditions on which the money may be dra-^-n, and for 
what purposes paid. 

The Governor cannot, under Section 73, veto that part of a 

special appropriation bill in which is expressed, under the 

section, the conditions on which the money may be drawn. ' 

State V. Holder, 76 Miss., 15 8. 

This section and Sections 63,64,68, 73, 116 and 123 referred 

to, commented upon and applied. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 

769 (39 So., 65). 

Sec. 70. Xo revenue bill, or any bill pro\"iding for assessments of 
property for taxation, shall become a law except by vote of at least 
three-nfths of the members of each house present and voting. 

The section is binding as a matter of procedure on the Legis- 
lature, but its disregard is beyond the control of the courts. 
Hunt V. Wright, 7c Miss.. 29S (11 So., 6c8). 

Sec. 71. Every biU introduced into the Legislature shall have a title, 
and the title ought to indicate clearly the subject-matter or matters of the 
proposed legislation. Each committee to which a bill may be referred 
shall express, in "^-riting, its judgment of the sumciency of the title 01 the 
bill, and this, too, whether the recommendation be that the biii do pass 
or do not pass. 

Sec. 72. Every bill which shall pass bc-th houses shall be presented 
to the Governor of the State. If he approve, he shall sign it; but if he 
does not approve, he shall retiim it, with his objections, to the house in 
which it originated, which shall enter the objections at large upon its 
journal, and proceed to reconsider it. If after such reconsideration 
two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, 
with the objections, to the other house, by which, likewise, it shall be 
reconsidered; and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall become 
a law; but in all such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined 
by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against 
the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. If 
any bill shall not be returned by the Governor within five days (Sundays 



■!b.'i^ .)-■ <^ri 



1196 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

excepted) after it|has been presented to him, it shall become a law in 
like manner as if he had signed it, unless the Legislature, by adjournment, 
prevent its return, in which case it shall be a law unless sent back within 
three days after the beginning of the next session of the Legislature, 
No bill shoU be approved w^hen the Legislature is not in session. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 15; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 15; 1869, Art. IV, 
Sec. 24.) 

The official publication of an act which was presented to the 
Governor within five da3^s of an adjournment of the Legislature 
raises the presumption that the Governor failed to return it 
within three days after the beginning of the next session. 
Bowen v. Gilleylen, 58 Miss., 813. 

The section applies where the Governor has wrongfully under- 
taken to approve a part and veto another part of a bill and the 
Legislature has adjourned within five days after the bill was sent 
to him for approval. In such case it remains in his hands in 
legal contemplation. State v. Holder, 76 Miss., 158 (23 So., 643). 

Sec. 73. The Governor may veto parts of any appropriation bil , and 
approve parts of the same, and the portions approved shall be law. 

The section relates to distinct appropriations contained in 
general appropriation bills and separable items of special appro- 
priation bills, and does not authorize the veto of that part of a 
special appropriation bill in which, under Sec. 69, is expressed 
the conditions on which the money may be drawn. State v. 
Holder, 76 Miss., 158 (23 So., 643). 

This section and Sections 63, 64, 68, 69, 116 and 123 referred 
to, commented upon and apphed. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 
769 (39 So., 65). 

Sec. 74. No bill shall become a law until it shall have been referred 
to a committee of each house and returned therefrom with a recom- 
mendation in writing. 

Sec. 75. No law^ of a general nature, unless therein otherwise provided, 
shall be enforced until sixty days after its passage. 

(1832, Art. VII, Sec. 6; 1869, Art. XII, Sec. 9.) 

Sec. 76. In all elections by the Legislature the members shall vote 
viva voce, and the votes shall be entered on the journals. 

Sec 77. The Governor shall issue writs of election to nil such vacancies 
as may occur in either house of the Legislature, and the persons thereupon 
chosen shall hold their seats for the unexpired term. 

INJUNCTIONS. 

Sec 78. It shall be the duty of the Legislature to regulate by law the 
cases in which deductions shall be made from salaries of public officers 
for neglect of official duty, and the amount of said deduction. 



1 






FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1197 

(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 12; 1869, Art. 
XII, Sec. 10.) 

The section does not deprive the Legislature of power to pro- 
vide for reductions from salaries because of a failure to perform 
official duties on account of sickness and like causes. Cole v. 
Humphreys, 78 Miss., 163 (28 So., 808). 

Sec. 79. The Legislature shall provide by law for the sale of all 
delinquent tax lands. The courts shall apply the same liberal principles 
in favor of such titles as in sale by execution. The right of redemption 
from all sales of real estate, for the non-payment of taxes or special 
assessments, of any and every character w^hatsoever, shall exist, on con- 
ditions to be prescribed by law, in favor of owners and persons interested 
in such real estate, for a period of not less than two years. 

(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 8.) ^ 

The essential things which create authority in the tax collector j 

to collect the taxes by sale are: A legal assessment (that con- 3 

stitutes the owner of the property a debtor to the State) ; and, _A 

second, a delivery of the assessment roll to the collector (that '4 

authorizes him to receive the money as therein charged against ' 1 

property or persons) ; and, third, if default is made in payment 4 

on the day appointed by law, he has power to distrain and sell. -3 

If these concur, the constitution is imperative that the courts 
shall regard the sale with the same indulgences and favor as it 
does that of a sheriff under execution. Virden v. Bowers, 55 
Miss., i; Wolfe v. Murphy, 60 Miss., i. 

A sale for legal and illegal taxes jointly is not protected by 
the section. Gamble v. Witty, 55 Miss., 26; Capital State Bank 
v. Lewis, 64 Miss., 727 (2 So., 243); Peterson v. Kittridge, 65 
Miss., 33 (3 So., 824). 

But the legal taxes must not, by statute, be tendered before 
sale. 

The section applies only to cases in which the power of sale 
exists. Caston v. Caston, 60 Miss., 475. 

The section was prospective only. Under Sec. 274, continu- 
ing existing statutes in force until April i, 1892, the right to 
redeem land sold for taxes in March, 1 891, was Hmited to one year. 
LeBlanc v. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co., 72 Miss., 669 (18 So., 381). 
The section did not extend the time for redemption from sales 
made in March, 1892; the previous statute on the subject (Code 
1880, Sec. 531) having been continued in force until April r, 
1892, by Section 274 constitution. Judah v. Brothers, 71 
Miss., 414 (14 So., 455). 

Sec. 80. Provision shall be made by general laws to prevent the 
abuse by cities, towns, and other municipal corporations of their powers 
of assessment, taxation, borrowing monev, and contracting debts. 



1198 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

History of legislation, constitutional and statutory, relating 
to the powers of the board of supervisors reviewed. Monroe 
County V. Strong, 78 Miss., 565 (29 So., 530). 

The section is prospective only and did not repeal existing 
municipal charters. Lum v. Vicksburg, 72 Miss., 950 (18 So., 
476). 
Sec. 81. The Legislature shall never authorize the permanent obstruc- 
tion of any of the navigable waters of the State, but may provide for the 
removal of such obstructions as now exist, whenever the public welfare 
demands. This section shall not prevent the construction, under proper 
authority, of drawbridges for railroads, or other roads, nor the con- 
struction of booms "and chutes" for logs in such manner as not to prevem: 
the safe passage of vessels, or logs, under regulations to be provided 
by law. 

The State may authorize the diversion of streams from their 
old channels for the purpose of improving the navigation, and 
riparian owners have no cause of complaint. Commissioners v. 
Withers, 29 Miss,, 21. 

The section does not interfere with the police power of the 
State to grant ferry licenses. Marshall v. Grimes, 41 Miss., 27. 
. A riparian owner, without legislative sanction, cannot right- 
fully maintain a boom for the stoppage of logs. Pascagoula, 
etc., Co. V. Dixon, 77 Miss., 587 (28 So., 724). 

Sec. 82. The Legislature shall fix the amount of the penalty of all 
official bonds, and may, as far as practicable, provide that the whole or 
a part of the security required for the faithful discharge of official duty 
shall be made by some guarantee company or companies. 

The section has no appHcation to bonds of officers created 
alone by statute. Gloster v. Harrell, 77 Miss., 793 (23 So., 520). 

Sec. 83. The Legislature shall enact laws to secure the safety of 
persons from fires in hotels, theatres, and other pubHc places of resort. 
Sec. 84. The Legislature shall enact laws to limit, restrict, or prevent 
the acquiring and holding of land in this State by non-resident aliens, 
and may limit or restrict the acquiring or holding of lands by corporations. 
Sec. 85. The Legislature shall provide by general law for the working 
of public roads by contract or by county prisoners, or both. Such law 
may be put in operation only by a vote of the board of supervisors in 
those counties where it may be desirable. 

An indictment for failure to perform a contract to keep a road 
in repair must show that the law had been so put in operation in 
the county in which the road is situated. Gilmore v. Slate, 
33 So., 171. 
Sec. 86. It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide by law for 
the treatment and care of the insane; and the Legislature may provide 
for the care of the indigent sick in the hospitals of the State. 
(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 27.) 



l! 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. « 1199 
LOCAL LEGISLATION. 

Sec. 87. No special or local law shall be enacted for the benefit of 
individuals or corporations, in cases which are or can be provided for by 
general law, or where the relief sought can be given by any court of this 
State; nor shall the operation of any general law be suspended by the 
Legislature for the benefit of any individual or private corporation or 
association, and in all cases where a general law can be made applicable, 
and would be advantageous, no special law shall be enacted. 

A railroad corporation is a private one within the meaning of 
this section. Yazoo R. Co. v. Southern R. Co., 83 Miss., 746 
(36 So., 74). 

This section is violated by Chapter 89 of the Acts of 1902. lb. 

See in this connection: Constitution 1890, § 179; charter Y. 

&M.y. R.Co., Laws of 1882, p. 838; Code 1892, §3572 and §3560 

as amended by Laws 1898, Ch. 80 (Code 1906, Sees. 4057, 4073) ; 

Constitution 1890, § 89. 

Sec. 88. The Legislature shall pass general laws, under which local 
and private interests shall be provided for and protected, and under 
which cities and towns may be chartered and their charters amended, 
and under which corporations may be created, organized, and their acts 
of incorporation altered; and all such laws shall be subject to repeal or 
amendment. 

The section is prospective only and did not repeal existing 
municipal charters. Lum v. Vicksburg, 72 Miss., 950 (18 So., 
476). 

This section merely requires the passage of uniform general 
laws prescribing the mode by which municipal charters may be 
granted and amended, and does not require such laws to contain 
the entire contents of such amendments. Yazoo City v. Light- 
cap, 82 Miss., 148 (33 So., 949). 

Neither this section nor Section 91 affected § 8, Chapter 250, 
of the Laws of 1890, authorizing a salary to members of the 
board of supervisors of Madison County, such sections being 
prospective. Adams v. Dendy, 82 Miss., 135 {2>3 So., 843). 

The Act of 1894 (p. 29), authorizing the intervention of the 
State Revenue Agent for the assessment and collection of munic- 
ipal taxes on property that had escaped taxation is not unconsti- 
tutional on the alleged ground that it deprives the city of the 
right of local self-government, although the city is operating 
under a special charter delegating to it the power of taxation. 
Adams v. Kuykendall, 83 Miss., 571 (35 So., 830). 

This section does not deprive the Legislature of the right to 
control the taxing p(3wer previously delegated to a municipality 
by a special charter. lb. 

The Legislature can constitutionally confer on municipalities 
the power, by ordinance, to punish as an offense against the 



k ■ ■"■ '^''"^' 



1200 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI, 

municipality an act which constitutes a crime against the State. | 

Ocean Springs v. Green, 77 Miss., 472 (27 So., 743). 

Section 2921 of the Code of 1892 (Code 1906, Sec. 3312), 
authorizing the Governor to pass upon and approve applica- 
tions for the incorporation of cities, towns and villages, is con- 
stitutional. Jackson v. Whiting, 84 Miss., 163 (36 So., 611).. 2 

Sec. 89. There shall be appointed in each house of the Legislature a t 

standing committee on local and private legislation; the house committee I 

to consist of seven Representatives, and the Senate committee of five ; 

Senators. No local or private bill shall be passed by either house until t 

it shall have been referred to said committee thereof, and shall have been ; 

reported back with a recommendation in writing that it do pass, stating ^ 

affirmatively the reasons therefor, and why the end to be accomplished I 

should not be reached by a general law, or by a proceeding in court; or ' 
if the recommendation of the committee be that the bill do not pass, then 

it shall not pass the house to w^hich it is so reported unless it be voted ■, 
for by a majority of all the members elected thereto. If a bill is passed 

in conformity to the requirements hereof, other than such as are pro- I 

hibited in the next section, the courts shall not, because of its local, . i 

Special, or private nature, refuse to enforce it. | 

\ -Chapter 89, Laws of 1902, is violative of this section. Yazoo I 

K R. Co. v. Southern R. Co., 85 Miss., 746 (36 So., 74). I 

j." Sec. 90. The Legislature shall not pass local, private, or special laws | 

\- in any of the following enumerated cases, but such matters shall be pro- ^ 

J vided for only by general laws, viz.: * 

t (a) Granting divorces. | 

I ^ (1817, Art. VI, Sec. 7; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 15; 1869, Art. IV, j 

I Sec. 22.) I 

(6) Changing the names of persons, places, or corporations. | 

(c) Providing for changes of venue in civil and criminal cases. ^ 

(d) Regulating the rate of interest on money. i 

(e) Concerning the settlement or administration of any estate, or the •: 
sale or mortgage of any property, of any infant, or of a person of unsound f 
mind, or of any deceased person. J 

(/) The removal of the disability of infancy. 4 

(g) Granting to any person, corporation, or association the right to | 
have any ferry, bridge, road, or fish trap. 

(h) Exemption of property from taxation or from levy or sale, 
(t) Providing for the adoption or legitimation of children. 

(j) Changing the law of descent and distribution. { 

(k) Exempting any person from jury, road, or other civil duty (and ^ - 

no person shall be exempted therefrom by force of any local or private 

law) . * 

The paragraph repealed previously existing laws the passage ^ 

of which are inhibited by it. Chidsey v. Scranton, 70 Miss., * 

449 (12 So., 545). j 



'•M 



1, . .--i 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1201 

« 

(/) Laying out, opening, altering, and working roads and highways. 
(w) Vacating any road or highway, town plat, street, alley, or public 
grounds. 

(») Selecting, drawing, summoning, or empaneling grand or petit 
juries. 

(o) Creating, increasing, or decreasing the fees, salary, or emolu- 
ments of any public officer. 

Statutes authorizing the board of supervisors to provide an 
abstract of title to lands in the county and cause it to be kept 
up to date at all times and empowering the chancery clerk to 
charge abstract fees do not violate the section or clause. Yazoo, 
etc., R. R. Co. V. Edwards, 78 Miss., 950 (29 So., 770). 

A law applicable only to a single county, providing that no per- 
son shatl be. liable to jury duty outside the district in which he 
lives, violates paragraph n of this section. Burt v. State, 86 
Miss., 280 (38 So., 233). .1 

(/>) Providing for the management or support of any private or j 

common school, incorporating the same, or granting such school any - ..j 

privileges. j 

{q) Relating to stock laws, water courses, and fences. i 

(r) Conferring the power to exercise the right of eminent domain, i 

or granting to any person, corporation, or association the right to lay -j 

down railroad tracks or street car tracks in any other manner than that j 

prescribed by general law. 1 

(5) Regulating the practice in courts of justice. -j 

(t) Providing for the creation of districts for the election of justices j 

of the peace and constables ; and 

(w) Granting any lands under control of the State to any person or 
corporation. 

PROHIBITION. 

Sec. 91. The Legislature shall not enact any law for one or more 
counties, not applicable to all the counties in the State, increasing the 
uniform charge for the registration of deeds, or regulating costs and 
charges and fees of officers. 

Neither this section nor Sec. 88 affected Sec. 8, Chapter 250, 
Laws of 1S90, authorizing a salary to members of the board of 
supervisors of Madison County, such sections being prospective. 
Adams v. Dendy, 82 Miss., 135 (:^^ So., 843). 

Sec. 92. The Legislature shall not authorize payment to any person 
of the salary of a deceased officer beyond "the date of his death. 

Sec. 93. The Legislature shall not retire any officer on pay, or part 
fJay, or make any grant to such retiring officer. 

Sec 94. The Legislature shall never create by law any distinction 
between the rights of men and women to acquire, own, enjoy, and dispose 
of property of all kinds, or their power to contract in reference thereto. 



'1 -V... -7. 



1202 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

^rarried women are hereby fully emancipated from all disability on account 
of coverture. But this shall not prevent the Legislature from regulating 
contracts between husband and wife; nor shall the Legislature be pre- 
vented from regulating the sale of homesteads. 
(1869, Art. I, Sec. 16.) 

A contract whereby a wife relinquishes, on sufficient consider- 
ation, all claims on her husband's estate is authorized by this 
section. Wyatt v. Wyatt, 81 Miss., 219 (32 So., 317). 

This section applied. Southworth v. Brownlow, 84 Miss., 405 
(36 So., 522). 

Sec. 95. Lands belonging to, or under the control of the State, shall 
never be donated directly or indirectly, to private corporations or indi- 
viduals, or to railroad companies. Nor shall such land be. sold to cor- 
porations or associations for a less price than that for which it is subject 
to sale to. individuals. This, however, shall not prevent the Legislature 
from granting a right of way, not exceeding one hundred feet in width, 
as a mere easement, to railroads across State land, and the Legislature 
shall never dispose of the land covered by said right of way so long as 
such easement exists. 

Sec. 96. The Legislature shall never grant extra compensation, fee, 
or allowance, to any public officer, agent, servant, or contractor, after 
service rendered or contract made, nor authorize payment, or part pay- 
ment, of any claim under any contract not authorized by law; but appro- 
priations may be made for expenditures in repelling invasion, preventing 
or suppressing insurrections. 

Sec. 97. The Legislature shall have no power to revive any remedy 
which may have become barred by lapse of time, or by any statute of 
limitation of this State. 

The section relates alone either to an express statute of 
limitations or to a lapse of time dealt with under the statute or 
the general law as a limitation of time. North British & Mercan- 
tile Ins. Co. V. Edwards, 85 Miss., 322 (37 So., 748). 

This section has no application to a contract by which the 
parties agree that an action shall not be brought thereon after a 
specified time. It relates wholly to limitations prescribed by 
statute. Insurance Co. v. Edwards, 85 Miss., 322 (37 So., 748). 

Sec. 98. No lottery shall ever be allowed, or be advertised by news- 
papers, or otherwise, or its tickets be sold in this State; and the Legis- 
lature shall provide by law for the enforcement of this provision; nor 
shall any' lottery heretofore authorized be permitted to be drawn or its 
tickets sold. 

(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 15.) 

Lotteries being contrary' to good morals, are not the subject of 
contract. Miss. Society of Arts v. Musgrove, 44 Miss., 820; 
Moore v. State, 48 Miss., 147. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1203 

Sec. 99. The Legislature shall not elect any other than its own 
officers, State Librarian, and United States Senators; but this section 
shall not prohibit the Legislature from appointing Presidential electors. 

Sec. 100. No obHgation or liability of any person, association, or 
corporation held or owned by this State, or levee board, or any county, 
city, or town thereof, shall ever be remitted, released or postponed, or 
in any way diminished by the Legislature, nor shall such liability or 
obligation be extinguished except by payment thereof into the proper 
treasury; nor shall such liability or obligation be exchanged or transferred 
except upon payment of its face value; but this shall not be construed 
to prevent the Legislature from providing by general law for the com- 
promise of doubtful claims. 

The word liability in the section is used interchangeably with 

obligation. Adams v. Fragiacomo, 71 Miss., 417 (15 So., 798). 

It is beyond the power of a municipality, under the section, to 

remit or release liability to it for due and unpaid taxes. Morris, 

etc., Co. V. Adams, 75 Miss., 410 (22 So., 944). 

A municipality has no power under this section to refund ; 

money forfeited by the depositor's breach of contract for public j 

work. Jackson Ry., etc., v. Adams, Rev. Agt., 79 Miss., 408 ] 

(30 So., 694). j 

■ 1 
Sec. ioi. The seat of government of the State shall be at the city of ; 

Jackson, and shall not be removed or relocated without the assent of a 

majority of the electors of the .State. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Sec. 102. All general elections for State and county officers shall 
commence and be holden every four years, on the first Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November, until altered by the law; and the electors, in 
all cases except in cases of treason, felony, and breach of peace, shall be 
privileged from arrest during their attendance at elections and in going 
to and returning therefrom. 

(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 7.) '^ 

Sec. 103. In all cases, not otherwise provided for in this constitution, 
the Legislature may determine the mode of filling all vacancies, in all 
offices, and in cases of emergency provisional appointments may be made 
by the Governor, to continue until the vacancy is regularly filled; and 
the Legislature shall provide suitable compensation for all officers, and 
shall define their respective powers. 

(1832. Art. V, Sec. 13; 1869, Art. XII, Sec. 7.) 
The mode of filling vacancies in the office of justice of the peace 
is committed by the section to the Legislature ; but if it be not 
filled as prescribed by statute a case of emergency arises and the 
Governor may fill it provisionally. State v. Lovell, 70 Miss., 
309 (12 So., 341). 



1204 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE QF MISSISSIPPI. 

Sec. 104. Statutes of limitation in civil causes shall not run against 
the State, or any subdivision or municipal corporation thereof. 

The section went into effect on the adoption of the constitu- 
tion and was not suspended by Section 274. Adams v. Illinois, 
etc., R. R. Co., 71 Miss., 752 (15 So., 640). 

The Yazoo- Mississippi Delta Levee District (recognized by 
Art. II) is a subdivision of the State within the section. lb. 

This section suspended the statute of limitations on contracts 
then existing. Wayne County v. Helton, 79 Miss., 122 (29 
So., 820). 

Sec. 105. The Legislature shall provide for the enumeration of the 
whole number of inhabitants, and the qualified electors of the State, 
once in every ten years; and the first enumeration shall be m.ade during 
the two months beginning on the first Monday of June, 1895, and the 
Legislature shall provide for the same by law. 
(1869, Art. IV, Sec. S3-) 

Sec. 106. There shall be a State Librarian, to be chosen by the Legis- 
lature, on joint vote of the two houses, to serve four years, whose duties 
and compensation shall be prescribed by law. Any woman, a resident 
of the State four years, and who has attained the age of twenty years, 
shall be eligible to said office. 

Sec. 107. All stationery, printing, paper, and fuel, used by the Legis- 
lature, and other departments of the government, shall be furnished, and 
the printing and binding of the laws, journals, department reports, and 
other printing, and binding, and the repairing and furnishing the halls 
and rooms used for the meeting of the Legislature and its committees 
shall be performed under contract, to be given to the lowest responsible 
bidder, below such maximum and under such regulations as may be 
prescribed by law. No member of the Legislature or officer of any 
department shall be in any way interested in such contract, and all such 
contracts shall be subject to the approval of the Governor and State 
Treasurer. 

Sec. 108. Whenever the Legislature shall take away the duties per- 
taining to any office, then the salary of the officer shall cease. 

Sec. 109. No public officer or member of the Legislature shall be 
interested, directly or indirectly, in any contract with the State, or any 
district, county, city, or town thereof, authorized by any law passed or 
order made by any board of which he may be or may have been a member, 
during the term for which he shall have been chosen, or within one year 
after the expiration of such term. 

Sec iio. The Legislature may provide, by general law. for con- 
demning rights of way for private roads, whore necessary for ingress and 
egress by the party applying, on due compensation being first made to 
the owner of the property; but such rights of way shall not be provided 
for in incorporated cities and towns. 



A ■'?! 



j,:nT 



.ho 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1205 

Sec. III. All lands comprising a single tract sold in pursuance of 
decree of court, or execution, shall be first offered in subdivisions not 
exceeding one hundred and sixty acres, or one-quarter section, and then 
offered as an entirety, and the price bid for the latter shall control only 
when it shall exceed the aggregate of the bids for the same in subdivisions 
as aforesaid; but the chancery court, in cases before it, may decree other- 
wise if deemed advisable to do so. 
(1869, Art. XII, Sec. i8.) 

The objection that lands were sold in tracts exceeding one 
hundred and sixty acres must be made within time prescribed 
by law. Bradley v. Villere, 66 Miss., 399 (6 So., 208). 

Sec. 112. Taxation shall be uniform and equal throughout the State. 
Property shall be taxed in proportion to its value. The Legislature may, 
however, impose a tax per capita upon such domestic animals as from 
their nature and habits are destructive of other property. Property 
shall be assessed for taxes under general laws, and by uniform rules, 
according to its true value. But the Legislature may provide for a 
special mode of valuation and assessment for railroads, and railroad and 
other corporate property, or for particular species of property belonging 
to persons, corporations, or associations not situated wholly in one 
county. But all such property shall be assessed at its true value, and no 
county shall be denied the right to levy county and special taxes upon 
such assessment as in other cases of property situated and assessed in 
the county. 

(1869, Art. XII, Sec 20.) 

Local and special assessments not prohibited by the section. 
Alcorn v. Hamer, 38 ?kliss., 652; Daily v. Swope, 47 Miss., 367; 
Vassar v. George, 47 Miss., 713. 

This section does not prohibit exemptions. Miss. Mills v. Cook, 
56 Miss., 40. 

The Legislature cannot prescribe the payment of a docket tax 
in a particular judicial district for the payment of the judge. 
Murray v. Lehman, 61 Miss., 283. 

An assessment is a prerequisite to taxation on property. State 
v Adler, 68 Miss., 487 (9 So., 645). 

Whenever a tax is according to value an assessment is a 
prerequisite to its validity. Thibodeaux v. State, 69 Miss., 683 
(13 So., 352). 

The Legislature cannot dispense with an assessment. State 
V. Vicksburg Bank, 69 Miss., 99 (10 So., 102). 

Local taxation to pay bonds issued for the establishment of 
schools, outside of the established free school system, does not 
violate the equality and uniformity rule. Chrisman v. Brook- 
haven, 70 Miss., 477 (12 So., 458). 

The provision that no county shall be denied the right to levy 
county or special taxes, etc., applies only to assessments of 
railroads or other like property not situated wholly in one 



1206 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

county. Brennan v. Mississippi, etc., Co., 70 Miss., 531 (13 
So., 228). 

The section is the only constitutional limitation on the power 
of the Legislature to exempt property from county and municipal 
taxation. lb. 

The section contemplates that the assessment shall be made 
by the assessor, provided for in Sec. 138. State Revenue Agent 
V. Tonella, 70 Miss., 701 (14 So., 17). 

The uniform and equality rule prescribed by the section is 
not required to be observed in the imposition of special assess- 
ments, as for making sidewalks, etc. Nugent v. Jackson, 72 
Miss., 1040 (18 So., 493). 

A statute providing for the assessment of railroads for back 
taxes by the State Railroad Commission, without appeal, does 
not violate the uniformity and equality rule under the section, 
and does not deprive of property without due process of law, 
although other taxpayers may, under general laws, appeal from 
the tribunal fixing their taxes. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. Adams, 
77 Miss., 764 (25 So., 355). 

A statute (Laws 1S88, p. 24) dividing the counties into classes 
and the lands therein into sub-classes, fixing, according to 
quality, a maximum and minimum value for taxation on the 
lands in the several classes and confining the assessor to the 
limits so fixed, violated Art. 5, Sec. 21, Constitution 1869, pro- 
viding -for an assessor in each county, and Art. 12, Sec. 20, 
. same, requiring property to be taxed according to value. Haw- 
kins V. Mangum, 78 Miss., 97 (28 So., 872). 

Municipal taxation is within the operation of the section. 
Adams v. Capital, etc.. Bank, 75 Miss., 701 (23 So., 395); Adams 
V. Bank of Oxford, 78 Miss., 532 (29 So., 402). 

Under Sec. 20, Art. 12, Constitution 1869, the subjects of 
." taxation could be classified at the discretion of the Legislature, 
and if all of the same class were taxed alike there was no viola- 
tion of the equality and uniformity therein required. The rule 
is different under the section supra. Adams v. Bank, 78 Miss., 
532 (29 So., 402). 

And so the constitutionality of a statute exempting a property 
owner from liability to taxes is a question which a tax collector, 
being merely a ministerial officer, cannot determine, but the 
question is a judicial one for the courts to determine. Yazoo 
R. Co. V. West, 78 Miss., 789 (29 So., 475). 

The railroad commission as assessor of railroad property is 
without power to determine questions of exemptions from 
taxation so as to render them res judicata Yazoo R. Co. v. 
Adams, 8r Miss., 90 (32 So., 937). 

This section does not authorize the railroad commission to 
conclusively determine the judicial question of exemption. lb. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1207 

Section 13 of Art. 12 of the Constitution of 1869 was self- 
executing, and the Legislature had no power not to tax corporate 
. property of the kind taxed to individuals. lb. 

The Legislature may authorize a tax collector to assess such 
persons and personal property as he may find unassessed, as was 
done by section 3804 of the Code of 1892 (Code 1906, Sec. 4320). 
Powell V. McKee, 81 Miss., 229 (32 So., 919). 

The Legislature is without power to classify property for taxa- 
tion except as provided in this section, which is self-executing, 
and hence a provision in a municipal charter granted by the 
Legislature of 1884, exempting from taxation bills and notes 
given in whole or in part payment for property within the city 
subject to taxation is void, either under this provision or under 
Sec. 20, Art. 12, constitution of 1869. Adams v. Kuykendall, 
83 Miss., 571 (35 So., 830). 

Municipal taxation is within the operation of this section. 
Adams v. Bank, 75 Miss., 701 (23 So., 395). 

The act of March 9, 1900, p. 43, imposing a privilege tax "on 
each land timber mill company," but excepting therefrom saw- 
mill operators who do not ship timber or lumber out of the 
State, violates this section and also Art. i, Sec. 8, par. 3, Con- 
stitution United States. Rev. Agt. v. Lumber Co., 84 Miss., 23 
(36 So., 68). 

This section applied to the act of February 22, 1900, p. 16, 
which was held constitutional. Marble v. Fife, 69 Miss., 596 
(13 So., 842). 

Sec. 113. The Auditor shall, within sixty days aftSr the adjournment 
of the Legislature, prepare and publish a full statement of all money 
expended at such session, specifying the items and amount of each item, 
and to whom, and for what paid; and he shall also publish the amounts 
of all appropriations. 

Sec. 114. Returns of all elections by the people shall be made to the 
Secretary of State in such manner as shall be provided by law. 

(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 18; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 16; 1869, Art. 
XII, Sec. 19.) 

Sec. 115. The fiscal year of the State of Missis ippi shall commence 
on the first day of October, and end on the thirtieth day of September 
of each year; and the Auditor of Public Accounts and the Treasurer of 
the State shall compile and have published a full and complete report, 
showing the transactions of their respective offices on or before the 
thirty-first day of December of each year for the preceding fiscal year. 
(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 8.) 



1208 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

Sec. ii6. The chief executive power of this State shall be vested in a 
Governor, who shall hold his office for four years, and who shall be 
ineligible as his immediate successor in office. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. i; 1832, Art. V, Sec. i; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. I.) 

This section and Sees. 63, 64, 68, 69, 73 and 123 referred to, 
commented upon and applied. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 769 
(39 So., 65). 

Sec. 117. The Governor shall be at least thirty years of age, and 
shall have been a citizen of the United States twenty years, and shall 
have resided in this State five years next preceding the day of his election. 
(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 3; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 3; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 3.) 

Sec 118. The Governor shall receive for his services such compen- 
sation as may be fixed by law, which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during his term of office. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 4; 1832, Art. V,. Sec. 4; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 4.) 

Sec 119. The Governor shall be Commander-in-Chief of the Army 
and Navy of the State, and of the militia, except when they shall be 
called into the service of the United States. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 5; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 5; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 5.) 

Sec 120. The Governor may require information in writing from the 
officers in the executive departments of the State on any subject relating 
to the duties of their respective offices. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 6; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 6; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 6.) 

Sec 121. The Governor shall have power to convene the Legislature 
in extraordinary session whenever, in his judgment, the public interest 
\ requires it. Should the Governor deem it necessary to convene the 
I Legislature he shall do so by public proclamation, in which he shall state 
\ the subjects and matters to be considered by the Legislature, when so 
I convened; and the Legislature, when so convened as aforesaid, shall 
i have no power to consider or act upon subjects or matters other than 
f" those designated in the proclamation of the Governor by which the session 
■; is called, except impeachments and examination into the accounts of 
State officers. The Legislature when so convened, may also act on and 
consider such other matters as the Governor may in writing submit to 
them while in session. The Governor may convene the Legislature at 
the seat of government, or at a different place if that shall become danger- 
ous from an enemy or from disease ; and in case of a disagreement between 



3fU :>? 



-,■>•■■>! ■•-..1 



•V. ..j^. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1209 

the two houses with respect to time of adjournment, adjourn them to 
such time as he shall think proper, not beyond the day of the next stated 
meeting of the Legislature. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 7; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 7; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 7.) 

Sec. 122. The Governor shall, from time to time, give the Legislature 
information of the state of the government, and recommend for con- 
sideration such measures as may be deemed necessary and expedient. 
(181 7, Art. IV, Sec. 8; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 8; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 8.) . 

- Sec. 123. The Governor shall see that the laws are faithfully executed. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 9; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 9; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 9.) 

This section and Sees. 63, 64, 68, 69, 73 and 116 referred to, 
commented upon and applied. Colbert v. State, 86 Miss., 769 
(39 So., 65). 

Sec. 124. In all criminal and penal cases, excepting those of treason 
and impeachment, the Governor shall have power to grant reprieves and 
pardons, to remit fines, and in cases of forfeiture, to stay the collection 
until the end of the next session of the Legislature, and by and with the 
consent of the Senate to remit forfeitures. In cases of treason he shall 
have power to grant reprieves, and by and unith consent of the Senate, 
but may respite the sentence until the end of the next session of the 
Legislature; but no pardon shall be granted before conviction; and in 
cases of felony, after conviction no pardon shall be granted until the 
applicant therefor shall have published for thirty days, in some news- 
paper in the county where the crime was committed, and in case there 
be no newspaper published in said county, then in an adjoining county, 
his petition for pardon, setting forth therein the reasons why such pardon 
should be granted. 

(1832, Art. V, Sec. 10; 1869, Art. V, Sec. 10.) 
The Governor may pardon for contempt of court. Ex parte 
Hickey, 4 Smed. & M., 751. 

A pardon restores the right to vote. Jones v. Registrars of 
Alcorn Co., 56 Miss., 766; see Sec. 253 hereof. 

The Governor can respite the sentence of one convicted for a 
capital offense and fix a later day for execution. Ex parte 
Fleming, 60 Miss., 910. 

Sec. 125. The Governor shall have the power, and it is hereby made 
his duty, to suspend alleged defaulting State and county treasurers, and 
defaulting ta.x collectors, pending the investigation of their respective 
accounts, and to make temporary appointments of proper persons to till 
the offices while such investigations are being made; and the Legislature 
shall provide for the enforcement of this provision by appropriate legis- 
lation. 



I 



1210 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Sec. 126. There shall be a seal of the State kept by the Governor, and 
used by him officially, and be called the great seal of the State of Missis- 
sippi. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 12; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 12; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. II.) 

Sec 127. All commissions shall be in the name and by the authority 
of the State of Mississippi, be sealed with the great seal of State, and be 
signed by the Governor, and attested by the Secretary of State. 

(181 7, Art. IV, Sec. 11; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 11; 1869, Art. V, 
Sec. 12.) 

Sec. 128. There shall be a Lieutenant-Governor, who shall be elected I 

at the same time, in the same manner, and for the same term, and who J 

shall possess the same qualifications as required of the Governor. 
(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 18; 1869, Art. V, Sec. 14.) 

Sec 129. The Lieutenant-Governor shall, by virtue of his office, be 
President of the Senate. In committee of the whole he may debate all 
questions, and when there is an equal division in the Senate, or on a 
joint vote of both houses, he shall give the casting vote. 
(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 19; 1869, Art. V, Sec. 16.) 

Sec 130. The Lieutenant-Governor shall receive for his services the 
same corhpensation as the Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
(1869, Art. V, Sec. 16.) 

Sec 131. When the office of Governor shall become vacant, by death 
Of otherwise, the Lieutenant-Governor shall possess the powers and dis- 
charge the duties of said office. When the Governor shall be absent 
from the State, or unable, from protracted illness, to perform the duties 
of the office, the Lieutenant-Governor shall discharge the duties of said 
office until the Governor be able to resume his duties; but if, from disa- 
bility or otherunise, the Lieutenant-Governor shall be incapable of per- 
forming said duties, or if he be absent from the State, the President of 
the Senate pro tempore shall act in his stead; but if there be no such 
president, or if he be disquahfied by like disability, or be absent from the 
State, then the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall assume 
the office of Governor and perform said duties ; and in case of the inability 
of the foregoing officers to discharge the duties of Governor, the Secretary 
of State shall convene the Senate to elect a President pro tempore. The 
officer discharging the duties of Governor shall receive compensation as 1] 

such. Should a doubt arise as to v/hether a vacancy has occurred in the II 

office of Governor, or as to whether any one of the disabilities mentioned I j 

in this section exists or shall have ended, then the Secretary of State f1 

shall submit the question in doubt to the judges of the Supreme Court, |: 

who, or a majority of whom, shall investigate and determine said ques- 
tion, and shall furnish to said Secretary of State an opinion, in writing, 
determining the question submitted to them, which opinion, when 
rendered as aforesaid, shall be final and conclusive. 



'■'■'' -1 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 



•1211 



(1817, Art. IV, Sees. 20, 21 and 22; 1832, Art. V, Sees. 17 and 
18; 1869, Art. V, Sec. 17.) 

Sec. 132. In case the election for Lieutenant-Governor shall be con- 
tested, -the contest shall be tried and determined in the same manner as 
a contest for the office of Governor. 

(1869, Art. V, Sec. 18.) 
Sec. 133. There shall be a Secretary of State, who shall be elected as 
herein provided. He shall be at least twenty-five years of age, a citizen 
of the state five years next preceding the day of his election, and he shall 
continue in office during the term of four years, and shall be keeper of 
the Capitol; he shall keep a correct register of all official acts and pro- 
ceedings of the Governor; and shall, when required, lay the same, and all 
papers, minutes, and vouchers relative thereto, before the Legislature, 
and he shall perform such other duties as m.ay be required of him by law. 
He shall receive such compensation as shall be prescribed. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 14; 1869, Art. V, 1 

Sec. 19.) J 

Sec. 134. A State Treasurer and an Auditor of Public Accounts shall \ 

be elected as herein provided, who shall hold their office for the term of ! 

four years, and shall possess the same qualifications as required for the \ 

Secretary of State. They shall receive such compensation as may be j 

provided by law. Said Treasurer and Auditor of Public Accounts shall - \ 

be ineligible to immediately succeed themselves or each other in office. j 

(181 7, Art. IV, Sec. 25; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 20; 1869, Art. V, j 

Sec. 20.) 

Sec. 135. There shall be a sheriff, coroner, treasurer, assessor, and 

surveyor for each county, to be selected as elsewhere provided herein, 

who shall hold their offices for four years. The sheriff and treasurer 

shall be ineligible to immediately succeed themselves or each other in 

office. 

(1869, Art. V, Sec. 21.) 

A statute (Laws 1888, p. 24) dividing the counties into classes 
and the lands therein into sub-classes, fixing, according to 
, quality, a maximum and minimum value for taxation on the 
lands in the several classes, and confining the assessor to the limits 
so fixed, violated Art. 5, Sec. 21, Constitution 1S69, providing 
for an assessor in each county, and Art. 12, Sec. 20, same, 
requiring property to be taxed according to value. Hawkins 
V. Mangum, 78 Miss., 97 (28 So., 872). 

Sections 3799 and 3804, Code of 1892 (4312 and 4320, Code 
1906), the one authorizing the board of supervisors to increase 
assessments to cover improvements placed on land, and the 
other empowering the tax collector to make additional assess- 
ments, are constitutional. Tunica Co. v. Tate, 78 Miss., 295 
(29 So., 74). 

To the same effect as to^38o4. Code of 1892 (4320, Code 1906). 
See Powell v. McKee, 81 Miss., 229 (32 So., 919). 



1212 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 



Sec. 136. All officers named in this article shall hold their offices 
during the term for which they were selected, unless removed, and until 
their successors shall be duly qualified to enter on the discharge of their 
respective duties. 

(1869, Art. V, Sec. 22.) 

The section applies only to officers elected under the pro- 
vision of the constitution. Andrews v. Covington, 69 Miss,, 
740 (13 So., 853). 

Sec. 137. It shall be the duty of the State Treasurer, within ten days 
after the first day of January and July of each year, to publish a state- 
ment under oath, in some newspaper published at the seat of govern- 
ment, sho\\'ing the condition of the treasury on said days, the balance on 
hand and in what funds, together with a certificate of the Governor that 
he has verified the count of the funds in the treasury, and found the bal- 
ance stated by the Treasurer, actually in the vaults of the treasury, or as 
the truth may be. And it shall be the duty of the Governor, at such 
other times as he may deem proper, to go to the treasury, without giving 
notice to the Treasurer, and verify the cash balance as shown by the 
books, and to publish the fact that he has done so, and whether the 
amount called for by the books be actually in the treasury, and stating 
whether the Treasurer had any notice whatever that the verification 
would be made. 

Sec. 138. The sheriff, coroner, treasurer, assessor, surveyor, clerks 
of courts, and members of the board of supervisors of the several counties, 
and all other officers exercising local jurisdiction therein, shall be selected 
in the manner provided by law for each county. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 24; 1832, Art. V, Sec. 19.) 
The term sheriff ex vi termini in this State implies "tax col- 
lector." Byrne v. State, 50 Miss., 688; French v. State, 52 
Miss., 759. 

The section, taken in connection with Sec. 112, contemplates 
that assessments shall be made by the assessor. State Revenue 
Agent v. Tonella, 70 Miss., 701 (14 So., 17). 

The Legislature may authorize a tax collector to assess such 
persons and personal property as he may find unassessed, as 
was done by Sec. 3804 of the Code of 1892 (Code 1906, Sec. 4320). 
Powell V. McKee, 8i Miss., 229 (32 So., 919). 

Sec. 139. The Legislature may empov/er the Governor to remove and 
appoint officers, in any county or counties or municipal corporations, 
under such regulations as may be prescribed by law. 

Sec. 140. The Governor of the State shall be chosen in the foUo^-ing 
manner: On the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November of 
A. D. 1895, and on the first Tuesday after the first Monday cf November 
in every fourth year thereafter, until the day shall be changed by law, 
an election shall be held in the several counties and districts created for 
the election of members of the House of Representatives in this State, 



i 



i 



H 



I 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIl'l'I. 1213 

i; for Governor, and the person receiving in any county or such Icgiir^lative 

district the highest number of votes cast therein, for said office, shall be 
holden to have received as many votes as such county or district is 
entitled to members in the House of Representatives, which last named 
votes are hereby designated "electoral votes." In all cases where a 
representative is apportioned to two or more counties or districts, the 
electoral vote, based on such representative, shall be equally divided 
among such counties or districts. The returns of said election shall be 
certified by the Election Commissioners, or a majority of them, of the 
several counties and transmitted, sealed, to the seat of government, 
directed to the Secretary of State, and shall be by him safely kept and 
delivered to the Speaker of the House of Representatives at the next 
ensuing session of the Legislature within one day after he shall have been 
elected. The Speaker shall, on the next Tuesday after he shall have 
received said returns, open and publish them in the presence of the 
House of Representatives, and said house shall ascertain and count the 
vote of each county and legislative district and decide any contest that 
may be made concerning the same, and said decision shall be made by 
a majority of the whole number of members of the House of Representa- 
tives concurring therein, by a viva voce vote, which shall be recorded in 
its journal; Provided, In case the two highest candidates have an equal 
number of votes in any county or legislative district, the electoral vote 
of such county or legislative district shall be considered as equally divided 
between them. The person found to have received a majority of all the 
electoral votes, and also a majority of the popular vote, shall be declared 
elected. 

(1817, Art. IV, Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 141. If no person shall receive such majorities, then the House 
of Representatives shall proceed to choose a Governor from the two 
persons who shall have received the highest number of popular votes. 
The election shall be by viva voce vote, which shall be recorded in the 
journal, in such manner as to show for whom each member voted. 

Sec. 142. In case of an election of Governor or any State officer by 
the House of Representatives, no member of that house shall be eligible 
to receive any appointment from the Governor or other State officer, so 
elected, during the term for which he shall be elected. 

Sec. 143. All other State officers shall be elected at the same time, 
and in the same manner as provided for election of Governor. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Sec. 144. The judicial power of the State shall be vested in a Supreme 
Court and such other courts as are provided for in this Constitution. 
(1S17, Art. V. Sec. i; 1S32, Art. IV, Sec. i; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. I.) 



1214 FOURTH. CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

It is not within the power of the Federal Congress to establish 
rules for the administration of justice in State courts. Lumber 
Co. V. Myers, 80 Miss., 435 (31 So., 787). 

The act of Congress, January 13, 1898, providing that promis- 
sory notes shall not be admissible in evidence until the internal 
revenue stamp prescribed by it shall be affixed thereto, does not 
bind the State courts. lb. 

Sec. 145. The Supreme Court shall consist of three judges, any two of 
whom, when convened, shall form a quorum. The Legislature shall 
divide the State into three Supreme Court districts, and the Governor, 
by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint one 
judge for and from each district; but the removal of a judge to the State 
Capital during his term of office shall not render him ineligible as his own 
successor for the district from which he has removed. The present 
incumbents shall be considered as holding their terms of office from the 
State at large, 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. 2; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 2; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 146. The Supreme Court shall have such jurisdiction as properly 
belongs to a court of appeals. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 4; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 4.) 

The Supreme Court has no original jurisdiction; it may, how- 
ever, hear and determine all motions and issues necessary to the 
exercise of its appellate powers and necessary to the enforcement 
of its orders. Planters Insurance Co. v. Cramer, 47 Miss., 200; 
Brown v. Carraway, 47 Miss., 668. 

The Supreme Court has inherent power, upon reversal of a 
judgment, where the facts are shown of record, to award resti- 
tution to the party dispossessed under the judgment pending 
the appeal. Hall v. Wells, 54 Miss., 289, 306. 

The Supreme Court may affirm a judgment, right in its result, 
though the affirmance be on grounds not passed on by the lower 
court. Y. & M. V. R. R. Co. v. Adams, 81 Miss., 90 (32 So., 937). 

Sec. 147. No judgment or decree in any chancery or circuit cour:; 
rendered in a civil cause shall be reversed or annuled on the ground of 
want of jurisdiction to render said judgment or decree, from any error 
or mistake as to whether the cause in which it was rendered was of equity 
or common law jurisdiction; but if the Supreme Court shall find error in 
the proceedings other than as to jurisdiction, and it shall be necessary 
to remand the case, the Supreme Court may remand it to that court 
which, in its opinion, can best determine the controversy. 

Application of the section. Barrett v. Carter, 69 Miss., 593 
(13 So.. 625). 

The Supreme Court is not precluded by the section from 
reversing a decree enjoining a number of actions for the destruc- 
tion of property by fire on the idea of preventing a multiplicity 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1215 

of suits, the question in such case being merely as to the power 
of any court to join the parties in one suit. Tribette v. Illinois, 
etc., R. R. Co., 70 Miss., 182 (12 So., 32). 

The prohibition of the section is not confined to final judgments 
or decrees, but applies also to appeals from interlocutory ones 
where the question of jurisdiction is directly raised. Cazeneuve 
V. Curell, 70 Miss., 521 (13 So., 32). 

If the chancery court erroneously assume jurisdiction of an 
action of trespass the Supreme Court is powerless to interfere. 
lb. 

A judgment of the circuit court in favor of a claimant will 
not, under the section, be reversed because his title was only 
an equitable one. Goyer, etc., Co., v. Wildberger, 71 Miss., 
438 (15 So., 235). 

The section is not applicable to a decree appointing a receiver, 
void because made on the ex parte application of a debtor, such 
unauthorized proceeding not being a "cause" within its mean- 
ing. Whitney v. Bank, 71 Miss., 1009 (15 So., n). 

The section exempts decrees in chancery and judgments of 
the circuit court from collateral attack on the ground of want 
of jurisdiction as between equity and common law. lb. 

Where a chancery court entertains jurisdiction of a case the 
question whether it were or were not equitable in character does 
not arise, by \'irtue of the section, in the Supreme Court. Adams 
V. Bank, 74 Miss., 307 (20 So., 881). 

If the chancery court overrule a demurrer to a bill, raising 
the question of its jurisdiction, to subject specific property to 
the payment of a judgment at law, the record of which judgment 
has been destroyed, the Supreme Court cannot, under the 
section, review such question, there being no other error found 
in the record. Day v. Hartman, 74 Miss., 489 (21 So., 302). 

The circuit court having entertained jurisdiction of a suit, an 
action of ejectment, the Supreme Court cannot because of the 
section reverse its judgment, even if, by Sec. 160, the remedy 
iri the particular case should have been sought in the chancery 
court. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. LeBlanc, 74 Miss., 650 (21 
So., 760). 

The section deprives the Supreme Court alone of power; a 
chancery court may rightfully dismiss a cause the jurisdiction 
of which properly belongs to a court of law. CarboHneum, 
etc., Co. V. Meyer, 76 Miss., 586 (25 So., 297). 

The section does not apply to cases in which either the circuit 
or chancery court entertains a cause, being neither of equity or 
common law jurisdiction, of which it has no jurisdiction. Levee 
Commissioners v. Brooks, 76 Miss,, 635 (25 So., 358). 

Section cited in support of chancery jurisdiction. Atkinson 
V. Felder, 78 Miss., 83 (29 So., 767). 



1216 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

If a chancery court overrule a demurrer to a cross-bill, the 
Supreme Court cannot, under the section, reverse the decree 
because of any error or mistake as to whether the matters 
therein propounded be of equity or common law jurisdiction. 
Irion V. Cole, 78 Miss., 132 (28 So., 803). 

When a court of equity has taken jurisdiction of a proceed- 
ing to compel an agent to account for misappropriation of 
funds, its decree will not be disturbed on appeal on the ground 
that the complainant had a complete remedy at law. Decell 
V. Oil Mill, 83 Miss., 346 (35 So., 761). 
' " A decree in chancery will not be reversed on the ground 

merely that there was an adequate remedy at law. Hancock 
v. Dodge, 85 Miss., 228 (37 So., 711). 

On the reversal of a final decree in a cause of which the chan- 
[, eery court had no jurisdiction, instead of remanding the cause 

p' . to the court having jurisdiction the Supreme Court will dismiss 

[ . it, if it appears that the complainant has no cause of action. 

% Griffin V. Byrd, 74 Miss., 32 (19 So., 717). ' 

I' The Supreme Court is forbidden by this section to reverse a 

^ decree of the chancery court because of any error or mistake as to 

k whether the case was of equity or common law jurisdiction. 

I Hancock V. Dodge, 85 Miss., 228 (37 So., 711). 

I Under this section a personal judgment against the members 

p of a firm for a firm debt rendered in a suit to set aside alleged 

I- - fraudulent conveyances by them does not constitute reversible 
I error. Holmes v. Ferguson, 86 Miss,, 782 (39 So., 70), 

Sec. 148. The Supreme Court shall be held twice in each year at the 
seat of government, at such time as the Legislature may provide. 
\ (1832, Art. IV, Sec. 7; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 7.) 

.f Sec. 149. The term of office of the judges of the Supreme Court shall , 

^ be nine years. The office of one of said judges shall be vacated in three | 

I years, one in six years, and one in nine years, so that at the expiration ^' 

r of everv three vears one of said iudees shall be aooointed as aforesaid. f 



of every three years one of said judges shall be appointed as aforesaid. 

(1869, Art. IV, Sec. 3.) | 

Sec. 150. No person shall be eligible to the office of judge of the f 

Supreme Court who shall not have attained the age of thirty years at 
the time of his appointment, and who shall not have been a practicing 
attorney and a citizen of the State for five years immediately preceding 
such appointment. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 6: 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 6.) 

Sec. 151. All vacancies which may occur in said court from death' 
resignation, or removal shall be filled by appointment as aforesaid; but 
if a vacancy shall occur during the recess of the Legislature, the Governor 
shall appoint a successor, who shall hold his office until the end of the 
next session of the Senate, unless his nomination shall be sooner rejected. 
(1869, Art. VI, Sec. 5.) 






mr". 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1217 

Sec. 152. The Legislature shall divide the State into convenient 
circuit and chancery court districts. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 13; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 13.) 
The subject of legislative power to create new counties, divide 
counties into judicial districts, and remove seats of justice of 
such districts discussed. Hinton v. Perry Co., 84 Miss., 537 
(36 So., 565). 

Sec. 153. The judges of the circuit courts and of the chancery courts 
shall be appointed by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, and shall hold their offices for the term of four years. 
(1869, Art. VI, Sec. 11.) 

The Governor has no power, under this section, to appoint a 
judge to a full term upon the expiration of a preceding one dur- 
ing a recess of the Senate. Christian v. Gibbs, 53 Miss., 314. 
(See Sec. 177.) 

Sec. 154. No person shall be eligible to the office of judge of the 
circuit court or of the chancery court who shall not have been a practicing 
lawyer for five .years, and who shall not have attained the age of twenty- 
six years, and who shall not have been five years a citizen of this State. 
(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 12; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 12.). 
The official acts of a de facto judge are valid. Brady v. Howe, 
50 Miss., 607. 

Sec. 155. The judges of the several courts of this State shall, before 
they proceed to execute the duties of their respective offices, take the 

following oath or affirmation, to wit: "I, , solemnly swear 

[or affirm] that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and 
do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and 
impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me 
as according to the best of my ability and understanding, agree- 
ably to the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution and 
laws of the State of Mississippi. So help me God." 

Sec 156. The circuit court shall have original jurisdiction in all 
matters -civil and criminal in this State not vested by this Constitution 
in some other court, and such appellate jurisdiction as shall be prescribed 
by law. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 14; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 14.) 
The circuit court has jurisdiction w^here there is no other 
legal remedy. Madison Co. v, Alexander, Walker, 523; Planters 
Ins. Co. V. Cramer, 47 Miss., 200. 

Matters "civil" mean of common law nature. Bell v. West 
Point, 51 Miss., 262. 

The circuit court, on an appeal or certiorari from a justice ot 
the peace, has such jurisdiction only as the justice had. Glass 
v. Moss, 9 How. (Miss.), 519; Crapoo v. Grand Gulf, 9 Smed. 
& M., 205; Steir v. Surget, 10 Smed. & M., 154; Schofield v. 
39 



1218 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Persons, 26 Miss., 402; Askew v. Askew, 49 Miss., 301; Bell v. 
West Point, 51 Miss., 262, 

This rule does not apply in unlawful entry and detainer cases. 
Poston V. Mhoon, 49 Miss., 620. 

But the circuit court may consolidate several cases where 
the parties are the same on both sides, and a single judgment can 
settle the rights of all. Ammon v. Whitehead, 31 Miss., 99; 
Spratley v. Kitchens, 55 Miss., 578; McLendon v. Pass, 66 
Miss., no (5 So., 234). 

The principal of the amount in controversy at the time suit is 
brought, after deducting credits, if any, is the test of jurisdic- 
tion. Martin v. Harding, 52 Miss., 694. 

Garnishment is not an original suit, and the circuit court may 
issue and render judgment thereon for amounts within justice 
jurisdiction. Martin v. Harvey, 54 Miss., 685. 

A claimant's issue is not an original suit. Bernheimer v. 
- Martin, 66 Miss., 486 (6 So., 326). 

The original jurisdiction of the circuit court can be made by 
statute to embrace contested election causes. Hull v. Lyon, 
59 Miss., 218. 

Where jurisdiction is given to a court by the Constitution, it 
cannot be conferred exclusively on any other court by the 
Legislature. Montross v. State, 61 Miss., 429. 

The pleadings, where honest, fix and determine the amount in 
controversy. Fenn v. Harrington, 54 Miss., 733, 

Sec. 157. All causes that may be brought in the circuit court whereof 
the chancery court has exclusive jurisdiction shall be transferred to the 
chancery court. 

Sec. 158. A circuit court shall be held in each county at least twice 
in each year, and the judges of said courts may interchange circuits with 
each other in such manner as may be provided by law. 
(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 15; 1869. Art. VI, Sec. 15.) 
This section does not preclude the assignment of several 
judges to the same district. Price v, Anderson, 65 Miss., 410 
(4 So., 96). 

Notwithstanding the provisions of this section authorizing 
the Legislature to provide for the interchange of circuit judges, 
and notwithstanding the further fact that no similar constitu- 
tional provision respecting chancellors exists, Section 458 of the 
Code of 1892 (Code 1906, Sec. 507) is constitutional. First 
National Bank v. Block, 82 Miss., 197 (33 So., 849). 

Sec. 159. The chancery court shall have full jurisdiction in the 
following matters and cases, viz: 
(a) All matters in equity. 

(6) Divorce and alimony. \ 

(c) Matters testamentary and of administration. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1219 

(d) Minor's business. 

(e) Cases of idiocy, lunacy, and persons of unsound mind. 

(/) All cases of which the said court had jurisdiction under the laws 
in force when this Constitution is put in operation. 

(1832 third amendment; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 16.) 

"Full jurisdiction" indicates that where a court takes hold 
of a subject it ought to dispose of it fully and finally. Bank 
V. Duncan, 52 Miss., 740; Georgia R. R. Co. v. Brooks, -66 Miss., 
583 (6 So., 467); Eyrich v. Bank, 67 Miss., 6o (6 So., 615). 

(a) All matters- in equity. As a matter of necessity, in order 
to ascertain the boundaries of the jurisdiction of the courts, 
reference must be had to the system of jurisprudence prevalent 
at the time the constitution was adopted, and to the legislation 
of the State, with a view to which the framers of the Constitu- 
tion must be understood to have acted. Servis v. Beaty, 32 
Miss., 52. 

Equity is defined to be that system of justice which was 
administered by the High Court of Chancery in England. 
Smith v. Everett, 50 Miss., 575. 

The Legislature may confer on the chancery court jurisdiction 
of legal matters in aid of its authority over the principal matter 
of an equitable nature. Bank v. Duncan, 52 Miss., 740; Buie 
V. Pollock, 55 Miss., 309. 

Where suit is upon a note stipulating for an attorney's fee, 
if suit be necessary to collect it, in the chancery court, that 
court has fuU jurisdiction to fix the quantum of the fee and 
include it in the decree. Eyrich v. Bank, 67 Miss., 60 (6 So., 615). 

(d) Minor's business. The jurisdiction of the chancery court 
extends to the allowance of an attorney's fee out of an infant's 
estate for services rendered in the recovery of the estate. Epper- 
son V. Nugent, 57 Miss., 45. 

A court of chancery has jurisdiction to decree an account 
for profits and rents of land against a disseizor, where the 
complainants, or some of them, are_ infants. Carmichael v. 
Hunter, 4 How. (Miss.), 308; Wathen v. Glass, 54 Miss., 382. 

And so if the complainant be of unsound mind. Robinson 
V. Burritt, 66 Miss., 356 (6 So., 206). 

A complainant who has appealed from a decree denying his 
right to cancel his adversary's title to land may, under the 
section and the next one, enjoin his adversary, if insolvent, 
from cutting timber thereon, pending the appeal, the trees 
constituting its chief value. Woods v. Riley, 72 Miss., 73 (18 
So., 384). 

The section confers jurisdiction of bills by creditors without 
judgments to vacate fraudulent conveyances (Code 1880, 
§ 1843); nor is such jurisdiction affected by Sec. 31. McBride,,. . 
V. State Revenue Agent, 70 Miss., 716 (la So., 699). 



1220 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

i 

Although jurisdiction of minor's business is by this section I 

conferred on the chancery court, it still pertains to the Legis- " ; 

lature as parens patri(E to prescribe rules and regulations for the 
management, superintendence and disposition of the property 
of those under disabihty. Railroad Co. v. Blythe, 69 Miss., 
939 (11 So., III). 

Note: Sec. 532 of the Code is practically the counterpart 
of this section of the Constitution. Hence cases applicable to 
that section of the Code are applicable to the section of the 
Constitution. The annotations under that section of the Code 
should therefore be examined. 

Sec. 160. And in addition to the jurisdiction heretofore exercised by 
the chancery court in suits to try title and to cancel deeds and other 
clouds upon title to real estate, it shall have jurisdiction in such cases 
to decree possession, and to displace possession; to decree rents and 
compensation for improvements and taxes; and in all cases where said 
court heretofore exercised jurisdiction, auxiliary to courts of common 
law, it may exercise such jurisdiction to grant the relief sought, although 
the legal remedy may not have been exhausted or the legal title estab- 
lished by a suit at law. 

A complainant who has appealed from a decree denying his 
right to cancel his adversary's title to land may, under the sec- 
tion and the next one, enjoin his adversary, if insolvent, from 
cutting timber thereon, pending the appeal, the trees constituting 
its chief value. Woods v. Riley, 72 Miss., 73 (18 So., 384). 

The section dispenses with the necessity for exhausting legal 
remedies before invoking the jurisdiction of equity. Whitney 
. V. Bank, 71 Miss., 1009 (15 So., 33). 

The circuit court having entertained jurisdiction of a case the | 

remedy in which should have been sought, under the section, in I 

. the chancery court, its judgment will not be reversed because * 

of Sec. 147 by the Supreme Court. IlHnois, etc., R. R. Co. v. ' 

LeBlanc, 74 Miss., 650 (21 So., 760). 1 

The section does not confer jurisdiction on the chancery j 

court of a suit on the bond of a sheriff who has made an exces- 
sive levy under an attachment. Cazeneuve v. Curell. 70 Miss., \ 
521 (13 So., 32). j 

The section embraces only technical trusts, where a bond is 
required by law. Bernard v. Sykes, 72 Miss., 297 (iS So., 45^)- 
Sec. 161. And the chancery court shall have jurisdiction, con- 
current with the circuit court, of suits on bonds of fiduciaries and public 
officers for failure to account for money or property received, or wasted ^ 

or lost by neglect or failure to collect, and of suits involving inquiry into | 

matters of mutual accounts; but if the plaintiff brings his suit in the 
circuit court, that court^may, on application of the defendant, transfer 
the cause to the chancer>' court, if it' appear that the accounts to be 
investigated are mutual and complicated. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1221 

The section does not confer jurisdiction on the chancery 
court of a suit on the bond of a sheriff who has made an exces- 
sive levy under an attachment. Cazeneuve v. Curell, 70 Miss., 
521 (13 So., 32). 

The section embraces only technical trusts, where a bond is 
required by law. Barnard v. Sykes, 72 Miss., 297 (18 So., 450). 

Sec. 162. All causes that may be brought in the chancery court 
whereof the circuit court has exclusive jurisdiction shall be transferred 
to the circuit court. 

Sec. 163. The Legislature shall provide by law for the due certifica- 
tion of all causes that may be transferred to or from any chancery court 
or circuit court, for such reformation of the pleadings therein as may be 
necessary, and the adjudication of the costs of such transfer. 

Sec. 164. A chancery court shall be held in each county at least 
twice in each year. 

(1869, Art. VI, Sec. 17, and third amendment.) 

Sec. 165. No judge of any court shall preside on the trial of any 
cause where the parties or either of them shall be connected with him 
by affinity or consanguinity, or where he may be interested in the same, 
except by the consent of the judge and of the parties. Whenever any 
judge of the Supreme Court or the judge or chancellor of any district in 
this State shall, for any reason, be unable or disqualified to preside at 
any term of court, or in any case where the attorneys engaged therem 
shall not agree upon a member of the bar to preside in his place, the 
Governor may commission another, or others, of law knowledge to pre- 
side at such term or during such disability or disqualification in the place 
of the judge or judges so disqualified. Where either party shall desire, 
the Supreme Court, for the trial of any cause, shall be composed of three 
judges. No judgment or decree shall be affirmed by disagreement of 
two judges constituting a quorum. 
(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 9.) 
The section does not disqualify a judge because of a general 

interest in a public proceeding which he feels in common with 

the mass of citizens. Ferguson v. Brown, 75 Miss., 214 (21 

So., 603). 

The special judge appointed hereunder, and not the regular 

judge, must approve the stenographer's notes. Lopez v. 

Jackson, 79 Miss., 460 (31 So., 206). 

Sec. 166. The judges of the Supreme Court, of the circuit courts, 
and the chancellors shall receive for their services a compensation to be 
fixed by law, which shall not be increased or diminished during their 
continuance in office. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 10; 1869, Art. VI, Sees. 10 and 15.) 
The Legislature cannot, under the section, provide that the 
pay of a special judge shall be deducted from the salary of the 



- 1222 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

regular judge in \rhose stead he has served. Holder v. Sykes, 
77 Miss., 64 (24 So., 261). 

Sec. 167. All civil officers shall be conservators of the peace, and 
shall be by law vested with ample power as such. 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. 12; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 22; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. 22.) ' • 

Sec. 168. The clerk of the Supreme Court shall be elected as other 
State officers, for the term of four years, and the clerk of the circuit 
court and the clerk of the chancery court shall be selected in each county 
in the manner provided by law, and shall hold office for the term of four 
years, and the Legislature shall provide by law what duties shall be 
performed during vacation by the clerks of the circuit and chancery 
courts, subject to the approval of the court. 
(1869, Art. VI, Sec. 19.) 
- , The statute (Code 1880, Sec. 396; Code 1892, Sec. 3051; Code 
1906, Sec. 3458) did not apply, under Sec. 16, Art. VI, Constitu- 
tion of 1869, to the terms of the clerks of the circuit and chanc- 
ery courts. Andrews v. Covington, 69 Miss., 740 (13 So., 853). 

Sec. 169. The style of all process shall be "The State of Mississippi," 
and all prosecutions shall be carried on in the name and by authority of 
the "State of Mississippi," and all indictments shall conclude "against 
the peace and dignity of the State." 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. 13; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 17; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. 18.) 

The section refers to criminal prosecutions for the violation of 
State laws, and not for the violation of town ordinances. 
Alexander v. To\nti Council, 54 Miss., 659. 

An affidavit for the prosecution of an offender is fatally defec- 
tive when it fails to conclude as required by the section. Love 
V. State, 8 So., 465. 

An indictment not so concluding is void. State v. Morgan, 
79 Miss., 659; Miller v. State, 81 Miss., 162 (32 So., 951). 



Sec. 170. Each county shall be divided into live districts. A resitient 

freeholder of each district shall be selected, in the manner prescribed by 

law, and the five so chosen shall constitute the board of supervisors of 

the county, a majority of whom may transact business. The board of 1 

supervisors shall have full jurisdiction over roads, ferries, and bridges, t 

to be exercised in accordance with such regulations as the Legislature j 

may prescribe, and perform such other duties as may be required by j 

law. The clerk of the chancery court of each county shall be clerk of ' 

the board of supervisors. | 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 20 and second amendment; 1869, Art. VI, j 

Sec. 20.) I 

The board can do valid acts only as empowered by law. Howe I 

V. State, 53 Miss., 57. ) 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1223 

The jurisdiction over roads, ferries and bridges can be regu- 
lated by law, but it cannot be taken away. Board v. Arrighi, 
54 Miss., 668; Paxton v. Baum, 59 Miss., 531; Seal v. Donnelly, 
60 Miss., 658. 

History of legislation, constitutional and statutory, relating 
to the jurisdiction of the board of supervisors reviewed. Mon- 
roe County V. Strong, 78 Miss., 565 (29 So., 530). 

The Legislature may invest the boards of supervisors with the 
right to regulate the taking of fish in their respective counties. 
Ex parte Fritz, 86 Miss., 210 (38 So., 722). 

Sec. 171. A competent number of justices of the peace and constables 
shall be chosen in each county in the manner provided by law, for each 
district, who shall hold their office for the term of four years. No person 
shall be eligible to the otfice of justice of the peace who shall not have 
resided two years in the district next preceding his selection. The juris- 
diction of justices of the peace shall extend to causes in which the prin- 
cipal amount in controversy shall not exceed the sum of two hundred 
dollars; and they shall have jurisdiction concurrent \\dth the circuit 
court over all crimes whereof the punishment prescribed does not extend 
beyond a fine and imprisonment in the county jail; but the Legislature 
may confer on the justices of the peace exclusive jurisdiction in such 
petty misdemeanors as it shall see proper. In all causes tried by a 
justice of the peace, the right of appeal shall be secured under such rules 
'and regulations as shall be prescribed by law, and no justice of the peace 
shall preside at the trial of any cause where he may be interested, or the 
parties or either of them shall be connected with him by affinity or con- 
sanguinity, except by the consent of the justice of the peace and of the 
parties. 

(181 7, Art. V, Sec. 8; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 23; 1869, Art. VI, 

Sec. 23.) 

An account, though embracing various items, cannot be 

divided so as to give jurisdiction. Grayson v. Williams, Walker, 

298; Pittman v. Chrisman, 59 Miss., 124. 

But plaintifi need not embrace in the same suit independent 

causes of action, though all may be due. Ash v. Lee, 51 Miss., 

loi; Pittman v. Chrisman, 59 Miss., 124; McLendon v. Pass, 66 

Miss., no (5 So., 234); Drysdale v. Biloxi, etc., 67 Miss., 534 

(7 So., 541). - . 

The following cases on the subject are expressly ovem.iled. 

Schofield V. Pensons, 26 Miss., 402; Mobile R. R. Co. v. State, 

51 Miss., 137; and it seems Morris v. Shryock, 50 Miss., 590, 
~ In computing the amount in controversy, costs, damages, and 

interest are excluded. Xew Orleans R. R. Co. v. Evans, 49 Miss., 

785; Jackson v. Whitfield, 51 Miss., 202. 

The justices of the peace have jurisdiction to try claimant's 

issue although the value of the property exceeds two hundred 

dollars. Bernheimer v. Martin, 66 Miss., 486 (6 So., 326). 



1224 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

The amount in controversy is not limited to actions on con- 
tracts. Bell V. West Point, 51 Miss., 262; Higgins v. DeLoach, 
54 Miss., 498. 

In suits upon penal bonds, jurisdiction is determined by the 
amount of damages honestly claimed. Shattuck v. Miller, '50 
Miss., 386; State v. Lucky, 51 Miss., 528. 

In regulating appeals from justice courts, the Legislature 
cannot discriminate against classes of litigants. Chicago R. R. 
Co. V. Moss., 60 Miss., 641. 

The Legislature cannot confer on the mayor of a municipality 
jurisdiction as a justice of the peace outside of municipal limits. 
Heggie v. Stone, 70 Miss., 39 (12 So., 253), 

The section, as to jurisdictional amount, became operative 
upon the adoption of the Constitution and was not suspended by 
.Sec. 274,- Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. Brookhaven, etc., Co., 71 
Miss., 663 (16 So., 252). 

Neither the jurisdiction of justices of the peace, nor the execu- 
tive power of constables, can be extended beyond the district 
for which they were elected. Riley v. James, 73 Miss., i (18 
So., 930). 

Under the section, a justice of the peace has jurisdiction of a 
suit against a carrier by a person who has shipped freight by it, 
a part of which belongs to him and a part to others, to recover 
damages which he has suffered, if they do not exceed two 
hundred dollars, although the entire shipment was made under 
one contract with him and the damages to all the property exceed 
said sum. Waters v. Mobile, etc., R. R. Co., 74 Miss., 534 
(21 So., 240), 

The courts hereby authorized are distinct from those author- 
ized by Sec. 172. Hughes v. State, 79 Miss., 77 (29 So., 786). 
. If the amount of a judgment in a justice's court in another 
State and the costs of the suit therein paid by the plaintiff 
exceed two hundred dollars, the circuit court has jurisdiction 
of a suit for the aggregate amount brought in this State. Mc- 
Dugle v. Filmer, 82 Mis^., 200 (34 So., 152). 

Sec. 172. The Legislature shall, from time to time, establish such other 
inferior courts as may be necessary, and abolish the same whenever 
deemed expedient. 

(1832, Art. IV, Sec. 24; 1869, Art. VI, Sec. 24.) 
It is competent, under the section, for the Legislature to give 
a mayor of a municipahty jurisdiction of causes, civil and 
criminal, within the municipality. Bell v. McKinney, 63 Miss., 
187. 

A police justiceship is authorized by this section. Hughes v. 
State, 79 Miss., 77 (29 So., 786). 
Sec. 173. There shall be an Attorney-General elected at the same 
time and in the same manner as the Governor is elected, whose term of 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1225 

office shall be four years and whose compensation shall be fixed by law. 
The qualifications for the Attorney-General shall be the same as herein 
prescribed for judges of the circuit and chancery courts. 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 25; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. 25.) 

Sec. 174. A district attorney for each circuit court district shall be 
selected in the manner provided by law, whose term of office shall be 
four years, whose duties shall be prescribed by law, and whose com- 
pensation shall be a fixed salary. 

(1817, Art. V, Sec. 14; 1832, Art. IV, Sec. 25; 1869, Art. VI, 
Sec. 25.) 

The Legislature cannot, directly or indirectly, abridge the 
terms of office of the district attorneys. Fant v. Gibbs, 54 
Miss. ,'396. 

The section does not prevent the Legislature from authorizing 
deductions from the salaries of district attorneys for neglect of i 

official duty, whether from sickness or other cause. The word ] 

"fixed" in the section simply marks the change made by the I 

Constitution in the compensation of district attorneys from a j 

system of fees and salaries to one of salaries alone. Cole v. i 

Humphries, 78 Miss., 163 (28 So., 808). 1 



Sec. 175. All pubHc officers, for willful neglect of duty or misde- 
meanor in office, shall be liable to presentment or indictment by a giand 
jury; and, upon conviction, shall be removed from office, and otherwise 
punished as may be prescribed by law. 

The penalty prescribed is mandatory. Shattuck v. State, 
SI Miss., 575. 

The method of removal is exclusive. Runnel v. State, 
Walker, 146; Hyde v. State, 52 Miss., 665; ex parte Lehman, 
60 Miss., 967. 

Sec. 176. No person shall be a member of the board of supervisors 
who is not a resident freeholder in the district for which he is chosen. 
The value of real estate necessary to be owned to qualify persons in the 
several counties to be members of said board shall be fixed, by law. 

Sec. 177. The Governor iihall have power to fill any vacancy which 
may happen during the recess of the Senate in the office of judge or 
chancellor, by making a temporary appointment of an incumbent, which 
shall expire at the end of the next session of the Senate, unless a successor 
shall be sooner appointed and confirmed by the Senate. When a tem- 
porary appointment of a judge or chancellor has been made during the 
recess of the Senate, the Governor shall have no power to remove the 
person or appointee, nor power to -withhold his name from the Senate 
for their action. 



1226 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

ARTICLE VII. 

CORPORATIONS. 

Sec. 178. Corporations shall be formed under general laws only. 
The Legislature shall have power to alter, amend, or repeal any charter 
of incorporation now existing and revocable, and any that may hereafter 
be created, whenever, in its opinion, it may be for the public interest to 
do so. Provided, however, That no injustice shall be done to the stock- 
holders. No charter for any private corporation for -oecuniary gain shall 
be granted for a longer period than ninety-nine years. In assessing for 
taxation the property and franchises of corporations having charters for 
a longer period than ninety-nine years, the increased value of such prop- 
erty and franchises arising from such longer duration of their charters 
shall be considered arid assessed; but any such corporation shall have the 
right to surrender the excess over ninety-nine years of its charter. 

Sec. 179. The Legislature shall never remit the forfeiture of the 
franchise of any corporation now existing, nor alter nor amend the charter 
thereof, nor pass any general or special law for the benefit of such cor- 
poration, except upon the condition that such corporation shall there- 
after hold its charter and franchises subject to the provisions of this 
Constitution; and the reception by any corporation of any provision of 
any such laws, or the taking of any benefit or advantage from the same, 
shall be conclusively held an agreement by such corporation to hold 
thereafter its charter and franchises under the provisions hereof. 

This section is violated by Chapter 89, Acts of 1902, and this 

act is not saved by Sec. 89, Constitution of 1890. Yazoo R. 

Co. v. Southern R. Co., 8^ Miss., 746 (36 So., 74). 

Sec. 180. All existing charters or grants of corporate franchise under 
which organizations have not in good faith taken place at the adoption of 
this Constitution shall be subject to the provisions of this article ; and all 
such charters under which organizations shall not take place in good 
faith and business be commenced within one year from the adoption of 
this Constitution, shall thereafter have no validity; and every charter 
or grant of corporate franchise hereafter made shall have no validity, 
unless an organization shall take place thereunder and business be com- 
menced within two years from the date of such charter or grant. 

Both the right to exist as a corporation and the power to 
consolidate with another corporation are within the section. 
Adams v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co., 77 Miss., 194 (24 So., 200); 
- Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. Adams, 180 U. S., i. 

An exemption from taxation contained in a charter of a railroad 
company, which afterwards loses its corporate existence by con- 
solidation with another company, was cut off by the section, 
not\\-ithstanding the charter provided that the exemptions 
should pass to the consolidated company. Adams v. Yazoo, etc., 
R. R. Co., 77 Miss., 194 (24 So., 200); Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. 
Adams, 180 U. S., x. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1227 

Sec. i8i. The property of all private corporations for pecuniary gain 
shall be taxed in the same way and to the same extent as the property 
of individuals, but the Legislature may provide for the taxation of banks 
and banking capital, by taxing the shares according to the value thereof 
(augmented by the accumulations, surplus, and unpaid dividends), 
exclusive of real estate, which shall be taxed as other real estate. Exemp- 
tions from taxation to which corporations are legally entitled at the 
adoption of this Constitution, shall remain in full force and effect for the 
time of such exemptions as expressed in their respective charters, or by 
general laws, unless sooner repealed by the Legislature. And domestic 
insurance companies shall not be required to pay a greater tax in the 
aggregate than is required to be paid by foreign insurant:e companies 
doing business in this State, except to the extent of the excess of their - 
ad valorem tax over the privilege tax imposed upon such foreign com- 
panies; and the Legislature may impose privilege taxes on building and 
loan associations in lieu of all other taxes except on their real estate. ] 

(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 13.) 1 

Domestic insurance companies are protected by the sectfc>n j 

against an aggregation of taxes, whether State, county or i 

municipal, in excess of the taxes required of foreign insurance '| 

companies doing business in this State, until their assets becomie i 

sufficient to yield an ad valorem tax, which, added to the priv- i 

ilege tax, will exceed the tax required of such foreign companies. j 

Brennan v. Mississippi, etc., Co., 70 Miss., 531 (13 So., 228). 
The section defeated the exemption of the Natchez, Jackson 
& Columbus Railroad Company. The case of Natchez, etc., 
R. R. Co. V. Lambert, 70 Miss., 779 (13 So., ^t,), announcing the 
contrary, overruled. Adams v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co., 77 
Miss., 194 (24 So., 200). 

The Constitution of 1869 (Art. 12, Sec. 13), together with 
Sec. 20, .same article, was mandatory and deprived the Legisla- 
ture of all power to exempt the property of corporations for 
pecuniary profits from taxation. Mississippi Mills v. Cook, 
56 Miss., 40, and Natchez, etc., R. R. Co. v. Lambert, 70 Miss., 
779 (13 So., 33), overruled. Adams v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co^ 
77 Miss., 194 (24 So., 200). 

A new corporation resulting from a consolidation of two rail- 
road companies, since the adoption of the Constitution pro- 
hibiting exemptions, is not entitled to an exemption from 
taxation contained in the charter of one of the consolidating 
companies, although such charter was granted prior to the adop- 
tion of the Constitution. Adams v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co., I 

i 

77 Miss., 194 (24 So., 200); Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. Adams, 
180 U. S., I. 

The exemption from taxation granted by Laws 1882, p. 84, 
to encourage the establishment of factories, etc., was and is 
constitutional, and was continued in force, subject to legislative 
repeal, by the section. Adams v. Tombigbee Mills, 78 Miss., 676 
(29 So., 470). 



1228 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Sec. 182. The power to tax corporations and their property shall 
never be surrendered or abridged by any contract or grant to which the 
State or any political subdivision thereof may be a party, except that the 
Legislature may grant exemption from taxation in the encouragement of 
manufacturers and other new enterprises of public utility extending for 
a period not exceeding five years, the time of such exemptions to com- 
mence from date of charter, if to a corporation; and if to an individual 
enterprise, then from the commencement of work; but when the Legis- 
lature grants such exemptions for a period of five years or less, it shall 
be done by general laws, which shall distinctly enumerate the classes of 
manufactures and other new enterprises of pubhc utility entitled to such 
exemptions, and shall prescribe the mode and manner in which the right 
to such exemptions shall be determined. 

Sec. 183. No county, city, town, or other municipal corporation 
shall hereafter become a subscriber to the capital stock of any railroad 
or other corporation or association, or make appropriation, or loan its 
credit in aid of such corporation or association. All authority heretofore 
conferred for any of the purposes aforesaid by the Legislature or by the 
charter of any corporation, is hereby repealed. Nothing in this section 
contained shall affect the right of any such corporation, municipality, or 
county to make such subscription where the same has been authorized 
under laws existing at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, and 
by a vote of the people thereof, had prior to its adoption, and where the 
terms of submission and subscription have been or shall be complied 
with, or to prevent the issue of renewal bonds, or the use of such other 
means as are or may be prescribed by law for the payment or liquidation 
of such subscription, or of any existing inbedtedness. 

A municipality is not forbidden by the section to contract with 
a corporation for electric lights for its streets. Reid v. Trow- 
bridge, 78 Miss., 542 (29 So., 167). 

Under the section, a municipahty cannot make an appro- 
priation of money in aid of a corporation, whether the money i 
belongs to it in a pubhc or private capacity, even if it accrued by j 
a contractor's forfeiture and be in the hands of a custodian and I 
never have been in the treasury. Adams v. .Jackson, etc., ; 
Ry. Co., 78 Miss., 887 (30 So., 58). * | 
This section forbids the donation by a municipality to an j 
association which has completed work of another of a fund de- : 
posited by the former and forfeited. Jackson Ry., etc., v. 
Adams, Rev. Agt., 79 Miss., 408 (30 So., 694). 
Sec. 184. All railroads which carry persons or property for hire shall 
be public highways, and all railroad companies so engaged shall be 
common carriers. Any company orgvanized for that purpose under the ] 
laws of the State shall have the right to construct and operate a railroad 
between any points within this State, and to connect at the State line j 
with roads of other states. Every railroad company shall have the j 
right with its road to intersect, connect with, or cross any other railroad; i 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE Of][mISSISSIPPI. 1229 

5ind all railroad compa'nies shall receive and transport each other's 
passengers, tonnage, and cars, loaded or empty, without unnecessary 
delay or discrimination. 

The section does not require railroads to receive and transport 
foreign cars obviously defective and dangerous to its employes, 
nor exempt them from liability to employes for injuries sustained 
because of the defective or unsafe condition of machinery and 
_ appliances on foreign cars received without inspection, nor 
exempt them from such liability where by inspection the defects 
or dangerous condition could have been discovered. Illinois, etc. 
R. R. Co. V. Price, 72 Miss., 862 (18 So., 415). 

Sec. 185. The rolling-stock belonging to any railroad company or 
corporation in this State shall be considered personal property, and 
shall be liable to execution and sale as such. 

Sec. 186. The Legislature shall pass laws to prevent abuses, unjust 
discrimination, and extortion in all charges of express, telephone, sleep- 
ing-car, telegraph, and railroad companies, and shall enact laws for the 
supervision of railroads, express, telephone, telegraph, sleeping-car 
companies, and other common carriers in this State, by commission or 
otherwise, and shall provide adequate penalties, to the extent, if neces- 
sary for that purpose, of forfeiture of their franchises. 

Sec. 187. No railroad hereafter constructed in this State shall pass 
within three miles of any county seat without passing through the same, 
and establishing and maintaining a depot therein, unless prevented by 
natural obstacles; Provided, Such town or its citizens shall grant the right 
of way through its limits, and sufficient grounds for ordinary depot 
purposes. 

The words "county seat" mean the municipality at which the 
county seat is located according to its boundaries when the road 
is constructed. State v. Railroad Co., 86 Miss., 172 (38 So., 
732). 

The words ''natural obstacles" mean such obstacles as cannot 
reasonably be overcome, and neither increased cost nor greater 
engineering difficulties will of themselves excuse non-perform- 
ance of the duty. lb. 

It is no excuse for failing to build through a county seat that 
the railroad company has not been tendered a conveyance of the 
right of way and depot grounds, unless it shows that it made a 
demand therefor which was refused. lb. 

A county seat is not required to furnish a right of way and 
depot grounds to a railroad already built to it, upon its exten- 
sion from it. lb. 

Nor is a county seat, which is a terminus of a road already con- 
structed, required to furnish a right of way and depot grounds 
for an extension of the road. lb. 



1230 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

i Sec, 1 88. No railroad or other transportation company shall grant 

[free passes or tickets, or passes or tickets at a discount, to members of 

(the Legislature, or any State, district, county or municipal officers, except 

! railroad commissioners. The Legislature shall enact suitable laws for 

the detection, prevention, and punishment of violations of this provision. 

Sec. 189. All charters granted to private corporations in this State 

shall be recorded in the chancery clerk's office of the county in which 

the principal office or place of business of such company shall be located. 

For a case of liabihty where the charter was not recorded as 

required by the section, see Kelly v. State, 68 Miss., 343 (8 So., 

745)- 

Partners who organize as a corporation, continuing the busi- 
ness in the same name, are personally liable to one with whom 
they had dealt as a partnership for goods purchabed by the 
corporation without actual notice of the change, where the 

[ charter is not recofded as required. Perkins v. Rouss, 78 Miss., 

j 343 (29 So., 92). 

[ Sec. 190. The exercise of the right of eminent domain shall never be 
[abridged, or so construed as to prevent the Legislature from taking the 
[property and franchises of incorporated companies, and subjecting them 
ito public use; and the exercise of the police powers of the State shall 
j never be abridged, or so construed as to permit corporations to conduct 
I" their business in such manner as to infringe upon the rights of individuals 
I or general well-being of the State. 

[• Sec. 4046, prohibiting running, flying, walking or kicking 

switches within the limits of a municipality and making a rail- 
road company liable for damages sustained thereby without 
regard to contributory negligence of the person injured is a 
legitimate exercise of the police power. Jones v. Railroad Co., 
L 72 Miss., 22 (16 So., 379). 

Sec. 4058, requiring -railroads to construct and maintain 
stock gaps and cattle-guards is a legitimate exercise of the 
poHce power. Railroad Co. v. Spencer, 72 Miss., 491 (17 So., 
. 168). 

A telegraph company engaged in domestic as well as inter- 
state business is siibject to such reasonable police regulations as 
the State may impose. Telegraph Co. v. Railroad Com., 74 
Miss., 80 (21 So., 15). 

Sec. 4053, providing that when a railroad is constructed so 
as to cross a highway, and a bridge is necessary for passage 
across the railroad, it shall be the duty of the railroad company 
, to erect and maintain the bridge, is within the police power of the 
State. Railroad Co. v. Copiah Co., 81 Miss., 6S5 i:^^ So., 502). 
Sec. 4058, making it the duty of railroad companies to maintain 
proper cattle-guards where their tracks pass through enclosed 
land, is a legitimate exercise of police power. Railroad v. Har- 
rington, 85 Miss., 374 (37 So., ioi6). 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1231 

Sec. 191. The Legislature shall provide for the protection of the 
employes of all corporations doing business in this State from inter- 
ference with their social, civil, or political rights by said corporations, 
their agents or employes. 

Sec. 192. Provision shall be made by general laws whereby cities 
and towns may be authorized to aid and encourage the establishment of 
manttfactories, gas-works, water-works, and other enterprises of public 
utility other than railroads, within the limits of said cities or towns, by 
exempting all property used for such purposes from municipal taxation 
for a period not longer than ten years. 

Sec 193. Every employe of any railroad corporation shall have the 
same right and remedies for any injury suffered by him from the act or 
omission of said corporation or its employes, as are allowed by lavv* to 
other persons not employes where the injury results from the negligence 
of a superior agent or ofi&cer, or of a person having the right to control 
or direct the services of the party injured, and also when the injury results 
from the negligence of a fellow-servant engaged in another department 
of labor from that of the party injured, or of a fellow-servant on another 
train of cars, or one engaged about a different piece of work. Knowl- 
edge by any employe injured, of the defective or unsafe character or con- 
dition of any machinery, ways, or appliances, shall be no defense to an 
action for injury caused thereby, except as to conductors or engineers in 
charge of dangerous or unsafe cars, or engines voluntarily operated by 
them. "Where death ensues from any injury to employes, the legal or 
personal representatives of the person injured shall have the same right 
and remedies as are allowed by law to such representatives of other 
persons. Any contract or agreement, express or implied, made by any 
employe to waive the benefit of this section shall be null and void; and 
this section shall not be construed to deprive any employe of a corpora- 
tion, or his legal or personal representative, of any right or remedy that 
he now has by the law of the land. The Legislature may extend the 
remedies herein provided for to any other class of employes. 

The section does not aid a plaintiff in the absence of evidence 
that the injury' resulted from the negligence of a "superior agent 
or officer, or of a person having the right to control or direct the 
services" of the party injured, or of a "fellow-servant engaged 
in another department of labor." Short v. New Orleans, etc., 
R. R. Co.. 69 Miss., 848 (13 So., 826). 

The section abolishes the defence of contributory negligence 
in the actions to which it applies, imless the negligence of the 
** employe be willful or reckless. Welsh v. Alabama, etc., Ry. 
Co., 70 Miss., 20 (11 So., 723). 

The section had no retroactive effect. Illinois, etc., R. R. 
Co. v. Cathey, 70 Miss., 332 (12 So., 253). 

The engineer is not the superior agent or officer, or "person 
having the right to control or direct the services" of brakemen 



1232 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

i. on same train, with the section. Evans v. Louisville, etc., 

f Ry. Co., 70 Miss., 527 (12 So., 581). 

f Only the executor or administrator, "the legal or personal 

f" representative," can sue under the section for the death of an 

r employe [decided before legislation on the subject after the 

I adoption of the Constitution, save Code 1892 § 3559]. IlHnois, 

I etc., R. R. Co. v. Hunter, 70 Miss., 471 (12 So., 482). 

I. A fireman on a locomotive and a telegraphic operator at a 

f railroad station are engaged in different departments of labor 

I or "about a different piece of work," within the meaning of the 

\ section. lb. 

i;- • A brakejnan who violates a rule of the railroad company, 

I -- although acting in so doing by order of the conductor, who had 
r "the right to control or direct his services," within the meaning 

i of the section, cannot recover for injuries received because of 

i so doing, since he was under no obligation to obey an order to 

[ violate a rule binding alike on him and the conductor. Rich- 

[ mond R. Co. v. Rush, 71 Miss., 987 (15 So., 133). 

I That part of the section providing that "knowledge by an 

r employe injured of the defective or imsafe character or condi- 

f. tion of any machinery, ways or appliances shall not be a de- 

f fense," etc., has no application to a case where a defective car, 

|, ■ not used by the company in its business, but which has been con- 

I demned to the repair shops, has safely reached the station of its 

'^- .destination and is being transferred to the shops, when an 

P employe in handling it is injured; and it is immaterial that the 

; car might have been left at shops on the route nearer the place of 

starting. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. Bowles, 71 Miss., 1003 
(15 So.. 138). 

An action cannot be maintained, based on the section, by an 
administrator of a deceased employe lor injuries causing the 
death of the intestate if the death was instantaneous. McVey, 
admx., V. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co., 73 Miss., 487 (19 So., 209). 
The section does not destroy the defense of contributory negli- 
gence. It merely abrogates the previous rule that knowledge 
of the defects and dangers was, of itself, a bar. Buckner v. 
Richmond, etc., R. R. Co., 72 Miss., 873 (i3 So., 449)- 

Engineers and conductors in charge of dangerous or unsafe 
cars or engines, voluntarily operated by them, are exempted 
from the section. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. Guess, 74 Miss., 



170 (21 So., 50). 



t The section having modified the fellow-servant rule in partu 

[ and authorized the legislature to further modify it, thereby 

recognized so much of it as has not been abrogated by it or 
subsequent legislation. Farquhar v. Alabama, etc., Ry- ^^f 
78 Miss., 193 (28 So., 850). 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1233 

The engineer of a switch engine is not a superior agent or 
officer of the railway company to a yardmaster of the same 
company within the section. lb. 

Statutes cannot be enacted under this section authorizing 
employes of a corporation to recover when employes of indi- 
viduals, etc., similarly situated, cannot. Such statutes must 
be based on some difference inherent in the nature of the busi- 
ness, which difference serves as a basis for and warrants the 
classification. Ballard v. Oil Co., 8i Miss., 507 (34 So., 533). 

Such statutes cannot be saved where the language applies to 
employes of all corporations, by construing it to apply only to 
corporations engaged in a hazardous business ; this is not sever- 
ance between constitutional and unconstitutional provisions, 
but judicial legislation. lb. 

Where a statute contains on its face the boundaries by 
which severance can be made between non-interdependent 
clauses, the court may sever; but the court cannot make such 
.severance by construing the act, according to the evidence in 
each case, as falling within or without.^ lb. 

Under this section and § 3559 of the Code of 1892 (Code 1906, 
Sec. 4056, a declaration in a suit by a fireman charging that he 
was injured by the negligence of the engineer, being a superior 
having the right to control plaintiff's services, the declaration 
being in the language of the statute, is not demurrable. Cheaves 
v. Southern Ry. Co., 82 Miss., 48 (34 So., 385). 

" Whether one servant is under the direction of another servant 
within the meaning of this section, is not to be determined by 
the rules of the railroad company ; it should be determined always 
by the facts in the case and the nature of the act performed. 
By looking to the facts surrounding the act itself and the actual 
relation of the two servants to the act, the rules of the company 
in such case are competent evidence, but are simply evidence 
at last, and where the rules and the actual facts conflict as to 
whether the servant has the right to control and direct, the 
facts, and not the rules, govern. lb. 

This section provides not only that a "superior agent" is not a 
fellow servant of those over whom he is such superior agent, but 
it also expressly declares "that any person having the right to 
control or direct the services of the party injured" is not a 
fellow servant of such person. In such a case the question is 
not whether the duties are "routine duties bom of the occa- 
sion," as said in the Evans case, but the question was merely 
whether the person suing has been injured by the negligence of 
another servant having the right to control or direct his services. 
(Evans case, 70 Miss., 529, disapproved.) lb. 

This section has no application to an action based on the negli- 
gence of the railroad company itself, that is to say, the master. 



I 1234 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

[ 

I in failing to provide a safe roadbed. Gulf R. Co. v. Bussey, 

[. 82 Miss., 616 (35 So., 166). 

i The employe's right to recover is not limited to cases where 

I he is injured whilst executing at the very time of his injury some 

»• special command given by his superior officer, but he is entitled 

[ to recover if injured by the negligence of a superior officer 

I. whether he is at the time obeying any special command or 

L engaged merely in the discharge of his ordinary duties. South- 

t ern Ry. Co. v. Cheaves, 82 Miss., 48 (36 So., 691). 

Liability of a railroad company for injuries caused by defec- 
tive machinery or appliances exists independently of this sec- 
tion and rests on its common law duty to furnish employes 
safe machinery and appliances. Failure in this regard is the 
negligence of the company and not of its employes. White v. 
t; Railroad, 72 Miss., 12 (16 So., 248). 

p It is only w^here an employe is killed through the negligence 

[- of a fellow servant that under this section an action therefor 

L must be brought by the personal representative. lb. 

I . This section created the rights and causes of action it pro- 

\ vides for. Causes of action were created that had never before 

l~.- existed. Bussey v. Railroad Co., 79 Miss., 608 (31 So., 212). 

1^. It w^as competent for the Legislature to extend the remedies 

f, as to w^ho could sue for the assertion of the rights provided in this 



section. lb. 

See Railroad Cosipany v. Schraag, 84 Miss., 125 (36 So., 193). 

A cause of action arising from the negligence of a fellow 
servant, based on this section, cannot be joined in the same 
count with a cause of action predicated of the master's negli- 
gence in failing to furnish his servant a safe place in which to 
work. Railroad v. Abrams, 84 Miss., 456 (36 So., 542). 
- A railroad employe injured by the negligence of a superior 
officer or agent having the right to direct his services can recover, 
although his injuries were not received when executing some 
special command or order, but while engaged in the discharge 
of his ordinary" duties, and when such officer or agent was 
engaged in discharging only the ordinary duties of his station. 
Railroad v. Cheaves, 84 Miss., 565 (36 So., 691). 

Note: See also in connection with the annotations under 
this section those made under Sec. 4056 of the Code. 

Sec. 194. The Legislature shall provide, by law, that in all elections 
for directors or managers of incorporated companies every stockholder 
shall have the right to vote, in person or by proxy, the number of shares 
of stock owned by him for as many persons as there are directors or 
managers to be elected, or to cumulate said shares so as to give one 
candidate as many votes as the number of directors multiplied by the 
number of his shares of stock shall equal, or to distribute them on the 
same principle among as many candidates as he shall see lit; and such 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1235 

directors or managers shall not be elected in any other manner; but no 
person who is engaged or interested in a competing business, either 
individually or as employe or stockholder, shall serve on any board of 
directors of any corporation without the consent of a majority in interest 
of the stockholders thereof. 

Sec. 195. Express, telegraph, telephone, and sleeping-car companies 
are declared common carriers in their respective lines of business, and 
subject to liability as such. 

-A telegraph company, engaged in domestic as well as interstate 
business, is subject to such reasonable police regulations as the 
State may impose. Western, etc., Co. v. Missis.sippi Railroad 
Commission, 74 Miss., 8d (21 So., 15). 

The section does not relieve a sleeping car company from liabil- 
ity to a privilege tax even if its local business be done at a losy 
and the tax has to be paid from its interstate business. . Pullman 
Co. V. Adams, 78 Miss., 814 (30 So., 757). 
• . The stipulation on the back of a telegraph message that the 
company will not be liable beyond the charge paid for trans- 
mission for mistake in unrepeated messages or errors in trans- 
mitting cipher messages is unavailing as a defense, since this 
section makes telegraph companies common carriers and liable 
as such. Postal Co. v. Wells, 82 Miss., 733 (35 So., 190). 

This section making telegraph companies common carriers, 
and the holding of our Supreme Court that they cannot contract 
against their own negligences, does not affect the validity or 
invalidity of contracts made by them in Massachusetts. Shaw 
V. Cable Co., 79 Miss., 683 (31 So., 222). 

Under this section it is the duty of sleeping-car companies 
to notify passengers when they have reached their destination, 
and to afford them reasonable opportunity to alight. Pullman 
Co. V. Kelley, 86 Miss., 87 (38 So., 317). 

Sec. 196. No transportation corporation shall issue stocks or bonds 
except for money, labor done (or in good faith agreed to be done), or 
money or property actually received; and all fictitious increase of stock 
or indebtedness shall be void. 

Sec. 197. The Legislature shall not grant to any foreign corporation 
or association a license to build, operate, or lease any railroad in this 
State; but in all cases where a railroad is to be built or operated, and the 
same shall be partly in this State and partly in another State or in other 
States, the owners or projectors thereof shall first become incorporated 
under the laws of this State ; nor shall any foreign corporation or associa- 
tion lease or operate any railroad in this State, or purchase the same or 
any interest therein. Consolidation of any railroad lines and corpora- 
tions in this State with others shall be allowed only where the consoli- 
dated company shall become a domestic corporation of this State. No 
general or special law shall ever be passed for^the benefit of any foreign 



1236 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

corporation operating a railroad under an existing license from this State, 
or under an existing lease; and no grant of any right or privilege, and no 
exemption from any burden, shall be made to any such foreign corpora- 
tion except upon the condition that the owners or stockholders thereof 
shall first organize a corporation in this State under the laws thereof; and 
shall thereafter operate and manage the same, and the business thereof, 
under said domestic charter. 

Sec. 198. The Legislature shall enact laws to prevent all trusts, 
combinations, contracts, and agreements inimical to the public welfare. 
A public contract for an article for less than cost is not within 
this section. Johnson Pub. Co. v. Mills, 79 Miss., 543 (31 So., 

lOl). 

Under this section only such trusts, combinations, contracts 
and agreements were to -be prevented by the Legislature as 
would be "inimical to the public welfare." Railroad v. Searles, 
f ^ 85 Miss., 529 (37 So., 939). 

I. Sec. 199. The term "corporation" used in this article shall include all 

f , associations and all joint-stock companies for pecuniary gain having 
{ privileges not possessed by individuals or partnerships. 

I Sec. 200. The Legislature shall enforce the provisions of this article 

I by appropriate legislation. 

r 

'f ARTICLE VIII. 

i 

I , EDUCATION. 

Sec. 201. It shall be the duty of the Legislature to encourage, by all 
suitable means, the promotion of intellectual, scientific, moral, and agri- 
> cultural improvement, by establishing a uniform system of free pubHc 

\ schools, by taxation or otherwise, for all children between the ages of five 

\ and twenty-one years, and, as soon as practicable, to establish schools of 
f higher grade. 

ir (1817, Art. VI, Sec. 16; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 14; 1869, Art. 

{ VIII, Sec. I.) 

1 _ The school fund can only be applied to such schools as are with- 

L in the uniform system devised. Otken v. Lamkin, 56 Miss., 75S. 

I It is not required that the manner of selecting county super- 

I intendents shall be uniform. Wynn v. State, 67 -Miss., 312 

r • (7 So., 353). 

The Legislature may not authorize a diversion of the common 

school fund, but may (decided under Sec. i, Art. VIII, Consti- 
j, tution 1869) empower local authorities to provide schools out- 

' side the established system and pay therefor by taxation. 

Otken V. Lamkin, 56 Miss., 75S, distinguished; Chrisinan v, 
:. Brookhaven, 70 Miss., 477 (12 So., 45S). 

;; The Constitution of 1869, ^^- VIII, Sec. i, and also § 201 of 

the Constitution of 1890, providing for the establishment of a 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1237 

uniform system of public schools, prohibited the appointment 
by legislative act of designated persons as trustees of a public 
school for a term of twenty years, the act granting the trustees 
power to fill vacancies, exclusive control and various other 
powers not conferred on trustees of public schools generally. 
Ellis v. Greaves, 82 Miss., 36 (34 So., 81). 

While § 4008 of the Code of 1892 did not supersede § 148 of the 
Laws of 1888 relative to the -trustees of the Hazlehurst public 
school, nevertheless said act of 1888 is unconstitutional in that 
it violates § 201 of the Constitution of 1890. lb. 

' Sec. 202. There shall be a Superintendent of Public Education elected 
at the same time and in the same manner as the Governor, who shall have 
the qualifications required of the Secretary of State, and hold his office 
for four years, and until his successor shall be elected and qualiiied, who 
shall have the general supervision of the common schools and of the 
educational interests of the State, and who shall perform such other 
_ duties and receive such compensation as shall be prescribed by law. 
(1869, Art. VIII, Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 203. There shall be a Board of Education, consisting of the 
Secretary of State, the Attorney-General, and the Superintendent of 
Public Education, for the management and investment of the school- 
funds according to law, and for the performance of such other duties as 
.may be prescribed. The Superintendent and one other of said Board 
shall constitute a quorum. 

(1869, Art. VIII, Sec. 3.) 

Sec. 204. There shall be a Superintendent of Public Education in each 
county, who shall be appointed by the Board of Education by and with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, whose term of office shall be four 
years, and whose qualifications, compensation, and duties, shall be 
prescribed by law; Provided, That the Legislature shall have power to 
make the office of County School Superintendent of the several counties" 
elective, or may otherwise provide for the discharge of the duties of 
County Superintendent, or abolish said office. 

(1869, Art. VIII, Sec. 4). 

The term of office cannot be extended by the Legislature. 
Burnham v. Summer, 50 Miss., 517. 

Sec. 205. A public school shall be maintained in each school-district 
in the county at least four months during each schola.-^tic year. A schu* •!- 
district neglecting to maintain its school four months, shall be entitled 
to only such part of the free school fund as may be required to pay the 
teacher for the time actually taught. 
(1869, Art. VIII, Sec. 5.) 

Sec. 206. There shall be a county common school fund, wliich shall 
consist of the poll-tax, to be retained in the counties where the same is 
collected, and a State common school fund, to be taken from the general 



1238 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

fund in the State treasury, which together shall be sufficient to maintain 
the common schools for the term of four months in each scholastic year. 
But any county or separate school district may levy an additional tax to 
maintain its schools for a longer time than the term of four months. The 
State common school fund shall be distributed among the several counties 
and separate school districts in proportion to the number of educable 
children in each, to be determined from data collected through the office 
of the State Superintendent of Education in the manner to be prescribed 
by law. (Laws 1904, ch. 173). 

(1869, Art.- VIII, Sec. 6.) (See amendment No. 2). 
The section abrogated Sec. 6, Art. VIII, Constitution of 1869, 
by which fines were devoted to the common school fund. State 
Board of Education v. Mobile, etc., R. R. Co., 71 Miss., 500 
(14 So., 445). 

\- Sec. 207, Separate schools shall be maintained for children of the 

f white and colored races. 

i Sec. 208. No religious or other sect or sects shall ever control any 

[ part of the school or other educational funds of this State; nor shall any 

i funds be appropriated towards the support of any sectarian school, or to 

t' any school that at the time of receiving such appropriation is not con- 

r ducted as a free school. ' 

J (1869, Art. VIII, Sec. 9.) 

[• Sec. 209. It shall be the duty of the Legislature to provide by law for 

!' the support of institutions for the education of the deaf, dumb, and blind. 
I (1869, Art. XII, Sec. 27.) 

\ Sec. 210. No public officer of this State, or any district, county, city, 

■ or town thereof, nor any teacher or trustee of any public school, shall be 
■; interested in the sale, proceeds, or profits of any books, apparatus, or 
\ furniture to be used in any public school in this State. Penalties shall 
jl be provided by law for the violation of this section. 

U Sec. 211. The Legislature shall enact such laws as may be necessary 

I to ascertain the true condition of the title to the sixteenth section lands 

[ in this State, or land granted in lieu thereof, in the Choctaw purcha.se, 

( and shall provide that the sixteenth section lands reserved for the support 

[ of township schools shall not be sold, nor shall they be leased for a longer 

[ term than ten years for a gross sum; but the Legislature may provide for 

I the lease of any of said lands for a term not exceeding twenty-five years 

t for a ground rental, payable annually; and, in case of uncleared lands, 

> may lease them for such short term as may be deemed proper in consid- 

■ eration of the improvement thereof, with right thereafter to lea.se for a 
term or to hold on payment of ground rent. 

(181 7, Art. VI, Sec. 20.) 

Sec. 212. The rate of interest on the fund known as the "Chickasaw 

School Fund," and other trust funds for educational purposes for which 

•. the State is responsible, shall be fixed, and remain as long as said funds 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 1239 

are held by the State, at six per centum per annum from and after the 
close of the fiscal year A. D. 1891; and the distribution of said interest 
shall be made semi-annually, on the first of May and November of each 
year. 

This section is not self -executing ; there must be a legislative 

appropriation. State ex rel v. Cole, Auditor, 81 Miss., 174 

(32 So.. 314). 

Sec. 213. The State having received and appropriated the land 
donated to it for the support of agricultural and mechanical colleges by 
the United States, and having, in furtherance of the beneficent design of 
Congress in granting said land, established the Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College of Mississippi and the Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical 
College, it is the duty of th© State to sacredly carry out the conditions of 
the Act of Congress upon the subject, approved July 2, A. D. 1862, and 
the Legislature shall preserve intact the endowments to and support said 
colleges. 

ARTICLE IX. 

MILITIA. 

Sec. 214. All able-bodied male citizens of the State between the ages 
of eighteen and forty-five years shall be liable to military duty in the 
militia of this State, in such manner as the Legislature may provide. 
(1869, Art.'lX, Sec. i.) 

Sec. 215. The Legislature shall provide for the organizing, arming, 
equipping, and discipline of the militia, and for paying the same when 
called into active service. 

(1S17, Art. "Militia," Sec. i; 1832, lb.; 1869, Art. IX, Sec. 2.) 

Sec. 216. All officers of militia, except non-commissioned ofl[icers, 
shall be appointed by the Governor, by and with consent of the Senate, 
or €lected, as the Legislature may determine; and no commissioned 
officer shall be removed from office except by the Senate on suggestion 
of the Governor, stating the ground on which such removal is recom- 
mended, or by the decision of a court-marshal pursuant to law, or at his 
own request. 

(181 7, Art. "Militia," Sec. 3; 1832, lb.; 1S69, Art. IX, Sec. 4.) 

Sec. 217. The Governor shall be Commander-in-Chief of the militia, 
except when it is called into "the service of the United States, and shall 
have power to call forth the militia to execute the laws, repel invasion, 
and to suppress riots and insurrections. 

(1S17, Art. "Mihtia," Sec. 4; 1832, lb.; 1S69, Art. IX, Sec. 5.) 

Sec. 218. The Governor shall nominate, and, by and with the consent 
of the Senate, commission one Major-Gen'eral for the State, who sh.ill bo 
a citizen thereof, and also one Brigadier-General tor each Congressional 
District, who shall be a resident of the district for which he shall be 
appointed, J^and each district shall constitute a militia division. 
(1869, Art. IX, Sec. 6.) 



1240 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Sec. 219. The Adjutant-General, and other staff officers to the Com- 
mander-in-Chief, shall be appointed by the Governor, and their appoint- 
ment shall expire with the Governor's term of office, and the Legislature 
shall provide by law a salary for the Adjutant-General commensurate 
with the duties of said office. 

(1869, Art. IX, Sec. 7.) - ' ' 

Sec. 220. The militia shall be exempt from arrest during their attend- 
ance on musters, and in going to and returning from the same, except in 
case of treason, felony, or breach of the peace. 
(1869, Art. IX, Sec. 8.) 

Sec 221. The Legislature is hereby required to make an annual 
appropriation for the efficient support and maintenance of the Mississippi 
National Guard, which shall consist of not less than one hundred men for 
each Senator and Representative to which this State may be entitled in 
the Congress of the United States; but no part of such funds shall be 
used in the payment of said guard except when in actual service. 

Sec. 222. The Legislature shall empower the board of supervisors of 
each county in the State to aid in supporting a mihtary company or 
companies of the Mississippi National Guard within its borders, under 
such regulations, limitations, and restrictions as may be prescribed by 
law. 

ARTICLE X. 

THE PENITENTIARY AND PRISONS. 

Sec 223. No penitentiary convict shall ever be leased or hired to 
any person or persons, or corporation, private or public or quasi public, 
or board, after December the thirty-first, A. D. 1894, save as authorized 
in the next section, nor shall any previous lease or hiring of convicts 
extend beyond that date; and the Legislature shall abandon the system 
of such leasing or hiring as much sooner than the date mentioned as may 
be consistent with the economic safety of the State. 

Sec 224. The Legislature may authorize the employment under 
State supervision and the proper officers and employes of the State, of 
convicts on public roads or other pubUc works, or by any levee board on 
any public levees, under such provisions and restrictions as it may from 
time to time see proper to impose; but said convicts shall not be let or 
hired to any contractors under said board, nor shall the working of the 
convicts on public roads, or public works, or by any levee board ever 
interfere with the preparation for or the cultivation of any crop which it 
may be intended shall be cultivated by the said convicts, nor interfere 
with the good management of the State farm, nor put the State to any 
expense. 

Sec 225. The Legislature may place the convicts on a State farm or 
farms and have them worked thereon under State supervision exclusively, 
in tilling the soil or manufacturing, or both, and may buy farms for that 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1241 

purpose. It may establish a reformatory school or schools, and provide 
for keeping of juvenile offenders from association with hardened criminals. 
It may provide for the commutation of the sentence of convicts for good 
behavior, and for the constant separation of the sexes, and for the sepa- 
ration of the white and black convicts as far as practicable, and for 
religious worship for the convicts. 
(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 28.) 

Sec. 226. Convicts sentenced to the county jail shall not be hired or 
leased to any person or corporation outside of the county of their con- 
viction after the first day of January, A. D. 1893, nor for a term that shall 
extend beyond that date. 

ARTICLE XI. 

LEVEES. 

Sec. 227. A levee system shall be maintained in the State as provided 
in this article. 

Sec. 228. The division heretofore made by the Legislature of the 
alluvial land of the State into two levee districts — viz., the Yazoo-Mis- 
sissippi Delta Levee District and the Mississippi Levee District, as shown 
by the laws creating the same, and the amendments thereto — is hereby 
recognized, and said districts shall so remain until changed by law; but 
the Legislature may hereafter add to either of said districts any other 
alluvial land in the State. 

Lands within the Mississippi Levee District, as recognized by 
the section, and not between the levee and the river (exempted 
by Sec. 238) are liable to levee taxes, although they be damaged 
rather than benefited by the construction of the levees. Smith 
V. Willis, 78 Miss., 243 (28 So., 878). 

Sec. 229. There shall be a board of levee commissioners for the 
Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee District which shall consist of two members 
from each of the counties of Coahoma and Tunica, and one member from 
each of the remaining counties or parts of counties now or hereafter 
embraced within the limits of said district, and the Governor may appoint 
a stockholder in the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Railway Company 
as an additional commissioner; and there shall also be a Board of Levee 
Commissioners for the Mississippi Levee District, which shall consist of 
two members from each of the counties of BoUvar and Washington, and 
one from each of the counties of Issaquena and Sharkey. In the event 
of the formation of a new county or counties out of the territory embraced 
in either or both of said levee districts, such new counties shall each be 
entitled to representation and membership in the proper board or boards. 

Sec. 230. All of said commissioners shall be qualified electors of the 
respective counties or parts of counties from which they may be chosen, 
except the one selected for the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Rail- 
way Company; and the Legislature shall provide that they shall each 
give bond for the faithful performance of his duties, and shall fix the 



1242 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

penalty thereof; but the penalty of such bond in no instance shall be fixed 
at less than ten thousand dollars, and the sureties thereon shall be free- 
holders of the district. 

Sec. 231. When the terms of the present levee commissioners shall 
expire, or whenever a vacancy shall occur or be about to occur in either 
of said boards, the Governor shall make appointments to fill vacancies, 
subject to the confirmation of the Senate. The terms of office of said 
commissioners shall remain as provided by law at the adoption of this 
Constitution; but this provision shall not require the appointment of a 
I commissioner for the Louisville, New Orleans and Texas Railway Com- 
[ pany, except in the discretion of the Governor as provided. 

[ . Sec. 232. The commissioners of said levee districts shall have super- 

[. vision of the erection, repair, and maintenance of the levees in their 

: respective districts, and shall have power to cede all their rights of way 

I and levees and the maintenance, management and control thereof to 

\ the government of the United States. (Laws 1900, ch. 2dc). 

|_ Sec, 233. The levee boards shall have, and are hereby granted. 

; authority and full power to appropriate private property in their respec- 
I tive districts for the purpose of constructing, maintaining, and repairing 
• levees therein; and when any owner of land, or any other person inter- 
[ ested therein, shall object to the location or building of the levee thereon, 
: or shall claim compensation for any land that may be taken, or for any 
t. damages he may sustain in consequence thereof, the president, or other 
; proper officer or agent of such levee board, or owner of such land, or 
other person interested therein, may forthwith apply for an assessment 
■ of the damages to which said person claiming the same may be entitled; 
whereupon the proceedings as now provided by law shall be taken, viz. : 
In the Mississippi Levee District, in accordance with the terms and pro- 
visions of Section 3 of an act entitled "An act to amend an act to incorporate 
r the Board of Levee Commissioners for Bolivar, Washington, and Issa- 
I ' quena Counties, and for other purposes, approved November 27, A. D. 
I 1865, and to revise acts amendatory thereof," approved March 13, A. D. 
I 1884; and in the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee District, in accordance 
; with the terms and provisions of Section 3 of an act entitled "An act 
to incorporate the board of levee commissioners for the Yazoo-Mis- 
sissippi Delta, and for other purposes," approved February 28, A. D. 
; 1884, and the amendments- thereto; but the Legislature shall have full 
power to alter and amend said several acts, and to provide different 
; manners of procedure. 

•; A person whose land is damaged by the taking of the land of 

' another is entitled to compensation and may maintain proceed- 

ings, as if his land had been taken, therefor. Richardson v. 
Levee Commissioners, 77 Miss., 51S (26 So., 963). 

Sec. 234. No bill changing the boundaries of the district, or affecting 
the taxation or revenue of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee District, or 
the Mississippi Levee District, shall be considered by the Legislature 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1243 

unless said bill shall have been published in some newspaper in the county 
in which is situated the domicile of the board of levee commissioners of 
the levee district to be affected thereby, for four weeks prior to the intro- 
duction thereof into the Legislature; and no such bill shall be considered 
for final passage by either the Senate or House of Representatives, unless 
the same shall have been referred to, and reported on, by an appropriate 
comsiittee of each house in which the same may be pending; and no such 
committee shall consider or report on any such bill unless publication 
thereof shall have been made as aforesaid. 

Sec. 235. Each levee board shall make, at the end of each fiscal year, 
to the Governor of this State, a report showing the condition of the 
levees and recommending such additional legislation on the subject of the 
system as shall be thought necessary, and. showing the receipts and 
expenditures of the board, so that each item, the amotmt and considera- 
tion therefor, shall distinctly appear, together with such other matters 
as it shall be thought proper to call to the attention of the Legislature. 

Sec. 236. The Legislature shall impose for levee purposes, in addition 
to the levee taxes heretofore levied or authorized by law, a uniform tax 
of not less than two nor more than five cents an acre per annum upon 
every acre of land now^ or hereafter embraced within the limits of either 
or both of said levee districts. The taxes so derived shall be paid into 
the treasury of the levee board of the district in w^hich the land charged 
with the same is situated; and the Legislature, by the act imposing said 
tax, shall authorize said levee boards to fix the annual rate of taxation 
per acre within the limits aforesaid, and thereby require said levee boards, 
whenever a reduction is made by them in their other taxes, to make a 
proportionate reduction in the acreage tax hereinbefore mentioned; but 
said acreage tax shall not be reduced below two cents an acre per annum ; 
and all reductions in such taxation shall be uniform in each of said dis- 
tricts ; but the rate of taxation need not be the same in both of them; and 
such specific taxes shall be assessed on the same assessment roll, and 
collected under the same penalties, as the ad valorem taxes for levee 
purposes, and shall be paid at the same time wdth the latter. And no 
levee board shall ever be permitted to buy lands when sold for taxes; 
but the State shall have a prior lien for the taxes due thereto. The 
Legislature may provide for the discontinuance of the tax on cotton, but 
not in such manner as to affect outstanding bonds based on it; and, on 
the discontinuance of the tax on cotton, shall impose another tax in lieu 
thereof; but the Legislature may repeal the acreage tax required to be 
levied hereby after the first day of January, A. D. 1895. 

Sec. 237. The Legislature shall have full power to provide such system 
of taxation for said levee districts as it shall, from time to time, deem 
wise and proper. 

Sec. 23S. No propt.^rty situated between the levee and the Mississippi 
River shall be taxed for levee purposes, nor shall damage be paid to any 
owner of land so situated because of its being left outside a levee. 



1244 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

On a condemnation of land for levee purposes, the owner is not 
entitled, under the section, to damage because a part of his land 
is left outside of the levee ; but is entitled to damage caused by the 
levee itself, such as the obstruction of drainage on land so situate. 
Duncan v. Board, etc., 74 Miss., 125 (20 So., 838). 

Lands within the Mississippi Levee District, as recognized 
by Constitution of 1890, Sec. 228 (and not between the levee 
and the river, exempted by Constitution of 1890, Sec. 238), are 
liable to levee taxes, although they be damaged rather than 
benefited by the construction of the levees. The doctrine of 
-comparative benefits and graduation of servitudes will not be 
recognized by the courts in respect to levee taxes. Carlisle v. 
Gunn, 68 Miss., 243 {8 So., 743). 

The word "property" herein does not cover any species of 
intangible property. It refers to real estate, or property having 
the fixed location of real estate. Levee Commissioners v. 
Houston, 81 Miss., 619 (33 So., 491). 

Hence it does not apply to license to a dramshop keeper 
doing business between the levee and the river. lb. 

Sec. 239." The Legislature shall require the levee boards to publish at 
each of their sessions an itemized account embracing their respective 
receipts since the prior session, and such appropriations as have been 
made or ordered by them respectively, in some newspaper or newspapers 
of the district. 

ARTICLE XII. 

FRANCHISE. 

Sec. 240. All elections by the people shall be by ballot. 
(1869, Art. VII, Sec. I.) 

Sec. 241. Every male inhabitant of this State, except idiots, insane 
persons, and Indians not taxed, w^ho is a citizen of the United States, 
twenty-one years old and upwards, who has resided in this State two 
years, and one year in the election district, or in the incorporated city or 
town in which he offers to vote, and who is duly registered as provided 
in this article, and who has never been convicted of bribery, burglary, 
theft, arson, obtaining money or goods under false pretences, perjury, 
forgery, embezzlement, or biganiy, and w^ho has paid, on or before the 
first day of February of the year in which he shall offer to vote, all taxes 
which may have been legally required of him, and which he has had an 
opportunity of paying according to law, for the two preceding years, and 
who shall produce to the officers holding the election satisfactory evidence 
that he has paid said taxes, is declared to be a qualified elector; but any 
minister of the gOi^pel in charge of an organized church shall be entitled 
to vote after six month's residence in the election district, if otherwise 
qualified. 

(1869, Art. VII, Sec. 2; and Art. XII, Sec. 2.) 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSII'I'I. 124.J 

See Jones v. Registrars of Alcorn County, 56 Miss., 766. 

The section does not violate the Constitution of the United 
States. Sproule v. Fredericks, 69 Miss., 898 (11 So., 472); 
Williams v. Mississippi, 170 U. S., 213. 

The section was suspended by Section 276, so far as concerns 
the payment of a poll tax as a qualification for a juror (Sec. 
. 264) ; and was further suspended of necessity so far as registra- 
tion was concerned as such qualification until the Legislature 
provided therefor. Nail v. State, 70 Miss., 32 (11 So., 793). 

Payment of taxes is not a condition of registration. Bew v. 
State, 71 Miss., i (13 So., 868). 

In determining who may vote at a. local option election (Code 
1892, § 1610; Code 1906, Sec. 1777), the board of supervisors 
should reject from the petition the names of persons who are not 
registered, and who, if registered, have not the other qualifica- 
tions prescribed by the section. The registration books merely 
show the possible qualified voters. Ferguson v. Monroe County, 
71 Miss., 524 (14 So., 81). 

The section is not obnoxious to the fourteenth amendment 
to the United States Constitution because of discrimination on 
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Dixon 
V. State, 74 Miss., 271 (20 So., 839). 

One who had not, at the time of election, paid taxes as required 
by the section is not (Sec. 245, 250) eligible to office, and a mis- 
taken belief, however honestly entertained, that he has paid in 
due time "all taxes legally required of him," will not reheve the 
delinquent. Roane v. Tunstall, 75 Miss., 04 (21 So., 665). 

Since qualified voters alone are qualified petitioners, the 
section requires that the taxes of petitioners for license to retail 
intoxicating liquors must have been paid for two years preceding 
the year in which they sign. Ferguson v. Brown, 75 Miss., 
ai4 (21 So., 603). 

This section forbids the Legislature to add to the qualifications 
of a municipal voter, residence for one year in the municipality 
before registering. State e:t rel v. Kelly, Si ML^s., i (32 So., 909). 

This section and Sec. 242 have no application to elections 
under stock laws. Leflore Co, v. State, 7c Miss., 770 (12 So., 
904). 

The Legislature has plenary power over the subject. lb. 

Sec. 242. The Legislature shall provide by law for the rc.c:i^tration 
of all persons entitled to vote at any election, and all person.s oiTering to 

register shall take the following oath or affirmation: "I, — . do 

solemnly swear [or affirm] that I am twenty-one years old [or I 'A"ill be 
before the next election in this county], and that Iwill have resided in 

this State two years and election district of county 

one year next preceding the ensuing election [or if it be stated in the 
oath that the person proposing to register is a minister of the gos|.)el in 



1246 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

charge of an organized church, ther^ it will be sufficient to aver therein 
two years residence in the State and six months in said election dis- 
trict], and am now in good faith a resident of the same, and that I am 
not disqualified from voting by reason of having been convicted of any 
crime named in tne Constitution of this State as a disquaUfication to be 
an elector; that I will truly answer all questions propounded to me con- 
cerning my antecedents, so far as they relate to my right to vote, and also 
as to my residence before my citizenship in this district ; that I will faith- 
fully support the Constitution of the United States and of the State of 
Mississippi, and will bear true faith and allegiance to the same. So help 
me God." In registering voters in cities and towns not wholly in one 
election district, the name of such city or town may be substituted in 
I the oath for the election district. Any willful and corrupt false state- 

r ment in said affidavit, or in answer to any material question propounded 

(- as herein authorized, shall be perjury. 

f; (1869, -Art. VII, Sec. 3.) 

\r The section does not violate the Constitution of the United 

t; States. Sproule v. Frederick, 69 Miss., 398 (11 So., 472); 

\ Williams v. Mississippi, 170 U. S., 213. 

* The section is not obnoxious to the fourteenth amendment to 

t - the United States Constitution, because of discrimination on 

I" account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Dixon 

|- V. State, 74 Miss., 271 (20 So., 839). 

Payment of taxes is not a condition of registration. Bew v. 
State, 71 Miss., i (13 So., 868). 

This section contains the same inhibition as Section 241 . forbid- 
ding the Legislature to add to the qualifications of a municipal 
"voter residence in the municipality for one year before register- 
1^ ing. State ex rel v. Kelly, 81 Miss., i (32 So., 909). 

f Both Sections 241 and 242 apply to municipal as well as State 

I - and county elections. lb. 

I This section and Sec. 241 have no application to election 

I under stock laws. Leflore v. State, 70 Miss., 770 (12 So., 904). 

i • The Legislature has plenary power over the subject. lb. 

\ Sec. 243. A uniform poll tax of two dollars, to be used "in aid of 

*,. the common schools, and for no other purpose, is hereby imposed on 

\ every male inhabitant of this State between the ages of twenty-one and 

I sixty years, except persons who are deaf and dumb or blind, or who are 

t' maimed by loss of hand or foot; said tax to be a lien only upon taxable 

• property. The board of siipervi.^ors of any county may, for the purpose 

■ of aiding the common schools in that county, increase the poll tax in 

! . said county, but in no case shall the entire poll tax exceed in any one 

year three dollars on each poll. No criminal proceedings shall be allowed 

to enforce the collection of the poll tax. 

The section does not violate the Constitution of tlie United 
States. Sproule v. Frederick, 69 Miss., 398 (11 So., 472); 
[ Williams v. Mississippi, 170 U. S., 213. 



i^ 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1247 

Property which is exempt from taxation cannot, under the 
section, be distrained to coerce the payment of a poll tax. 
Ratliff V. Beal, 74 Miss., 247 (20 So.. 865). 

Debts due to laborers for wages, not being exempt from 
taxation, are subject to sale for delinquent poll taxes. White 
V. Martin, 75 Miss., 646 (23 So., 289). 

Sec. 244. On and after the first day of January, A. D. 1892, every 
elector shall, in addition to the foregoing qualifications, be able to read . 
any section of the Constitution of the State; or he shall be able to under- 
stand the same when read to him, or give a reasonable interpretation 
thereof. A new registration shall be made before the next ensuing 
election after January- the first, A. D. 1892. 

The section does not violate the Constitution of the United 
States. Sproule v. Frederick, 69 Miss., 398 (11 So., 472); 
"Williams v. Mississippi, 170 U. S., 213. 

The section is not obnoxious to the fourteenth amendment to 
the United States Constitution becau.se of discrimination on 
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Dixon 
V. State, 74 Miss., 271 (20 So., 839). 

Under the section, construed with Sec. 264, a juror must be 
able to read any section of the Constitution. Mabry v. State, 
71 Miss., 716 (14 So., 267).^ 

Sec. 245. Electors in municipal elections shall possess all the quali- 
fications herein prescribed, and such" additional qualifications as may 
be provided by law. 

The section makes th^ provisions of Sec. 241 applicable to 

municipal electors. Roane v. Tunstall, 75 Miss., 94 (21 So., 665). 

This section authorizes the Legislature to provide that voters 

in a municipal election should vote in the wards of their residence. 

State ex rel v. Kelly, 81 Miss., i (32 So., 909). 

Sec. 246. Prior to the first day of January, A. D. 1896, the elections 
by the people in this State shall be regulated by an ordinance of this 
convention. 

Sec. 247. The Legislature shall enact laws to secure fairness in party 
primary elections, conventions, or other methods of naming party can- 
didates. 

This section authorizes nomination of public oflficers by 
primary election exclusively. Mclnnis v. Thames, 80 Miss., 
617 (32 So., 286). 

Sec. 248. Suitable remedies by appeal or otherwise shall be pro\'ided 
by law, to correct illegal or improper registration and to secure tlie 
elective franchise to those who may be illegally or improperly denied 
the same. 

Sec. 249. No one shall be allowed to vote for members of the Legis- 
lature or other officers who has not been duly registered under the Con- 



1248 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

stitution and laws of this State, by an officer of this State, legally author- 
ized to register the voters thereof. And registration under the Consti- 
: tution and laws of this State by the proper officers of this State is hereby 
declared to be an essential and necessary qualification to vote at any 
and all elections. 

Payment of taxes is not a condition of registration. Bew v. 
State, 71 Miss., i (13 So., 868). 

An elector must be registered. lb. 

Sec. 250. All qualified electors and no others, shall be eligible to 
office, except as otherwise provided in this Constitution. 

A person who is not a qualified elector at the time of his 
election cannot maintain a quo warranto to obtain possession of 
an office. Andrews v. Covington, 69 Miss., 740 (13 So., 853). 
A person who fails to register is not eligible to office. lb. 
A person is not eligible to a municipal office (Sees. 245, 241) 
who is not a quahfied (State and county) elector. Roane v. 
Tunstall, 75 Miss., 94 (21 So., 665). 

Sec. 251. Electors shall not be registered within four months next 
[before any election at which they may offer to vote; but appeals may be 
[heard and determined and revision take place at any time prior to the 
Selection; and no person who, in respect to age and residence, would 
Ibecome entitled to vote within the said four months, shall be excluded 
J from registration on account of his want of quaHfication at the time of 
[registration. 

i , The section has reference to elections contemplated by the 

r Constitution and does not apply to local option elections under 

[ (Code 1892, § i6ic; Code 1906, Sec. 1777) the statute. Bew v. 

1 State, 71 Miss., i (13 So., 868). 

i . An elector may register at any time, but cannot vote until he 

\ . has been registered four months. lb. 

t This section applies to all elections. One who will have resided 

I in a municipality one year before the election is entitled to 
I register and vote, if he appHes to register four months before the 
[ election. State ex rel v. Kelly, 81 Miss., i (32 So., 909). 
\' 

\ Sec. 252. The term of office of all elective officers under this Constitu- 
ition shall be four years, except as otherwise provided herein. A general 
lelection for all elective officers shall be held on the Tuesday next after 
Ithe first Monday of November, A. D. 1895, and every four years there- 
jafter; Provided, The Legislature may change the day and date of general 
[elections to any day and date in October, November or December. 
* The terms of elective officers are fixed, com.mencing and 

ending after general elections. Smith v. Halfacre, 6 How. 

(Miss.), 582; Thornton v. Boyd, 25 Miss., 59S. 
;, The section relates only to State and county officers. State 

v. Williams, 49 Miss., 640. 






FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. * 1249 

Sec. 253. The Legislature may, by a two-thirds vote of both houses, 
of all members elected, restore the right of suffrage to any person dis- 
qualified by reason of crime ; but the reasons therefor shall be spread 
upon the journals, and the vote shall be by yeas and nays. 

• ARTICLE XIIL 

APPORTIONMENT. 

Sec. 254. The number of Representatives in the Lower House of the 
Legislature shall be one hundred and thirty-three, to be apportioned as 
follows : 

First. — The counties of Choctaw-, Covington, Greene, Hancock, 
Issaquena, Jones, Lawrence, Leflore, Marion, Neshoba, Pearl River, 
Perry, Quitman, Scott, Sharkey, Simpson, Smith, Sunflower, Tallahatchie, 
Tishomingo, Tunica, Wayne, and Webster each shall have one Repre- 
sentative. 

Second. — The counties of Alcom, Amite, Attala, Bolivar, Calhoun, 
Carroll, Chickasaw, Clay, Coahoma, DeSoto, Kemper, Lafayette, Madison. 
Newton, Pike, Pontotoc, Prentiss, Rankin, Tate, Union, Wilkinson, and 
Yalobusha each shall have two representatives. 

Third. — The counties of Copiah, Holmes, Marshall, Monroe, Noxubee, 
^ Panola, Warren, and Washington each shall have three Representatives. 

r Fourth. — The counties of Franklin and Lincoln each shall have one 

\\ Representative and a floater between them. 

1' Fifth. — The counties of Tippah and Benton each shall have one Repre- 

fc ' . sentative and a floater between them. 

J Sixth. — ^The counties of Claiborne and Jefferson each shall have one 

fiJ Representative and a floater between them. 

y. Seventh. — The counties of Clarke and Jasper each shall have one 

Representative and a floater between them. 

Eighth. — The counties of Grenada and Montgomery each shall have 
one Representative and a floater between them. 

Ninth. — The counties of Leake and Winston each shall have one 
Representative and a floater betw^een them. 

Tenth. — The counties of Harrison and Jackson each shall have one 
Representative and a floater between them. 

Eleventh. — The county of Yazoo shall have three Representatives, 
and the county of Hinds shall have three Representatives, and they 
shall have a floater between them. 

Twelfth. — The county of Lauderdale shall have three Representatives, 
one to be elected by the city of Meridian, one by the county outside the 
city limits, and one by the whole county including Meridian, 

Thirteenth. — The county of Adams, outside the city of Natchez, shall 
have one Representative, and the city of Natchez one Representative. 
Fourteenth. — The county of Lowndes shall have three Representa- 
tives, two of whom shall be elected by that part of the county east of 
the Tombigbee River, and one b)' that portion west of said river. 
40 



X250 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Fifteenth. — The county of Oktibbeha shall have two Representatives, 
one of whom shall be elected by that portion of the county east of the 
line running north and south between ranges thirteen and fourteen, and 
the other by that portion of the county west of said line. 

Sixteenth. — The county of Lee shall have two Representatives, the 
county of Itawamba one, and a floater between them. 

Seventeenth. — In counties divided into legislative districts, any citizen 
of the county eligible for election to the House of Representatives shall 
be eligible to represent any district thereof. 

THE SENATE. 

Sec. 255. The number of Senators shall be forty-five, and are appor- 
tioned as follows: 

First. — The counties of Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson shall con- 
stitute the first district, and elect one senator. 

Second. — The counties of Wayne, Jones, Perry, and Greene the second 
district, and elect one Senator. 

Third. — The counties of Jasper and Clarke the third district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Fourth. — The counties of Simpson, Covington, Marion, and Pearl 
River the fourth district, and elect one Senator. 

Fifth. — The counties of Rankin and Smith the fifth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Sixth. — The counties of Pike and Franklin the sixth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Seventh. — The counties of Amite and Wilkinson the seventh district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Eighth. — The counties of Lincoln and Lawrence the eighth district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Ninth. — The county of Adams the ninth district, and elect one Senator. 

Tenth. — The counties of Claiborne and Jefferson the tenth district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Eleventh. — The county of Copiah the eleventh district, and elect one 
Senator. 

Twelfth. — The counties of Hinds and Warren the twelfth district, and 
elect one Senator each and a Senator between them, to be chosen from 
the cotmties alternately, beginning with Hinds. 

Thirteenth. — The counties of Scott and Newton the thirteenth district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Fourteenth. — -The county of Lauderdale the fourteenth district, and 
elect one Senator. 

Fifteenth. — The counties of Kemper and Winston the fifteenth district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Sixteenth. — The county of Noxubee the sixteenth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Seventeenth. — The counties of Leake and Neshoba the seventeenth 
district, and elect one Senator. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1251 

Eighteenth. — The county of Madison the eighteenth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Nineteenth. — The county of Yazoo the nineteenth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Twentieth. — The counties of Sharkey and Issaquena the twentieth 
district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty- fir St. — The county of Holmes the twenty-first district, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenty-second. — The county of Attala the twenty-second district, and 
-elect one Senator. 

Twenty-third. — The counties of Oktibbeha and Choctaw the twenty- 
third district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fourth. — The counties of Clay and Webster the twenty-fourth 
district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-fifth. — The county of Lowndes the twenty-fifth district, and 
elect one Senator. 

Twenty-sixth. — The counties of Carroll and Montgomery the twenty- 
sixth district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty- seventh. — The counties of Leflore and Tallahatchie the twenty- 
seventh district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-eighth. — The counties of Yalobusha and Grenada the twenty- 
eighth district, and elect one Senator. 

Twenty-ninth. — The counties of Washington and Sunflower the 
twenty-ninth district. The county of Washington shall elect one Senator, 
and the counties of Washington and Sunflower a Senator between them. 

Thirtieth. — The county of Bolivar the thirtieth district, and elect one 
Senator. 

Thirty-first. — The counties of Chickasaw, Calhoun, and Pontotoc the 
thirty-first district, and elect two Senators. Both Senators shall at no 
time be chosen from the same county. 

Thirty-second. — The county of Lafayette the thirty-second district, 
and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-third. — The county of Panola the thirty-third district, and 
elect one Senator. 

Thirty-fourth. — The counties of Coahoma, Tunica and Quitman the 
thirty-fourth district, and elect one Senator. 

Thirty-fifth. — The county of DeSoto the thiity-fifth district, and elect 
one Senator. 

Thirty-sixth. — The counties of Union. Tippah, Benton, Marshall, and 
Tate the thirty-sixth district, and elect three Senators. The counties of 
Tate and Benton shall be entitled to one, the counties of Union and 
Tippah one, and the county of Marshall one. 

Thirty- seventh. — The counties of Tishomingo, Alcorn, and Prentiss the 
thirty-seventh district, and elect 'one'Senator. 

Thirty-eighth. — The counties "of ^"Monroe, Lee, and Itawamba the 
thirty-eighth district, and elect two Senators, one of whom shall be a 



1252 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

resident of the county of Monroe and the other a resident of Lee or 
Itawamba Counties. 

Sec. 256. The Legislature may, at the first session after the federal 
census of 1900, and decennially thereafter, make a new apportionment of 
Senators and Representatives. At each apportionment each county then 
^organized shall have at least one Representative. The counties of Tisho- 
mingo, Alcorn, Prentiss, Lee, Itawamba, Tippah, Union, Benton, 
Marshall, Lafayette, Pontotoc, Monroe, Chickasaw, Calhoun, Yalobusha, 
Grenada, Carroll, Montgomery, Choctaw, Webster, Clay, Lowndes and 
Oktibbeha, or the territory now composing them, shall together never 
have less than forty-four Representatives. The counties of Attala, 
Winston, Noxubee, Kemper, Leake, Neshoba, -Lauderdale, Newton, 
Scott, Rankin, Clarke, Jasper, Smith, Simpson, Copiah, Franklin, Lincoln, 
Lawrence, Covington, Jones, Wayne, Greene, Perry, Marion, Pike, Pearl 
River, Hancock, Harrison, and Jackson, or the territory now composing 
them, shall together never have less than forty-four Repesentatives ; nor 
shall the remaining counties of the State, or the t-erritory now composing 
them, ever have less than forty-four Representatives. A reduction in 
the number of Senators and Representatives may be made by the Legis- 
lature if the same be uniform in each of the three said divisions; but the 
number of Representatives shall not be less than one hundred, nor more 
than one hundred and thirty-three, nor the number of Senators less than 
thirty, nor more than forty-five, provided that new counties hereafter 
created shall be given at least one Representative until the next succeed- 
ing apportionment. (Laws 1904, ch. 172). 
(1869, Art. IV, Sees. 34 and 35.) 



ARTICLE XIV. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

Sec. 257. The political year of the State of Mississippi shall corn- 
mence on the first Monday of January in each year. 
/ (1869, Art. IV, Sec. 6, and Art. XII, Sec. i.) 

The terms of all State and county elective oflficers must begin 
on this date. Williams v. State, 49 Miss., 640. 

Sec. 258. The credit of the State shall not be pledged or loaned in aid 
of any person, association, or corporation; and the State shall not become 
a stockholder in any corporation or association, nor assume, redeem, sectrre, 
or pay any indebtedness or pretended indebtedness alleged to be due by 
the State of Mississippi to any person, association, or corporation wliat- 
soevcr, claiming the same as owners, holders, or assignees of any bond 
or bonds, now generally known as "Union Bank" bonds and "Planters 
Bank" bonds. 

(1832, Art. VII, Sec. 9; 1869, Art. XII, Sec. 5, and ajnend- 
ment i.) 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1253 

Sec. 259. No county seat shall be removed unless such removal be 
authorized by two-thirds of the electors of the county voting therefor; 
but when the proposed removal shall be toward the center of the coimty, 
it may be made when a majority of the electors participating in the 
election shall vote therefor. 

This section authorizes any taxpayer to enjoin violation of its 
provisions, although the Attorney-General and district attorney, 
either or both, may have refused to intervene. Simpson County 
V. Buckley, 8i Miss., 474 (33 So., 650). 

The section has no application to an act which provides for 
an election to determine the question of removal of the seat of 
justice of a county judicial district. Hinton v. Perry County, 
84 Miss., 536 (36 So., 565). 

This section probably has no application to a statute provid- 
ing for an. election to determine the question of removal of a 
seat of justice of one of the judicial districts of a county having 
two such districts. Hinton v. Perry Co., 84 Miss., 537 (36 So., 

56s). 

If applicable it requires a two-thirds vote unless the removal 
be towards the center of the district, in which case a majority 
vote is sufficient. lb. 

By the terms of this section county seats throughout the State 
became fixed at the place where they were then located. They 
must remain until removed as prescribed in this section. County 
V. Buckley, 85 Miss., 729 (38 So., 104). 

Whether the Legislature can restrict the voters in the selection 
of a county site to a designated point. Quaere. lb. 

Sec. 260. No new county shall be formed unless a majority of the 
qualified electors voting in each part of the county or counties proposed 
to be dismembered and embraced in the new county, shall separately vote 
therefor; nor shall the boundary of any judicial district in a county be 
changed, unless, at an election held for that purpose, two-thirds of those 
voting assent thereto. The elections provided for in this and the section 
next preceding shall not be held in any county oftenor than once in four 
years. No new county shall contain less than four hundred square 
-^Piniles; nor shall any existing county be reduced below that size. 

(1817, Art. yi. Sec. 19; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 17; 1869, Art. 
IV, Sec. 37.) 

This section does not prevent the Legislature from dividing 
a county into two judicial districts, Alfred v. State, 37 Miss., 
296. 

The last clause of the section limits legislative discretion only 
as to area. Portwood v. Montgomery Co., 52 Miss., 523. 

The section has no application to changes in the boundaries 
of counties. Lindsley v. Coahoma County, 69 Miss., 815 (11 
So., 336). 



1254 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

The section expressly recognizes that there may be separate 
judicial districts in a county. lb. 

The section has no application to an act which provides for an 
election to determine the question of removal of the seat of justice 
of a county judicial district. Hinton v. Perry County, 84 Miss., 
536 (36 So., 565). 

The Act of 1902, p. 172, providing for an election to determine 
the question of the removal of the seat of justice of the first 
judicial district of Perry County does not violate this section. 
Hinton v. Perry Coi-mty, 84 Miss., 537 (36 So., 565). 

Sec. 261. The expenses of criminal prosecutions, except those before 
iustices of the peace, shall be borne by the county in which such prose- 
cutions shall be begun; and all net fines and forfeitures shall be paid 
into the treasury of such county. Defendants, in cases of conviction, 
may be taxed with the costs. 

The section took effect on the adoption of the Constitution, 
November i, 1890; and was not suspended by Sec. 274. Warren 
County v. Stone, 69 Miss., 375 (11 So., 4). 

The fines provided for by statute (Code 1880, § 1050; Code 
1892, § 3552: Code 1906, § 4050) to be imposed on railroads for 
failure to maintain signs at road crossings are not within the 
section. Board of Education v. Mobile, etc., R. R. Co., 71 
Miss., 500 (14 So., 445)- 

Sec. 262. The board of supervisors shall have power to provide 
homes or farms as asylums for those persons who, by reason of age, 
infirmity, or misfortune, may have claims upon the sympathy and aid 
of society; and the Legislature shall enact suitable laws to prevent 
abuses by those having the care of such persons. ~ 
(1869, Art. XII, Sec. 29.) 

Sec. 263. The marriage of a white person with a negro or mulatto, 
or person who shall have one-eighth or more of negro blood, shall be 
tmlawful and void. 

Sec. 264. No person shall be a grand or petit juror unless a qualified 
elector and able to read and write; but the want of any such qualification 
in any juror shall not vitiate any indictment or verdict. The Legislature 
shall provide by law for procuring a list of persons so qualified, and the 
drawing therefrom of grand and petit jurors for each term of the circuit 
court. 

The section does not discriminate between the races, nor does 
it violate the Constitution of the United States. Gibson v. 
Mississippi, 162 U. S., 565; Williams v. Mississippi, 170 U. S., 
213. 

The section was suspended in its operation by Section 274. 
Nail V. State, 70 Miss., 32. 



« 
FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THB STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 1255 

The section, construed with Section 244, requires a juror to be 
able to read any section of the Constitution. Mabry v. State, 
71 Miss., 716 (14 So., 267). 

An objection that a juror is an alien and therefore not a 
qualified elector cannot be made under this section after verdict. 
Fulcher v. State, 82 Miss., 630 (35 So., 170). 

It is not cause for reversing a conviction of murder that i^ was 
discovered after verdict that one of the jvurors was not a qualified 
elector, and had not been drawn on the venire, but had been 
stmimoned by mistake in place ot a person of the same name 
who was drawn. Tolbert v. State, 71 Miss., 180 (14 So., 462). 

The object of this section was to provide a method whereby 
duly qualified jurorp might be procured, but the details of the 
plan were committed to the judgment of the Legislature- Posey 
V. State, 86 Miss., 151 (38 So., 324). 

The language expressly negatives the idea that the validity of 
an indictment or verdict was to be dependent on the qualifica- 
tion of the jurors composing the panel. lb. 

Sec. 265. No person who denies the existence of a Supreme Being 
shall hold any office in this State. 

(1817, Art. VI, Sec. 6; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. 5; 1869, Art. XII. 
Sec. 3.) 

Sec. 266. No person holding or exercising the rights or powers of any 
office of honor or profit, either in his own right or as a deputy, or while 
otherwise acting for or in the name or by the authority of another, under 
any foreign government, or under the government of the United States, 
shall hold or exercise in any way the rights and powers of any office of 
honor or profit under the laws or authority of this State, except notaries 
commissioners of deeds, and United States Commissioners. 

(1817, Art. Ill, Sec. 27, and Art. VI, Sec. 15; 1832, Art. VII, 
Sec. 13; 1869, Art. XII, Sec. 3.) 

The office of city assessor is an office held within the authority 
of the State within this section. Kierskey v. Kelly, 80 Miss., 
803 (31 So., 901). 

The only thing prohibited by this section is the actual holding 
of the two incompatible offices at the same time. lb. 

One kept out of the office by a contest for it is not holding the 
office. lb. 

Sec. 267. No person elected or appointed to any office or employment 
of profit under the laws of this State, or by virtue of any ordinance of 
any municipality of this State, shall hold such office or employment 
without personally devoting his time to the performance of the duties 
thereof. 

The section does not affect the right of the Superintendent of 
the Institute for the Blind to recover upon a contract for pro- 
fessional services as a physician, rendered during a short absence 



1256 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

[ in the summer vacation when all the pupils of the institution 

had been removed to their homes. Fairley v. Western, etc., Co., 
73 Miss., 6 (i8 So., 796). 

I Sec. 268. All officers elected or appointed to any office in this State, 

j. except judges and members of the Legislature, shall, before entering 

[ upon the discharge of the duties thereof, take and subscribe the following 

! oath: "I, , do solemnly swear [or affirm] that I will faith- 

[■ fully support the Constitution of the United States and'the Constitution 

I . of the State of Mississippi, and obey the laws thereof; that I am not 

i disqualified from holding the office of ; that I will faithfully 

■ discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. So 

help me God." 
I (181 7, Art. VI, Sec. i; 1832, Art. VII, Sec. i; 1869, Art. XII, 

[ Sec. 26.) 

[ The act of an officer who has not taken the oath is not void. 

[: ' Rhodes v. McDonald, 24 Miss., 418; Marshall v. Hamilton, 41 

r Miss., 229; Cooper v. Moore, 44 Miss., 386. 

Unless a statute declares them so. McNutt v. Lancaster, 9 
Smed. & M., 570; Pickens v. McNutt, 12 Smed. & M., 651. 

Sec. 269. Every devise or bequest of lands, tenements, or heredita- 

'• ' ments, or any interest therein, of freehold or less than freehold, either 

l' present or future, vested or contingent, or of any money directed to be 

raised by the sale thereof, contained in any last Vvill and testament, or 

codicil, or other testamentary writing, in favor of any religious or ecclesi- 

V astical corporation, sole or aggregate, or any religious or ecclesiastical 

society, or to any religious denomination or association of persons, or to 

any person or body politic, in trust, either express or implied, secret or 

I ■ resulting, either for the use and benefit of such religious corporation, 

r society, denomination, or association, or for the purpose of being given 

•. or appropriated to charitable uses or purposes, shall be null and void, 

and the heir at law shall take the same property so devised or bequeathed, 

as though no testamentary disposition had been made. 

The section applies to wills made before the adoption of the 
Constitution, where the testator did not die until afterwards. 
Blackbourn v. Tucker, 72 Miss., 735 (17 So., 737). 

Under the section, a will giving lands and personal property 
to an educational association in trust for erecting and maintain- 
ing a college is void as to the realty. lb. 

Sec. 270. Every legacy, gift, or bequest of money or personal property, 
or of any interest, benefit, or use therein, either direct, implied, or other- 
wise, contained in any last will and testament or codicil, in favor of any 
religious or ecclesiastical corporation, sole or aggregate, or any religious 
or ecclesiastical society, or to any religious denomination or association, 
either for its own use or benefit, or for the purpose of being given or 
appropriated to charitable uses, shall be null and void, and the distributees 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 1257 

shall take the same as though no such testamentary disposition had been 
made. 

Under the section, a will giving lands and personal property to 
an educational association in trust for erecting and maintaining 
a college is valid as to the personality. Blackbourn v. Tucker, 
72 Miss., 735 (17 So., 737). 

The section applies to wills made before the adoption of the 
Constitution, where the testator did not die until afterwards. lb. 

Sec. 271. The Legislature may provide for the consolidation of exist- 
ing counties, if a majority of the qualified electors of such counties voting 
at an election held for that purpose shall vote therefor. 

Sec. 272. The Legislature shall provide by law pensions for indigent 
soldiers and sailors who enlisted and honorably served in the Confederate 
Army or Navy in the late Civil War, who are now resident in this State, 
and are not able to earn a support by their own labor. Pensions shall 
also be allowed to the indigent widows of such soldiers or sailors now 
dead, when from age or disease they cannot earn a support. Pensions 
shall also be allowed to the wives of such soldiers or sailors upon the 
death of the husband, if disabled and indigent as aforesaid. Pensions 
granted to widows shall cease upon their subsequent marriage. 

ARTICLE XV. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

Sec. 273. Whenever two-thirds of each house of the Legislature 
shall deem any change, alteration, or amendment necessary to this 
Constitution, such proposed change, alteration, or amendment, shall be 
read and passed by a two-thirds vote of each house respectively, on each 
day, for three several days; public notice shall then be given by the Secre- 
tary of State, at least three months preceding an election, at which th< 
qualified electors shall, vote directly for or against such change, alteration, 
or amendment; and if more than one amendment shall be submitted a^ 
one time, they shall be submitted in such manner and form that the 
people may vote for or against each amendment separately; and if it 
shall appear that a majority of the qualified electors voting shall have 
voted for the proposed change, alteration, or amendment, then it shall 
be inserted by the next succeeding Legislature as a part of this Constitu- 
tion, and not otherwise. 

(181 7, Art. "Mode of Revising," etc.. Sec. i; 1832, Art. "Mode 

of Re\'ising," etc.. Sec. i; 1869, Art. 13.) 

It is essential to a valid amendment that two-thirds of the 

members of each house shall vote in favor of the same on three 

several days. Green v. Weller, 32 Miss., 650. 

-Whether the submission to the people of an amendment to the 

Constitution be legal or illegal is a judicial question, and not a 

political or legislative one. State v. Powell, 77 Miss., 543 

(27 So., 927). 



1268 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OP MISSISSIPPI. 

Whether the people have or have not adopted a submitted 
amendment to the Constitution is a judicial question, and not 
a political or legislative one. lb. 

The submission of more than one proposed amendment to 
the Constitution in such manner and form that the people can- 
not vote for or against each separately, is unlawful, and the 
courts will determine whether a proposal, without reference 
to its form, embodies one or more amendments. lb. 

An amendment to the Constitution, under the section, has not 
been adopted if it failed to receive a majority of the votes cast, 
including all those voting at the election, whether they vote for 
or against the amendment or only for candidates for office. lb. 

If a proposed amendment to the Constitution be submitted at 
an election at which officers are voted for, the double purpose 
of the election does not make it two elections ; and all votes cast 
at the election are to be counted in determining whether the 
amendment be or be not adopted, the election on the amendment 
not being special or separable. lb. 

SCHEDULE. 



That no inconvenience may arise from the changes in the Constitution 
of this State, and in order to carry the new Constitution into complete 
operation, it is hereby declared that — 

Sec. 274. The laws of this State now in force, not repugnant to this 
Constitution, shall remain in force until amended or repealed by the 
Legislature, or until they expire by limitation. All statute laws of this 
State repugnant to the provisions of this Constitution, except as pro- 
vided in the next three sections, shall continue and remain in force until 
the first day of April, A. D. 1892, unless soonerrepealedby the Legislature. 
The section did not suspend the operation of Sec. 261. Warren 
County V. Stone, 69 Miss., 375 (11 So., 4). 

The section suspended Sec. 264. Nail v. State, 70 Miss., 32 
(II So.. 793). 

The section continued in force the existing statute (Code 1880, 
§ 531), fixing the time for redemption from tax sales, until April 
I, 1892, notwithstanding Sec. 79. Judah v. Brothers, 71 Miss., 
414 (14 So., 455). 

The section did not suspend Sec. 171, as to jurisdictional 
amount. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co. v. Brookhaven, etc., Co., 71 
Miss., 663 (16 So., 252). 

The section did not suspend Sec. 104. Adams v. Illinois, etc., 
R. R. Co., 71 Miss., 752 (15 So., 640). 

The section suspended Sec. 79 and the right to redeem land 
from a tax sale made in March, 1891, was limited, under existing 
statutes (Code 1880, § 531), to one year after the sale. LeBlanc 
v. Illinois, etc., R. R. Co., 72 Miss., 669 (18 So., 381). 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OP THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1259 

Sec. 275. All laws of this State which are repugnant- to the following 
portions of this Constitution shall be repealed by the adoption of this 
Constitution, to wit: Laws repugnant to — 

(o) All the ordinances of this convention; 

(b) The provisions of Sec. 183, prohibiting counties, cities, and 
towns from voting subscriptions to railroad and other corporations or 
associations ; 

(c) The provisions of Sees. 223 to 226, inclusive, of Art. 10, pro- 
hibiting the leasing of penitentiary convicts. 

Sec. 276. All laws of the State which are repugnant to the provisions 
of Sees. 240 to 253, inclusive, of Art. 12, on the subject of franchise and 
elections, shall be and remain in force until the first day of January, A. 
D. 1 89 1, and no longer. 

The section suspended Sec. 241. Nail v. State, 70 Miss., 32 
(11 So., 793). 

*Sec. 277. All laws of this State which are repugnant to the provisions 
of Art. 13, Sees. 254 to 256, inclusive, on the subject of apportionment 
of Representatives and Senators in the Legislature, shall be and remain 
in force until the first day of October, A. D. 1891, but no longer. 

Sec. 278. The Governor shall, as soon as practicable, appoint three 
suitable persons, learned in the law, as commissioners, whose duty it 
shall be to prepare and draft such general laws as are contemplated in 
this Constitution, and such other laws as shall be necessary and proper 
to put into operation the provisions thereof and as may be appropriate 
to conform the general statutes of the State to the Constitution. Said 
commissioners shall present the same, when prepared, to the Legislature 
at its next regular session; and the Legislature shall provide reasonable 
compensation therefor. 

Sec. 279. All writs, actions, causes of action, proceedings, prosecu- 
tions, and rights of individuals and bodies corporate, and of the State, 
and charters of incorporation shall continue; and all indictments which 
shall have been fouud, or which shall hereafter be found, and all prose- 
cutions begun, or that may be begun, for any crime or offense committed 
before the adoption of this Constitution may be proceeded with and upon 
as if no change had taken place. 

Section applied. Board of Education v. Mobile, etc., R. R. 
Co., 71 Miss., 500 (14 So., 445). 

A corporation which, since the adoption of the Constitution, 
has lost its individual corporate existence by a consolidation with 
another company, can claim no benefit under the section of a 
previous exemption from taxation of one of its constituent 
companies. Adams v. Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co., 77 Miss., 194 
(24 So., 200, 317; 28 So., 956); Yazoo, etc., R. R. Co. v. Adams, 
180 U. S., I. 



1260 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 

( - Sec. 280. For the trial and determination of all suits, civil and 

criminal, begun before the adoption of this Constitution, the several 
t courts of this State shall continue to exercise in said suits the powers 

t and jurisdictions heretofore exercised by them; for all other matters said 

i - courts are continued as organized courts under this Constitution, with 

such powers and jurisdiction as is herein conferred on them respectively. 

{ Sec. 281. All fines, penalties, forfeitures, and escheats accruing to the 

i State of Mississippi under the Constitution and laws heretofore in force 

shall accrue to the use of the State of Mississippi under this Constitution, 

except as herein otherwise provided. 

Sec. 282. All recognizances, bonds, obligations, and all other instru- 
ments entered into or executed before the adoption of this Constitution, 
to the State of Mississippi, or to any State, county, public or municipal 
ofScer or body, shall remain binding and valid, and the rights and liabil- 
ities upon the same shall be continued, and may be prosecuted as pro- 
vided by law. 

Sec. 283. All crimes and misdemeanors and penal actions shall be 
tried, prosecuted and punished as though no change had taken place, 
until otherwise provided by law. 

Sec 284. All officers — State, district, county, and municipal — now in 
office in this State, shall be entitled to hold the respective offices now 
held by them, except as otherwise herein provided, and_until the expira- 
tion of the time for which they w^ere respectively elected or appointed, 
and shall receive the compensation and fees now fixed by the statute 
laws in force when this Constitution is adopted. 

Sec. 285. The adoption of this Constitution shall not have the efTect, 
nor shall it be construed, to revive or put in force any law heretofore 
abrogated or repealed. 

This Constitution, adopted by the people of Mississippi in convention 
assembled, shall be in force and effect front and after this, the first day of 
November, A. D. 1890. 

8. S. CALHOON, 
President and Delegate from. Hinds County. 

Ratification of the Constitution by the people was unnecessary 
to its validity. Sproule v. Frederick, 69 Miss., 898 (11 So., 47^). 

R. F. Abbay, Delegate from Tunica County. 
J. L. Alcorn, Delegate from Coahoma County. 
R. H. Allen, Delegate from Tishomingo County. 
D. B, Arnold, Delegate from Panola County. 
Arthur Arrington, Delegate from Jones County. 
John A. Bailey, Delegate from Lauderdale County. 
John R. Baird, Delegate from Sunflower County. 
W. L. Bassett, Delegate from Neshoba County. 
D. R, Barnett, Delegate from Yazoo County. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. 1261 

« 

T. P. Bell, Delegate from Kemper County. 
J. R. BiNFORD, Delegate from Montgomery County. 
H. I. Bird, Delegate from Lawrence County. 
John A. Blair, Delegate from State at Large. 

B. B. Boone, Delegate from, Prentiss County. 
J. B. BooTHE, Delegate frotn State at Large. 
W. A. Boyd, Delegate from Tippah County. 
D. Bunch, Delegate from Yazoo County. 
R. B. Campbell, Delegate from Washington County, 
J. P. Carter, Delegate from Perry County. 
J. B. Chrisman, Delegate from Lincoln County. 

C. S. Coffey, Delegate from Jefferson County. 
J. W. Cutrer, Delegate from Coahoma County. 
Marye Dabney, Delegate from Warren County. 
R. A. Dean, Delegate from Lafayette County. 
Walter M. Denny, Delegate from Jackson County. 
Geo. G. Dillard, Delegate from Noxubee County. 
Geo. L. Donald, Delegate from Clarke County. 
G. W. Dyer, Delegate from Panola County. 
J. W. Edwards, Delegate from Oktibbeha County. 
A. J. Ervin, Delegate from Lowndes County. 
W. S. Eskridge, Delegate from Tallahatchie County 
W. S. Parish, Delegate from Issaquena County. 

D. S. Fearing, Delegate from Hinds County. 
W. S. Featherston, Delegate from Marshall County. 
J. E. Ferguson, Delegate from Newt07i County. 
John W. Fewell, Delegate from State at Large. 
Geo. J. Finley, Delegate from Marshall County. 
J. D. Fontaine, Delegate from Pontotoc County. " 
T. S. Ford, Delegate from State at Large. | 
J. Z. George, Delegate from State at Large. ^ 
F. M. Glass, Delegate from Attala Comity. j 
A. B. Guynes, Delegate from Copiah County. I 
D. T. Guyton, Delegate from Attala County. i 
F. M. Hamblet, Delegate from Quitman County. I 
J. G. Hamilton, Delegate from Yazoo and Holmes Counties. \ 
T. L. Hannah, Delegate from Choctaw County. i 
W. P. Harris, Delegate from Hinds County. \ 
T. T. Hart, Delegate from Hinds County. 

N. C. Hathorn, Delegate from Covington County. 

John Henderson, Delegate from Clay County. 

Elliot Henderson, Delegate from Harrison County. ' | 

Patrick Henry, Delegate from State at Large. j 

C. K. Holland, Delegate from Calhoun County. ; 

H. S. Hooker, Delegate from Holmes County. 

R. G. Hudson, Delegate from State at Large. | 

Thos. D. Isom, Delegate from Lafayette County. ' 1 



1262 FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI • 

J. H. Jamison, Delegate from Noxubee County. 

D. S. Johnson, Delegate from Chickasaw County. 
James Henry Jones, Delegate from State at Large. 
Walter L. Keirn, Delegate from Holmes County. 
James Kennedy, Delegate from Clay County. 

J. KiTTRELL, Delegate from Greene County. 

W. J. Lacey, Delegate from Chickasaw County. 

Robert Charles Lee, Delegate from Madison County. 

S. D. Lee, Delegate from Oktibbeha County. 

T. P. Lee, Delegate from Yazoo County. 

Geo. H. Lester, Delegate from Yalobusha County. 

W. F. Love, Delegate from Amite County. 

L. W. Magruder, Delegate from State at Large. 

E. J. Marett, Delegate from Marshall County. 

C, B. Martin, Delegate from Alcorn and Prentiss Counties. 

Edward Mayes, Delegate from State at Large. 

Monroe McClurg, Delegate from Carroll County. 

Will T. McDonald, Delegate from Benton County. 

T. J. McDonnell, Delegate from Monroe County. 

J. H. McGehee, Delegate from Franklin County. 

G. T. McGehee, Delegate from Wilkinson County. 

F. A. McLain, Delegate from Amite and Pike Counties. 
Wm. C. McLean, Delegate from Grenada County. 

A. G, McLaurin, Delegate from Smith County. 

A. J. McLaurin, Delegate from Rankin County. 

H. J. McLaurin, Delegate from Sharkey County. 

J. S. McNeily, Delegate from State at Large. 

Geo. p. Melchoir, Delegate from Bolivar County. 

T. L. Mendenhall, Delegate from Simpson County. 

Irvin Miller, Delegate from Leake County. 

Isaiah T. Montgomery, Delegate from Bolivar County. 

W. H. Morgan, Delegate from Leflore County. 

J. L. Morris, Delegate from Wayne County. 

H. L". MuLDROW, Delegate from State at Large. 

J. R. MuRFF, Delegate from Monroe County. 

T. V. Noland, Delegate from Wilkinson County. 

J. W. Odom, Delegate from DeSoto County. 

S, E. Packwood, Delegate from Pike County. 

J. K. P. Palmer, Delegate from Scott County. 

RoBT. C. Patty, Delegate frotn Noxubee County. 

A. J. Paxton, Delegate fruvn Washington County. 

C. O. Potter, Delegate from Union County- 

Sam Powel, Delegate from DeSoto County. 

J. R. Puryear, Delegate from Tate County. 

John H. Reagan, Delegate from Leake and Neu-ton Counties. 

Chas. K. Regan, Delegate from Claiborne County. 

L. P. Reynolds, Delegate from .Alcorn County. 



FOURTH CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI.* 1263 

L. J. Rhodes, Delegate from Lee County. 

W. C. Richards, Delegate from Lowndes County. 

S. W. Robinson, Delegate from Rankin County. 

J. P. Robinson, Delegate from Union County. 

J. J. Rottenberry, Delegate from Yalobusha County. 

J. S. Sexton, Delegate from State at Large. 

John M. Simonton, Delegate from Lee County, 

H. F. SiMRALL, Delegate from Warren County. 

John F. Smith, Delegate from Jasper County. 

Murray F. Smith, Delegate from Warren County, 

W. F. Spence, Delegate from Hancock County. 

H. M. Street, Delegate from Lauderdale County. 

T. W. Sullivan, Delegate from Carroll County. 

E. O. Sykes, Delegate from Monroe County. 

Allen Talbott, Delegate from, Benton and Tippah Counties. 

R. H. Taylor, Delegate from Panola County. 

R. H. Thompson, Delegate from Lincoln and Jefferson Counties, 

Steve H. Turner, Delegate from Itawamba County. 

T. S. Ward, Delegate from Madison County. 

O. C. Watson, Delegate from Winston County. 

W. C. Wilkinson, Delegate from Copiah County. 

Frank K. Winchester, Delegate from Adams County. 

Wm. D. Witherspoon, Delegate from Lauderdale, Kemper, and 

Clarke Counties. 
W. P. Wyatt, Delegate from Tate County. 
Wm. G. Yerger, Delegate from Washington County. 

Attest: R. E. WILSON, Secretary. 

Delegates who refused to sign the Constitution. — Gen. William T. 
Martin, of Adams; Frank Burkett, of Chickasaw; and John E. Gore, of 
Webster. 

Delegate absent and not signing. — A. G. Webb, of Marion. 

Delegate who died dtiring the convention. — N. D. Guerry, of Lowndes. 

Total, 134. 



INDEX. 



Abbeville, regarding battle of — 184. 

Act authorizing State government — 1 155- 1 157. 

Act authorizing Territorial government — 1 147- 1 148. 

Act creating Mississippi Territory — 1150. 

Act of Continental Congress — 279. 

Act of June 24, 1800 — 20. 

Adair, Charles Pinkney, sketch and picture of — 1080. 

Adams County, JNIississippi, officers of — 1097. 

Adams County, of Mississippi Territory, list of officers of — 11-14; list of con- 
servators of peace of, 11 ; list of court of general quarter sessions and other 
officers of, 11 ; list of justices of the peace of. 11-12; list of court of common 
pleas of, 12; list of justices and other civil officers of, 12; list of superior 
court and court of equity of, 12; list of militia officers of, 13-14. 

Adams, Gen. John — 159. 

Adams, John Jefferson, sketch and picture of — 1016. 

Adams, Mackdonel, sketch and picture of — 1082. 

Adams, Non Quincy, sketch and picture of— 1071. 

Adams, President — 19; regarding appointment of Gov. Sargent, 170; 1150. 

Adams, Robert H. — 129. 

Adams, Stephen — 141, 142, 148. 

Adams, Wirt, picture of — 958 ; sketch of, 960. 

Adjutant-General, office of — 961 ; salary of — 267. 

Agricultural experiment stations, regarding establishm.ent of — 189. 

Agricultural and IMcchanical College, regarding textile school for — 161 ; regard- 
ing establishment of, 187; historical sketch of, 286-29S ; picture of buildings 
of, 2S7, 297; trustees of, 288, 2Sq, 293. 294; regarding students of, 290-291; 
regarding first class of, 291; schools of, 291; value of work of, 291, 293; 
conduct of, 292; institute work of, 293; executive committee of. 294; de- 
partments of instruction of. 294-298; School of Agriculture of, 294; School 
of Engineering of, 295; School of Textile Industry of. 295; School of 
Chemistry of, 295; School of English of. 295. 296; School of Mathematics 
of, 296; School of Militiry Science and Tactics of, 296; School of History 
and Civics of, 296; School of Industrial Pedagogy of. 296: School of For- 
eign Languages of. 296; Preparatory Department of, 296; Experiment Sta- 
tion of, 296, 297; organization ot. 293-298. 

Agriculture and commerce, regarding Mississippi department of — 173, 189, 964; 
salary of commissioner of — 266. 

Alabama & Mississippi Railroad and Banking Company — 134. 

Alcorn Agricultural and ^lechanical College, picture of — 306; historical sketch 
of, 307-309- 

Alcorn County, officers of — 1097. 

Alcorn, Gov. James L., regarding senatorship of, 153; vs. Gov. Ames, 155; biog- 
raphv of, 156-157; regarding authorities for biography of. 157; regarding 
election of brigadier-general, 1S3; regarding inauguration of. resignation of, 
and important events in administration of, 185; regarding Mississippi seces- 
sion convention, 19S; portrait of, insert, between pp. 152-153. 

Alcorn, William A., Jr., sketch and picture of— 1044. 

Alden, regarding digest of — 273. 



I 1266 INDEX 

! " Alford, George Howard, sketch and picture of — 1074. 
I 'Allen, John, vs. Gov. McLaurin— 161. 

Allen, Marcellus H., sketch and picture of — 1091. 

Amendments to Constitution (1854-1857;— 182; (18(15)— 184. 

American dominion — 2. 
\ American products, regarding suspension of right of deposit of at New Orleans 

—173- 
! Ames, Gov. Adelbert, biography of, 155; regarding authorities for biography of, 
\ 155; regarding impeachment of, 155, i8b, 202, 203; vs. Gov. Alcorn, 157; re- 

I garding appointment by of R. C. Powers as sheriff, 157; regarding appoint- 

i ment military governor, 185; regarding inauguration of, 185; regarding in- 

l quiry into conduct of, 186; regarding resignation of, important events of 

administration of, 186; regarding ejection of Gov. Humphreys, 201, 202. 
I Amite County, officers of — 1098. 

! . Anderson, Albert Clarence, sketch and picture of — 1090. 
I Anderson, Robert Buckner, sketch of — 1043. 
I Anderson, William Dozier, sketch and picture of — 1022. 
I Andrews, Garnett, regarding digest of — 271. 
I Annexation of Cuba and Mexico, Gov. Quitman for — 137. 
I Apportionment of legislative representation — 988-991. 

I Appropriations, regarding Jefif Davis Beanvoir Memorial Home, list of — 311. 
• Architect, State, office of, created, 196; selection of for new capitol, 207. 

Archives and History, picture of seal of, H; director of. 31; Mississippi depart- 
ment, regarding establishment of, 188; regarding old Mississippi capitol, 205; 
salary of director of, 266; salary of assistant director of, 266; trustees of, 
953, 955- 
Army (provisional) of the Confederate States, list of general officers from Mis- 
sissippi— 947. 
^ Army of Mississippi, organization and operations of — 183. 
' Assembly, general, Mississippi, regarding Gov. Holmes — 127. 
Attala County, officers of — 1098. 
Attorneys-general, of Mississippi Territory, list of, 4; of State of JNlississippi 

(1818-1908). list of. 29-30. 
Attorney-general, salary of, 266; salary of assistant of, Jb6; salary of deputy 

of, 266; salary of stenographer of, 266. 
Auditors of Mississippi (1817-1908), list of, 30-31; of Mississippi Territory, list 

[' Auditor of public accounts, salary of, 266; office of, 956. 

Bailey, David Collins, sketch and picture of — 1037. 

Bailey, John Alson, sketch and picture of — 1005. 

Baird, Thomas Rupert, sketch and picture of — 1014. 

Banking privileges, in 1837 — 138. 

Bank of Mississippi, regarding establishment of — 20, 127, 175. 

Banks, George Hansel, sketch and picture of — 1004. 

Banks, Sutton — 171, 172. 

Barksdale, Ethelbert, vs. Gov. Lowry — 160. 

Barksdale, Gen. William, regarding Gov. Humphreys, 154; regarding Virginia 
campaign, 183; regarding Mississippi secession convention, 197. 

Barnard, Dr. F. A. P.. regarding University of Mississippi, 280; regarding alli- 
ance University of IMississippi and public schools, 2S0. 

Barnes, Thomas, speaker of first legislature. — 177. 

Barry. Frederick George, sketch and oicture of — ioti. 

Barry. William S., president Mississippi secession convention, 182, 197; delegate 
to Memtgomery convention, 183. 

Bay of Biloxi. regarding settlements — 164. 

Bealk, Benj., regarding Spanish boundary trouble — t68. 



. INDEX 1267 

• • 

Beals, Alf., regarding Mississippi Industrial Institute and College — 301. 

Beauregard, Gen., regarding military operations in Mississippi — 183. 

Beckley, John — 21, 

Bedford Quarries Co., regarding new State capitol — 211. 

Beeks, David Andrews, sketch and picture of — 1068. 

Belize Cemetery, Gov. AlcRae buried in — 149. 

Bell, Joseph— 144. 

"Bench and Bar of South and Southwest," book by Gov. Foote — 146. 

Bennett, H. S. — 142. 

Bennett, Oakley Adair, sketch and picture of — 1087, 

Bennett, Robert Eli, sketch and picture of — 1090. 

Bennett, William Thomas, sketch and picture of — 1036. 

Benoist, Gabriel — 168, 169, 170. 

Benton County, regarding Gov. ]Matthews, 142; officers of, 1099. 

Bernard, Joseph — 168, 169, 170. 

Biddle, Col., regarding ejection of Gov. Humphreys — 201, 202. 

Bienville, Gov. Jean Baptiste Le Moyne, regarding French dominion, 2, 164; 
regarding Mississippi colony, 164; regarding subduing Chickasaws, 165. 

Big Black, regardmg battle of — 183. 

Bilbo, Theodore Gilmore, sketch and picture of — 998. 

Biloxi, regarding Spanish dominion, i, 2; regarding French dominion, 164. 

Biloxi Indians, regarding native dominion — i. 

Bingaman, Adam L., vs. Gov. Quitman — 136, 171. 

Biographies of governors of Mississippi Territory — 19-23; of governors of Mis- 
sissippi, 127-163; of State officials, 951-972; of U. S. senators and representa- 
tives, 974-986; of State senators and representatives, 997-1094. 

Bird, Eldred L. H., sketch and picture of — 1059. 

"Black and Tan" convention in Mississippi — 185; regarding old Mississippi capi- 
tol, 195, 198, 200-201. 

Blakeslee, Henry Edward, picture of — 958; sketch of, 964. 

Bledsoe, Allen Taylor, regarding University of Mississippi — 279. 

Blind, State institution of — 181; sketch of, 320-322; picture of, 321. 

Boddie, Van Buren, sketch and picture of — 1085. 

Bolivar County, officers of — iioo. 

Bonds, repudiation of — 138. 

"Bonny Blue Flag, The," first rendition of — 198. 

Bourbon County, regarding establishment of — 165, 166. 

Bowers, E. J., picture of — 978; sketch of, 982-983. 

Bradford, Maj. A. B., vs. Gov. ^latthews, 142; regarding distinction of in 
Mexican war, 181. 

Brame &. Alexander, regarding court reports of — 269; regarding digest of — 271. 

Brandon, Gov. G. C, regarding appointment of Gov. Poindexter by — ^^129; biog- 
raphy of, 131-132; regarding authorities for biography of. 132; regarding 
inauguration of, 178; regarding important events of administration of, 179; 
portrait of, insert, between pp. 130-131. 

Brandon, Gerard — 131. 

Brashears. Eden — 171. 

Brashears, Tobias — 171. 

Breland, Eugene Walter, .'sketch and picture of — 104S. 

Breland, Robert Lee, sketch and picture of — 1007. 

Brewer, Earl L., vs. Gov. Noel — 189. 

Brice's Cross Roads, rcgardini' battle of — 184. 

Bridges, John Calhoun, sketch and picture of — 1044. 

Bringhurst, Prof., regarding new State capitol — 211. 

Briscoe, Parmenas- -141. 

Britt, John James, sketch and picture of — 103. 



1268 INDEX • 

Brook, Walker, senator, 14T-148; delegate to Montgomery convention, 183. 

Brooks, James — 171. 

Brooks, Samuel, regarding election first Mississippi treasurer — 177 

Brown, Gov. A. G., regarding portrait of Gov. Poindexter, 129; vs. Gov. Quit- 
man, 139; biography of, 140-142; regarding authorities for biography of, 142; 
regarding inauguration of, 180; regarding important events of aduunistration 
of, 181 ; portrait of, insert between pp. 140- 141 ; regarding Insane Asy- 
lum, 322. 

Brown, John, regarding raid of — 182. 

Brown, Joseph — 140. 

Brown Rebels — 141. 

Brown & Hemingway, regarding court reports of — 270. 

Browne, ^lontfort, regarding English dominion — 2. 

Broyles, Henry Franklin, sketch and picture of — 1067. 

Bruin, Judge Peter Bryan, regarding Mississippi territorial government — 19, 169, 
170, 171, 172, T150. 

Bruinsburg, regarding Grant and Burr — 309. 

Bryan, Wm. J., regarding Gov. Longino- -162. 

Bryant, Joseph Lewis, sketch and picture of — 1058. 

Buchanan, J. M., M.D., author, sketch of East Mississippi Insane Hospital — z^y. 

Buck, William J. — 951. 

Burkitt, Frank, sketch and picture of — 1041. 

Burnett, Jno., member first Mississippi Legislature — 172. 

Burr, Aaaron, regarding Gov. Williams — i},; regarding arrest of, 2^, 128; regard- 
ing Acting-Gov. Mead, 174; regarding arrival of in Mississippi Territory, 
174; regarding surrender of, 174; regarding break of bond of, 175; regarding 
arrest of, 175. 

Burrus, Charles Joseph, sketch and picture of— 1088. 

Burrus, John Crawford, sketch and picture of — 1015. 

Burrus, J. H. — 307. 

Burt, Col. Erasmus, regarding Virginia campaign, 183; regarding Deaf and 
Dumb Institute, 312, 313. 

Bush, Fred Marshall, sketch and picture of — looi. 

Byrd, Adam Monroe, biography of — 982; picture of, 987. 

Cadillac, Antoine de la Mothe. regarding French dominion — 2. 

Caldwell, Thomas Rogers, sketch and picture of — 1067. 

Calhoon, John, sketch and picture of — 1065. 

Calhoon, S. S., 160; president constitutional convention (1890), 188, 204; picture 
of, 968; biography of, 970. 

Calhoun County, officers of — iioo. 

Calhoun Institute, picture of — 199. 

California, regarding sectfonal questions from admission of, as state — 181. 

Callett, Francis, regarding Spanish dominion — 2. 

Callierves, Louis Hector de, regarding French dominion — i. 

Calloway, T. J. — 307. 

Calvit, ihos. — 171, 172. 174. 

Campbell, regarding code of — 274. 

Campbell, J. A. P., delegate to Montgomery convention — 183. 

Canby, Gen., regarding surrender cf (ien. Richard Taylor and Gen. Lee — 184. 

Candler, Ezekiel Samuel, biography of — 977 ; picture of, 987. 

Cannon, W. R. — 150. 

Canton, regarding battle near — 184. 

Capitol of Mississippi, new, reg;irding law providing for, 133; regarding erec- 
tion of. T79; regarding occupancy of, 180: regarding new, 188; picture of 
old (t839-1(X)3), 100; regarding yellow fever. 191: picture of senate cham- 
ber and of hall of representatives, old capitol, 192; regarding furniture of. 



INDEX • 12G9 

193 ; regarding scene in regarding speech of Rev. Harmon, 194 ; regarding great 
men and events. 195-107; piclure of new capitol, 20O; picture of east 
end of new capitol, 208; picture of main entrance of new capitol, 210; 
picture of central rotuiula under the dome, new capital, 212; regard- 
ing commissioners and superintendent of first State capitol. 191, 193; 
regarding removal from Jackson to Columbus and to Macon, 194, 198 ; 
regarding appropriation and cost of building old capitol, 196; regarding foun- 
dations of new capitol, 207; list of State capitol commissioners, 207; regard- 
ing description of new capitol, 209-213; picture of old capitol, opp. 196. 

Capitol Buildings of Mississippi — 191-213; regarding State capitol selected, 191; 
regarding historical, 191 ; regarding First State House, 193 ; regarding Story 
of the Old Building, 194-196; regarding The Builders, 196-197; regarding 
Ante-Bellum, 197; regarding The Secession Convention, 197-200; regarding 
The "Black and Tan" Convention, 200; regarding Viet Armis, 201-202; re- 
garding Impeachment, 202-203 ; regarding Last Speech of Jefferson Davis, 
203-204; regarding Convention of 1890, 204-205; regarding Nunc Dimittis, 
-205; regarding, the New Capitol, 207-213; picture of Old Capitol, opp. 196. 

Cardoza, T. W., regarding impeachment and resignation of — 155, 186, 203. 

Carney, Arthur — 171. 

Carondelet, Gov. Gen., regarding Spanish boundary treaty — 166; regarding 
Spanish reinforcements, 167; regarding succeeded by Gov. Gayoso. 

Carpet-baggers, regarding beginning of in Mississippi — 154; regarding old Mis- 
sissippi capitol, 195, 200. 

Carr, John David, sketch and picture of — T069. 

Carroll County, officers of — iioi. 

Carroll, Gen., regarding Gov. Poindcxter — 129. 

Carver, Eleazer, regarding manufacture of cotton gins — 175. 

"Casket of Reminiscences." book bv Gov. Foote — 146. 

Catlett, R. P.— 145. 

Cavender, John F., regarding chairs for assembly — 193. 

Cavett, Emmett D., sketch and picture of — 1070. 

Census, of Mississippi Territory — 175; of State (i860), 184; of State (1880), 187. 

Cession of Georgia to United States — 172. 

Chalmers, Col. Jas. R. — 183. 

Chamberlain, Jeremiah, regarding Oakland College — 307. 

Champion Hills, regarding battle of — 183. 

Chancellors, list of — 40. 41-43; State, 974. 

Charles I., regarding Spanish dominion — i, 2. 

Charles H., regarding Spanish dominion — T. - " 

Chester, Peter, regarding English dominion — 2. 

Chickasaw County, otticers of — tioi. 

Chickasaws, regarding native dominion — i : regarding union with Natchez In- 
dians. 165; regarding school lands. i8r. 

Chief executive officers of University of Mississippi — 281. 

Chocchumas. regarding native dominion — i. 

Choctaw County, officers of — iro2. 

Choctaw purchase, regarding Wayne County — 127; regarding counties organ- 
ized out of, 134. 

Choctaw school lands, law ff>r leaving — 142. 

Ch^ctaws, regarding native dominion— i ; regarding defeat of Natchez Indians. 
165. 

Church, at Columl)us, picture of — 190 

Church, tirst Protectant in .Missi-^xippi — 765. 

Circuit Court Judges, list of — 34-39; State, 972. 

Circuit judges and chancellors, salary of — 266. 

Civil and military otticers of original counties of Mississippi Ter., list of — 11-17. 



1270 INDEX 



\^ 



L Claiborne, Col. William — 20. 

I Claiborne County, of Mississippi, officers of — 1103. 

[ Claiborne County, of Mississippi Territory, list of officers of — 16. 

j Claiborne, Ferdinand, regarding Bank of Mississippi — 175. 

, Claiborne, Gen. F. L., regarding Sabine Expedition — 174; regarding troops of 

[ Mississippi Territory, 175; regarding attack on Escanahaha, 176. 

(Claiborne's History of Mississippi — 1150. 

[ Claiborne, J. F. H., regarding opinion of Gov. Quitman — 137. 

\ Claiborne, Gov. William C. C, portrait of (see frontispiece), biography of, 20-22; 

I regarding authorities for life of, 22; regarding appointment of, as governor, 

[ 128, 172; regarding arrival of in territory, 172; regarding first address of to 

\ legislature, 172; important events in administration of, 173; regarding letter 

[ to Madison, 1151; regarding departure of to receive Louisiana Purchase, 

[ 173 ; regarding governor of Louisiana Purchase and Mississippi Territory, 

I 173- 

i- Clark, Abraham, regarding Declaration of Independence — 952. 

i Clark, Gov. Charles, biography of — 150-152 ; regarding authorities for biography 

r of, 152; regarding election brigadier-general, 183; regarding inauguration of, 

I 184; regarding conduct of when arrested, 184; regarding important events 

in administration of, 184; portrait of, insert between 150-151. , 

Clark, Daniel, regarding introduction of Whitney's cotton gin — 166, 169, 170, 17T. 
! Clark, Gibson — 171. 

;j" Clark, John Bunyan, sketch and picture of — 1049. 
I Clarke County, officers of — 1103. 
I Clay County, ofhcers of — 1104. 

f Clay, Henry, regarding compromise of — 146; regarding old Mississippi capitol, 
195, 197. 

Clayton, A. M. — 180; delegate to Montgomery convention, 183. 
^ Clayton, Geo. R. — 141. 
' Clerk of House, salary of — 267. 

Clerks, of High Court of Errors and Appeals, list of — 32. 

Clerks of Supreme Court, list of — 32. 

Cluskey, M. W.— 141. ' 

Coahoma County, officers of — 1105. 

Coat of Arms, of Mississippi — opp. 274. 

Cochran, Geo. — 171. 
f Cocke, Chas. PL, regarding Girls' Industrial Institute — 300. 
i Code, Hutchinson's, regarding adoption of — 142. 

Code, Mississippi, regarding Poindexter's — 130; regarding of 1857, 153; regard- 
ing of 1906, 189. 

Cofteeville, regarding battle of — 183. 

Coleman, Jesse Rowe, sketch and picture of — 1087. 

Colonists, French, regarding Mississippi — 164; regarding troubles of with Span- 
ish, 166-170. 

Columbia, Mississippi, capitol — 191. 

Columbus Banking & Insurance Co. — T45. 

Columbus City, regarding Girls' Industrial Institute — 300. 

Commissioners, State capitol. list of — 207. 

Committee of Safety, regarding Spanish boundary trouble — 168; members of, 
168; regarding list of permanent committee, 170. 
- Compromise of 1850. regarding question of in Mississippi — 137. 
• Concord, regarding Spain— -71. 

Confederate Congress, regarding Gov. Foote — 146. 

Confederate States, Mississippi, one of — 183-184. 

Congress. Confederate— 146. 

Congressional districts of Mississippi (1846-1908) — 232-237; map of, 238. 



t ' 



INDEX ' 1271 

Congressional plan of reconstruction — 200. 

Congressmen, of Mississippi — 215-228. 

Conservators of peace, Alississippi Territory, list of — 171. 

Constitution, regarding important provisions of, 133; first, fac simile of first 
page of — 1 158; of 1817, outline of, 1159-1160; of 1832, outline of, 1163; of 
1869, outline of, 1167; of 1890, outline of, 1170-1171; fourth constitution 
(1890), 1172-1263. 

Constitution, of Confederate States, regarding ratification of — 183. 

Constitutional convention of Mississippi (1817) — 128, 176, 177, 191; regarding 
Gov. Poindexter, 129; regarding Gov. Brandon, 131; regarding Gov. Scott, 
132; members of, 1161; fac simile of signatures of members of, 1162. 

Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1832) — 179, 193; regarding Gov. Bran- 
don, 132 ; regarding Gov. Scott, 133 ; regarding Gov. Runnels, 135 ; regarding 
Gov. Quitman, 136; members of, 1164. 

Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1849-) — 143,181. 

Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1861) — 147, 182, 183; members of, 



f T165-T166. 



Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1865) — 153, 184, 185, 200. 
Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1868), members of — 1168-1169. 
Constitutional Convention, of Mississippi (1890) — 161, 188, 204, 205; members 

of, 1260-1263. 
Constitutional Convention, of Texas, regarding Gov. Runnels — 135. 
Constitutional Convention, at Washington — 128. 
Contents, Table of — ; Part I., XI; Part II., opp. 24; Part III., opp. 190; Part 

IV., 275; Part v., 383; Part VI., 949; Part VIL, 1095; Part VIII., 1145. 
Continental Congress, regarding last act — 279. 
Contractors, Capitol — 207. 
Convention (1851) — 181. 

Convention, ''Black and Tan" — 185 ; regarding reconstruction, 200. 
Convention, Democratic State (1875) — 186. 
Convention, Mississippi, regarding secession — 182, 183, 197; list of delegates 

of, 183. 
Convention, Nashville, regarding protection of Southern rights — 181. 
Convention, Secession — 197. 
Convention, State, at Jackson — 184. 
Coopvvood, Thomas, vs. Gov. Brown — 141. 
Copiah County, officers of — 1105. 
Copper coins, in French colonies — 164. 

Corruption, growth of, 185; regarding Gov. Ames' administration, 185, 1S6. 
Cotes worth, Judge — 152. 
Cotton gin — 166. 

Cotton plant, picture of — insert, between 1 144- 1 145. 
Cottonseed oil, regarding Sir William Dunbar's opinion of — 171. 
Cottonwood, regarding Gov. Tucker — 140. 
Counties, of Mississippi of 1800 — 175; of 1810, 175, 239-240; population of, 241- 

242. 
County government — 1097-1144. 
Courthouse, Columbus — 199. 
^Court of Chancery, Superior — 40. 
Covington County, officers of — 1106. 
Cowert, Joseph Oliver, sketch and picture of— 1054. 
Cox, John Monroe, sketch and picture of — 1072. 
Cox, Zachariah. regarding arrest of — 171. 
Cranford, William I.eroy, sketch and picture of — 1046. 
Creeks, regarding attack of on I'^ort Minis— 175. 
Critz, F. A., vs. Gov. Vardaman, regarding Gov. Longino — 161, 162, 163. 



1272 INDEX 

Cuba, regarding liberation of — 137. 

Cunningham, James A., sketch and picture of — 1021. 

Curd, Cyrus Haiden, sketch and picture of — 1066. 

Cushman, John F., regarcHng court reports of— jOS. 

Darden, George Leshe, sketch and picture of — 1019. 

Dauligny, Francis, regarding Spanish dominion — 2. 

Davis. A. K., lieutenant-governor — 155. 

Davis, Isaac N., vs. Gov. Brown — 141. 

Davis, Lieut.-Gov. A. K., regarding impeacliment of — 155, 186, 203. 

-Davis, Jefferson, vs. Gov. F'oote — 146; regarihng resignation of, 146. 148; regard- 
ing Mexican war, 180; regarding appointment Secretary of War. 181; re- 
garding announcement by of Mississippi withdrawal from Union, 183; re- 
garding election of, as major-general, 183. 198; regarding election of Presi- 

i- dent of Confederate States, 183; regarding call of for ^Mississippi troops, 183; 

i regarding death of, 187; regarding old ^lissibsippi capitol, 195; regarding 
last speech of, 203, 204. 

Davis. Reuben, regarding opinion of, regarding Gov. McNutt — 139; regarding 
Gov. Brown, 142; regarding Gov. Matthews, 143; regarding Gov. Foote, 146; 
regarding Gov. McRae, 148; vs. Gov. Clark, 151. 

Davis, William Edward, sketch and picture of — 1073. 

Deaf and Dumb, regarding establishment of institution for — 182; regarding 
new institution of, 189; salary of superintendent of, 2O7 ; history of, 311- 

' ' 320; regarding commissioners of, 316. 

Dean, R A State capitol commissioner — -^07; sketch and picture of, 1017. 

Debt, in Mississippi, in reconstruction period — 185. 

Dedication, V. 

Dees, Mark Ashley, sketch and picture of — 1054. 

De L'Epinay, regarding French dominion — 2. 

Deficit, in accounts, of State Treasurer (iS';2) — 188. 

Delegates, congressional, of Mississippi — 215-216. 

Democratic State convention (1875) — 186. 

Democratic victory (1875) — 186. 

Dent. Loui> — 156. 

Denton, William Rice, sketch and picture of — 1059. 

Deposit, of American products, at New Orleans, regarding refusal of right of — 
173. - 

DeSoto County, officers of — 1106. 

DeSoto, Flernando, regarding coming of to Mississippi — II.; regarding in Mis- 
sissippi — 164. 

Devenport. las. — 171. 

D'Iberville, Pierre Lemoine — i ; regarding Mississippi colony, 164. 

Dicken, James Albert, sketch and picture of — 1052. 

Dickinson. Samuel — 157. 

Dickson. Secretary of State — 135. 

Dickson. Roger — 160. 

Dinsmore, Silas, regarding conducting Aaron Burr to Washington — 175 

Dison, Jonas Franklin, sketch and picture of — 1053. 

District attorneys, salary of — 267. 

District of Mobile, regarding annexation — 175. 

Dixon. Roger — 171. 

Dobyns, J. R.. author historical sketch of institution for Deaf and Dumb — 311. 

Doherty, Charles Wiley, sketch and picture of — 1082. 

Donu'nion of Mississippi— native, i; Spanish, i, 2; French, i; English, 2; Ameri- 
can, 2. 

Dorroh. Iva Lamar, sketch and picture of — 1070. 

J)r.-nnatic events of old capitol — 195. 

! 

i 



INDEX 1273 

Dramatic incident regarding secession convention on first flag — 198. 

Drane, Jas., regarding Gov. McW'illie — 150. 

Duel, challenge to from Poinciexter to (iov. Williams — 23. 

Dugan, George, regarding new State capitol — 213. 

Dunbar, Jas., regarding race for governor — 141. 

Dunbar, Sir William, regarding cottonseed oil — 171. 

Dunbar, William. Jr. — ijr. 

Durnford, Elias, regarding English dominion — 2. 

East Mississippi Flospital for Insane, salary of superintendent of — 267; his- 
torical sketch of — 327-330; picture of. 328. 

East, William Jasper, sketch and picture of — ^1019. 

Economy, in public expenditures — 187. 

Education before and after Civil War. zyS; salary of superintendent of, 266; 
salary of clerk of superintendent of. 2C6 : board of. 967. 

Education of women in Mississippi — 298. 

Edwards, Benj. W.. vs. Gov. McXutt— 138. 

Edwards, George Robert, biographical sketch of — 957; picture of, 558. 

Eggleston, "Buzzard," regarding "Black and Tan" Convention — 200. 

Eighteenth Mississippi Regiment. C. S. A. — 141. 

Eighth Congressional District, counties in — 985. 
. Election (1875)— 186. 

Election commissioners — 967. 

Election returns, in Mississippi — 248-265. 

Eliot, John, regarding English dominion — 2. 

Elizabeth Academy, regarding establishment of — 177. 

Ellett, Henry T., regarding Mississippi code (1857) — 153. 

Ellicott. Andrew, regarding fixing southern boundary of U. S. — 166, 167, 168. 

Ellicott's Spring, regarding yellow fever — 170. 

Ellis, Abraham — 171. 

Ellis, Jno. — 171. 

Ellis, Powhatan, regarding appointment of by Gov. Leake — 131; regarding Su- 
preme Judgeship, 177. 

Engineer, State Ifousc salary of — 267. 

Engle, Charles Francis, sketch and picture of — rooi. 

English, dominion of Mississippi — 2; governors of Mississippi, list of, 2; province 
of Mississippi, 165. 

Epidemic, at Natchez — 177. 

Escanachaha. regarding destruction of, by Gen. Claiborne — 176. 

Evans, Lewi-^ — 171. 

Executive departments — 949-967. 

Executive Journal nf Cun-. I. cake — 131. 

Executive, judicial and legislative departments — 951-1094. 

Executive residence (1842), picture of— 24; regarding erection of. 179. 

E?«pansion. regarding Cmv. Ouitm.-in favoring — 137. 

Expenditures, in Mississippi (1869-1876) — 185. 

Fac sirnile, signatures of governors of Mississippi Territory — 7; of first page 
of journal of Gov. Winthrop Sargent, 18; of first page of first law of Mis- 
sissippi Territory, IT49; of first page of first constitution, 1158; signatures 
of members of constitutional convention of 1817, 1162. 
• Factories, in Mississippi (1S82) — 187. 

Faculty of University of .Mi^<i<<ippi — 27<). _'8o. 

Falkner. Col. W. C. roganling \'irgini;i campaign— -183. 

Farish, Hazlewood Power, sketch and picture of— 1008. 

Far rah, Benj. — iji. 

Fartherrce. John D., sketch and picture of — 1091. 

Featherston, Gen. W. S.— Hx); regarding resolution of. regarding conduct of 
Gov. Ames — 186, 203. 



1274 INDEX 



Federal district attorneys, in Mississippi — 229-230. 

Federal judges, in Mississippi — 229. 

Federal marshals, in Mississippi — 231-232. . 

Federal officers, in Mississippi — 229-231. 

Felder, Luther Watson, sketch and picture of — 1075. 

Fenn, Claudius L., sketch and picture of — 1036. 

Ferdinand V., regarding Spanish dominion — i, 2. 

Fifth congressional district, counties in — 982. 

Fillmore, President, regarding appointments of Gov. Sharkey — 153. 

Financial conditions — 185, 186, 187, 188. 

First congressional district, counties in — 977. 

First constitution, fac simile of first page of — 1158. 

First law of Alississippi Territory, fac simile of first page of — 1148; history of, 

1150-1151; the law, 1152-1154. 
Fisher, Judge E. S., vs. Gov. Humphreys — 154. 
Fitzhugh, L. T., Jr., Secretary State capitol commission — 207. 
Fitzpatrick, Col., regarding Aaron Burr — 174. 
Flag, Mississippi State, picture of — opp. 382 ; opp. 988. 
Fletcher, Robert Virgil, picture of — 955 ; biographical sketch of, 957-959. 
Flower, State, see Magnolia. 
Fontaine, Charles D., vs. Gov. McRae — 149. 

Foote, Gov, Henry S., vs. Gov. Quitman — 137; regarding Gov. McNutt, 139; re- 
garding opinion of regarding Gov. Tucker, 140; regarding opinion of re- 
garding Gov. Guion, 144; biography of, 145-147; regarding authorities for 
biography of, 147; regarding Gov. McWillie, 150; regarding leadership of 
Union party, 181 ; regarding inauguration of, resignation of, and important 
events in administration of, 181 ; portrait of, insert between 144-145. 
Forrest County, regarding" creation of — 18(); officers of, 1107. 
Fort Confederation, regarding treaty — 173. 
Fort de Maurepas — 164. 

Fort Mims, regarding attack on by Creeks — 175. 
Fort Pannnire, regarding garrison of — 165, 166. 
Fort Pulaski— 1S4. 
Fort Rosalie, regarding a colony of France and city of Natchez, 164; regarding 

Mississippi colony — 164. 
Foster, Thomas Robbin, sketch and picture of — 1083. 
Fourth congressional district, counties in — 981. 

Fourth Constitution — 1172-1263; Distribution of Powers, 1172-1173; Boundaries 
of the State, 1173; Bill of Rights, 1174-1187; Legislative Department. iiSS 
1207; Executive, 1208- 1213; Judiciary, 1213-1225; Corporations, 1226-1236; 
Education, 1236-1239; Militia, 1239-1240; Penitentiary and Prisons, 1240- 
1241 ; Levees, 1241-1244; Franchise, 1244 1249; Apportionment, 1249-1252; 
General Provisions, 1252-1257; Amendments, 1257-1260; members of, 1260- 
1263. 
Foy, Malcomb Pleas, sketch and picture of — T069. 
Franchise, in Mississippi — 204, 205. 
Francis, rt-garding" leader of (.'reeks — 175. 
Franklin, Charles E., sketch and picture of — 1015. 
Frankiin County, officers of — 1107. 

Franklin, Malcolm Argyle. sketch anci picture of — 1012. 
Franklin, Mississippi, n-garding battle of — 184. 
Frazer, Dr. Robert. Mississippi 1. I. v!l: C. — 301. 
Frazier, Robert Masters, sketch and picture of — 1038. 
Freeman, J. D.--141, 150. 
Freeman's Chancery reports — 271. 



INDEX 1275 

V 

French colony in Mississippi — 164-165. 
French dominion, of Mississippi — i, 2. 
French governors of Mississippi, list of — i, 2. 
Frierson, John F., sketch and picture of — 1091. 

Fulton, Dr. Robert B., author article on University of Mississippi — 279; regard- 
ing University of Mississippi, 282. 
Furguson, David — 171. 
Furguson. William — 171. 
Gaillard, Isaac— 168, 169. 171 . 

Gaines, Lieut. Edmund P., regarding arrest of Aaron Burr. 
Galloway, Bishop Charles B., regarding address of at cornerstone of new capi- 

tol— 188. 
Galvez, Don Bernardo de. regarding West Florida — 2; regarding expulsion of 

English from West Florida — 165. 
Gardner, John H.,. sketch and picture of — 1076, 
Gayley, J. H.. regarding De^^^ r.nd Dumb Institute — 314. 
Gayoso, see Lemos. , 

Gazette. The Mississippi — 171. 

General Bookkeeper, salary of — 266: salary of clerk of. 266. 
George, Gen. J. Z., regarding chairman Democratic committee — 186; regarding 

death of. 188; regarding constitutional convention (iSooj, 204; regarding 

court reports of. 269; regarding digest of, 271; regarding honored by A. 

& M. College, 288. 
Georgia Colony, regarding including Mississippi — 165; regarding County of 

Bourbon, 166; regarding Yazoo fraud, 166; regarding cession of lands to 

U. S., 172. 
Gerald, Eugene, sketch and picture of — 1037. 
Gex, Emile Joseph, sketch and picture of — 1049. 
Gholson, Wm. Y., regarding University of Mississippi — i8o. 
Gibbs, Washington Dorsey, sketch and picture of — 1008. 
Gibson, Samuel — 171. 

Gillem, Gen. Alvin C, regarding command in Mississippi — 185, 201. 
Gin, cotton — 166. 
Girault, John R., regarding militia — 171 ; regarding election of first Mississippi 

auditor. 177. 
Going, John Byrd, sketch and picture of — 1040. 
Goodman, Burleigh, sketch and picture of — 1078. 
Gordon, Abram (Adam), vs. Abram M. Scott — 132. 
Gordon, Adam. vs. Hiram G. Runnels — 135. 
Govan, George M., clerk — 186. 

Governor, salary of — 266; salary of private secretary of. 266. 
Governors of Mississippi, list of — 25 and notes, 26 and notes, 125 and notes, 

126 and notes; biographies of, 127-163. 
Governors of Mississippi Territory, list of — 3 ; biographies of, 19-23. 
Grafters, in time of Gov. McXutt — 139. 
Graham, Sanford Martin, sketch and picture of — 1056. 
Graham, Chancellor T. B. — 161. 
Grand Gulf, regarding naval battle at — 183. 

Grand Pre — Don Carlos de. regarding governor of Natchez district — 166. 
Graves, Richard S., regarding embezzlement of — 140, 180. 
Grayson, Beverly R. — 132. 

Greaves, Stephen A. D.. sketch and picture of— 1050. 
Greeh, Abner. regarding appointment of as treasurer-General — 172, 175. 
Green, Bernard R.. advisor State capitol commission — 207. 
Green, Chas. B., regarding defeat of by Gov. Leake — 130. 
Green. Col. Thomas, regarding promise of aid to Col. Ellicott — 167; regarding 

militia, 171 ; regarding attorney generalship. 177. 



I 1276 * INDEX 

j Greene, Thos. M.— 172. 

Greene County, officers of — 1108. 
r Greene, Paris Alphonso, sketch and picture of — 1061. 
I Greenwood Cemetery — 142, 144. 
I Grenada County, officers of — 1 109. 
1 Greer, R. S. — 150. 

\ Grenada & Memphis R. R.—1S2; regarding appropriations for, 182; regarding 
suits against, 188. 

Grierson. regarding cavalry raid of — 183. 
I Griffith, Richard— 147- 

Griffith. Wm. B., regarding association of with Gov. Quitman — 136. 
[ Grimball, John A., vs. Gov. McNutt— 138. 
I Guion, Maj. Isaac — 143, 171. 

I Guion, Gov. John Isaac, biography of — 143-144; regarding authorities for biog 
j • raphy of, 144; regarding succession to Gov. Quitman, 181; portrait of, insert 

between 142-143. 

Gwin, WiUiam 2^1., vs. Gov. Quitman — 137; regarding Gov. McNutt, 139. 

Hall of Fame — 211. 
I Hall of History— 211. ! 

' Hampton, Jno. — 177. 

Hancock County, officers of — 1109. 

Hancock, R. C. regarding race for governor — 141, 142. 

Hannah, preacher, regarding Spanish imprisonment of — 167. 

Harding. Lyman, regarding Aaron Burr — 174; regarding Bank of Mississippi, 175. 

Hardy, J. C, author Historical Sketch of the Mississippi Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College — 286. 

Harmon, Rev., regarding Mississippi military service — 194. 

Harper, Francis Higdon, sketch and picture of — 1013. 

Harper, Jesse, regarding militia — 171. 

Harrell, Elisha Bryan, sketch and picture of — 1007. 

Harris &: Simrall, regarding court reports of — 269. 

Harris, J. B. — 161. 

Harris, John Lynn, sketch and picture of — ic88. 
. Harris, Wiley P., vs. Abram M. Scott — 132; vs. Hiram G. Runnels, . 135 ; dele- 
gate to Alontgomery convention, 183 ; regarding Mississippi secession con- 
vention, 197. 
" Harris, William L., regarding code of 1857 — 153. 

Harrison County, officers of — iiio. 

Harrison, James T.. delegate to ^Montgomery convention — 183. 

Harrison. Richard, regarding militia — 171. 

Hawks, Rev. Francis, regarding University of Mississippi — 180. 

Hawkins, George Robert, sketch and picture of — 1084. 

Haynes, treasurer, regarding suicide of — 195. 

Hay.:, Andrew, regarding race for governor — 141. 

Hebron, John Lawrence, Jr., sketch and picture of — 1004. 

Heidelberg, D. W., regarding digest of — 271. 

Henderson, Mr., regarding Gov. Runnels — 135. 

Henry, Thomas ^lonroe, regarding Jeff Davis Beauvoir ^Memorial Home — 309- 
311; picture of. 954; biographical sketch of, 96^-9(11. 

"Hcsl«ip, William David, sketch and picture of — 1077. 

Hightower, George R., sketch and picture of — 1017. 

Hill, George Henry, sketch and picture of — 1060. 

Hill, Jas., Secretary of State— 155. , 

Hill, Wilson Shedric, biography of— 981 ; picture of, 987. 

Hinds County, officers of — I no. 

Hinds, Gen. Thomas, regarding candidacy for governor — 129; regarding friend- 
ship for Gov. Charles Clark — 151. 



ii 



., r: r 



INDEX 1277 

History of Mississippi, An Outline — 164-189; regarding Early Explorations, 164; 
regarding Settlements — a Colony of PVance, 164-165; regarding an English 
Province, 165; regarding a Province of Spain, 165-170; regarding a Terri- 
tory of the U. S., 170-176; regarding a State of the Union, 176-182; regarding 
One of the Confederate States, 183-184; regarding Reconstruction, 184-189. 

History of Old State Capitol — 195. 

Hoggett, Jas. — 172. 

Hollv Springs, regarding capture of by Crnfederates — 183; regarding battle ot, 
i84. 

Holmes, Maj. Andrew Hunter — 127. 

Holmes County, officers of — iiii. 

Holmes, Gov. David, regarding sketch of — 23; biography of, 127-128; regard- 
ing authorities for sketch of, 128; regarding opinion of regarding Gov. 
Leake, 131; regarding appointment as governor, 175; regarding trouble with 
Indians, 175; important events of administration of, 176, 177; regarding 
constitutional convention of 1817, 176, 177; regarding proclamation of for 
convening first legislature, 177; regarding message of to legislature, 177; 
regarding inauguration of, resignation of and important events in admin- 
istration of, 178; portrait of, insert between 126-127. 

Holmes. George Frederick, regarding Universit}' of ^Mississippi — 279. 

Holmes, Herbert, sketch and picture of — 1046. ~ : 

Holmes, Hugh — 127. - . , 

Holmes, Col. Joseph — 127. 

Holy City Creeks — 176. ~ ''', 

Homochitto swamp — 127. 

Hood, Clarence Eugene, sketch and picture of — 1046. - ' 

Hopewell treat\ — 166. 

House of Representatives, speakers of, list of — 44-45 ; apportionment for, 988- 
989; 78th session, 1024- 1026; officers of, 1024; standing committees of, 1026- 
1029; joint committees, 1029; committee assignments, 1029-1034; sketches of 
members, 1035-1094. 

Hovey, Gen., regarding occupancy of Grenada — 183. 

Howard, John, regarding capture by French — 165. 

Howard & Hutchinson, regardmg statutes by — 273. 

Howard, Volney E., regarding duel with Gov. Reynolds — 135; regarding court 

reports of, 268. ; 

Howry, J. M., regarding University of Mississippi — 180. _; 

Hudson, William Moore, sketch and picture of — 10S9. 

Hull, Bascomb Gurley, sketch and picture of — IC63. 

Humphreys, regarding militia — 171. ; 

Humphreys, Gov. B. G., biography of — 153-154. 980-981; regarding authorities 
for biography of, 154; vs. Gov. Stone, 158; regarding inauguration of, re- 
moval of and important events in administration of. 184. 185, 200, 201, 202; 
portrait of, insert between 152-153, 978. 1 

Humphreys, G. W. — 153. i 

Hum.phreys, Ralph — 153. 

Hunt, Abija, rega riling Bank of -Mississippi — 175. 

Hunter. Col. David — 127. 

Hunter, Henry — 172. j 

Hunter, Narscworlhy. vs. Gov. Sargent— 19, 20; regarding address to Col. Elli- 

cott. 1O7; first territorial delegate. 172. ! 

Hurricane, reg.-jrding Mississippi history — 164. 

Hurricane Creek, regarding battle of — US4. 

Hutchenson. Anderson — 145. 

Hntchins. Col. Anthony, vs. Gov. Sargent — 19; regarding Gov. Gayoso, 167. 168, 
172; regarding committee of good order, 169. 



1278 INDEX 

Hutchins, Sam — 171. 

Hutchinson's code, regarding adoption of — 142. 

Immigration — 187. 

Impeachment, regarding Mississippi officials — 155, 186, 195, 203; regarding Gov. 
Ames, 202, 203. 

Imprisonment for debt, regarding abohshmcnt of — 178. 

Indians, in Mississippi — i. 

Industrial Institute and College, regarding establishment of — 187 ; historical 
sketch of, 298-302; picture of, 299; list of officers and instructors of, 303-305; 
organization of. 303 305. 

Insane, regarding establislmient of institution for — i8j; salary of superintendent 
of, 2^"] \ historical sketch of. 322-327; East Mississippi Hospital for, 2i2.'/-2,;}fi. 

Insurance commissioner, office salary of— 266, 960. 

Insurance, Mississippi department of — 188. 

Intemperance, regarding bill for evils of — 187. 

rri'tv.iicgnuni. in I\lississippi — 135, 144. 

Introductory Note — IX. 

Invasion of Mississippi — 184. 

Issaquena County, officers of — 11 12. 

Itawamba County, officers of — 11 12. 

luka, regarding battle of — 183. 

Jackson, regarding seleciion as capital — 130, 178, 193; regarding capture and 
burning of. 183, 184. 

Jackson & Brandon Railroad, regarding building of — 142, 181 ; regarding char- 
ter of, 179. 

Jackson, Gen. Andrew, regarding defeat of Robert J. Walker, I2i); regardinc: 
Mississippi troops at battle of New Orleans, 176; regarding visit of to Mis- 
sissippi, 179, 197. 

Jackson County, officers of — ii 13. 

Jacksonian democracy in Mississippi — 133, 134. 

Jackson, Capt. Michael, regarding conunand of — 165. 

Jasper County, officers of — 11 13. 

Jeff"erson, President, regarding Gov. Claiborne -20, 2F, 172; regarding Gov. Wil- 
liams, 22. 174; regarding Gov. Holmes, m"]; regarding Judge L.eake, 130; 
regarding public school system. 280. 

lefferson College, regarding establishment of — 173. 

Jeft'erson County, officers of — 11 14. 

Jefferson County, of INIississippi Territory, list of officers of — 15; list of supe- 
rior court, court of equity, justices of the peace and other civil officers, I5- 

JeflFerson Davis Beauvoir Memorial Home, picture of — 30S, 310; sketch of, 3^' 
311. 

Jefferson Davis County, regarding creation of — 1S9; officers of. 1114. 

Joe, the well digger — 142. 

Johnson. President, regarding Gov. Humphrcvs — 154; regarding proclamation 
of, 184. 

Johnson, Lonnie Chamblin, sketch and picture of — 1073. 

Jolinston. Gen. Albert Sidney, retrarding Gov. Chas. Clark — 151. 

Johnston, Amos R.. regarding Mississippi secession convention — 197. 

Johnston, Arista, sketch and picture of — 1043. 

john'^^.tone, Capt. George. rcga.rding English dominion— 2; governor of V---' 
Elorida. 165. 

Johnston, Oscar Goodbar, sketch and picture of — 1045. 

ijolict, Lewis, in Mississippi — 164. 
Jones, Andrew Jackson, sketch and picture of — 1083. 
Jones County, officers of — it 15. 
\ Jones, F. C, regarding Institution for Blind. Deaf and Dumb— 313- 



INDEX •1279 

Jones, Gaston Lilly, sketch and picture of — 1083. 

Jones, Moze Hunt, sketch and picture of — 1048. 

Jones, Sam — 964. 

Jones, Dr. R. W., regarding Industrial Institute and College — 300. 

Jones, Sidney Ross, sketch and picture of — 1087. 

Judges, circuit, list of — 34-39. 

Judges High Court of Errors and Appeals, Mississippi State, list of — 2^. 

Judges Supreme Court, Mississippi, list of — 27, 28. 

Judges, supreme and circuit, list of — 33-34. 

Judicial department — 967-974. 

Justice of Supreme Court, salary of — 266; salary of stenographer of, 266. 

Kalush Homa, regarding peace with French — 165. 

Kansas struggle, regarding effect of in Mississippi — 182. 

Kemper County, officers of — 11 16. 

Kerlerec, Louis BillonarL de, regarding French dominion — 2. 

Key, James Robert, sketch and picture of — 1005. 

Killingsvvorth, William A., sketch and picture of — 1035. 

Kimble, Frederick — 169, 170. 

Kincannon, Dr. Andrew Armstrong— IX, X, 301. 

King, Benjamin, vs. Gov. Lowry — 160. 

King, William Henry, sketch and picture of — 1066. 

Kirby, Ephraim— 173. 

Kossuth, regarding old Mississippi capitol — 195. 

Lacey, Henry B., author sketch on Mississippi penitentiary system — IX, X, 331. 

Lafayette County, regarding creation of— 180; officers of, 11 16. 

Lake, William A.— 141. 

Lamar County, officers of — 11 17. 

Lamar, L. Q. C, regarding joint canvass of with Gov. Alcorn — 156; regarding 
succession to Alcorn as U. S. senator, 157; regarding Mississippi secession 
convention, 198. 

Lamb, Joseph Edwin, sketch and picture of — 1055, 

Land commission of Mississippi Territory — 22. 

Land conmiissioners. State, list of— 32, ■},2,\ salary of, 266; salarv' of clerk of, 
266, 964. 

Land commissioners, territory, 32, 33, 173. 

Land offices, territory — 173. 

Langston, Troy Rufus, sketch and picture of — 1086. 

Lanier, \V. H., regariiing Alcorn A. (.\: M. College — 307. 

LaSalle,' in Mississippi — 164. \ 

Lauderdale County, officers of — TI18. 

Lausat, M., regarding transfer of Louisiana Purchase — 173. 

Law, regarding first in Mississippi Territory — 172. 

Lawrence County, officers of — rii8. 

Lawrence, John, regarding plan of for old Mississippi capitol — 196. 

Lawyers of Mississippi, regarding some prominent — 144. 

Lea, Luke, vs. Gov. (Juitman - -137. 

Lea. Pr^or, regarding rniversity of Mississippi — iSo. 

Leake County, officers of — 11 19. 

Leake, Capt. Mask — 130. 

Leake, Gov. Walter— ij8; biography of, 130 13;, ; regarding authorities for biog- 
raphy of, 131; reganling election first U. S. senator, 177; regarding inau- 
guration of, 178; regarding death of, 178; regarding important events in 
administration of, 178; regarding first State house, 193. 

Lee County, ofhcers of — 1120. 

Lee, Francis Monroe, picture of — 962; biography of, 963. 



1280 INDEX 

Lee, Gen. Stephen D., regarding resignation of presidency of A. & M. College — 

159; president A. & AI. College, 288. 
Lee, Zachariah Zion — 963. 
Leflore County, officers of — 1120. 
Leftwich, George Jabez, sketch and picture of — 1023. 

■ Legislation, Mississippi, summary of — 336-382. 
I Legislative department — 988-1094; regarding apportionment, 988; regarding the 

senate, 989-991; senators, 78th session, 992; senate standing committees,. 
f 993-996; sketches of senators, 997-1023; regarding representatives, 78th ses- 
I sion, 1024-1026; standing house committees, 1026-1034; sketches of represen- 

i tatives, 1035-1094. 

I Legislature, Mississippi, list of members of — 46-124; regarding Gov. Holmes, 
\ 127, 177; regarding time for meeting of, 135; regarding organization 

of first, 177; regarding special call of by Gov. Pettus, 182; regarding 
[^ - establishment of public school system by, 185; of 1876, 186; regarding in- 
f quiry into conduct of Gov. Ames, 186; acts of (1882), 187; regarding meet- 
\ iiig of first, 191 ; regarding impeachment of Mississippi officials by, 155, 186, J 

[ 195, 202. 203; at Macon, regarding two exciting events in. 194; regarding 
. appropriation and cost of old capitol, 196; regarding appropriation and cost 

of new capitol, 207 ; salary of m.embers of, 267. 
Legislature of Mississippi Territory, regarding origin of — 20. 172; regarding 

censure by of Senator Foote, 146; regarding first meeting of, 172; list of 
j representatives of, 172. 
iLemos, Don Manuel Gayoso de. regarding Spanish dominion — 2; regarding 

fixing southern boundir\- of L^. S., 166, 167; regarding proclamation of, 167; 

regarding proposition to of committee of safety. 168; regarding reply of to 

committee of safety, 160; regarding succession of to Gov. Carondelet, 170; 

regarding Spanish evacu^ition, 170. 
! Levee district, from Vicksburg to Teimessee line — 182. 
'Levee system, regarding establishment of — 156, 182, 

■ Lewis, James Asbury, sketch and picture of — 1042. 
Lewis, Milton Alexander, sketch and picture of — 1054. 

Librarian. State, office of — 266; salary of. 266; salary of assistant of, 266. 962. 
Librarians, of State, list of — 33. 
Library of Congress, regarding assistance to Director of Archives and History' — ■ 

IX. X. 
Lieutenant-governors, list of — 28. 45, 46; salary of, 266, 
Lincoln, effect in Mississippi of election of — 147. 
Lincoln County, officers of — 1121. 
Lindsey, Carhon A., sketch and picture of — 1042. 
Link, Karl E., superintendent new Mississippi capitol — 213. 
Link, Theodore C, architect new Mississippi capitol, 207, 213. 
Lintot, Bernard — 168. 
Lipscomb, Dabney — 143; author historical sketch of Mississippi Industrial Insti 

tute, 298. — 

"Little Capitol around the Corner, The" — 193. 
Local option, in Mississippi — 187. 
Lofton, W. Milford, sketch and picture of — 1079. 

Logan, James Stevens, sketch and picture of — 1002. • 

London. John— 160, 076. 

Longest, John Tsbell, sketch and picture of — 1075. 

Longino, Gov. A, II., biography of — 161-162; regarding authorities for biography 
• of, 162; regarding inauguration of. important events in administration of, 

tS8; State capitol commissioner, 207. 
Lopez, regarding sympathy for by Gov. Quitman — 137, iSi. 
Longstreet, Dr. A. B., regarding I'niversity of Mississippi — 280. 



1 



INDEX 1281 

Louisiana — i ; regarding French colonists, 164. 

Louisiana PurcliabC, regardinir administration of Gov. Claiborne — 21. 

Love, Sidney Ovid, sketch and picture of — 1081. 

Lowndes County — 139; officers of, 11 21. 

Lowry, Gov. Robert, vs. Gov. Stone— 158, 159; biography of, 159-160; regarding 

authorities for biography of, 160; regardmg inauguration of, important events • 

in administration of, iSj ; regarding Jefferson Davis, 203, 3C0. 

Lowry, Robert, Sr. — 159. 

Lynch, Gov. Charles, biography of — 133-134; vs. Abram M. Scott, 132; regard- 
ing authorities for biography of, 134; vs. Hiram G. Runnels, 135; re- 1 
garding succession to Gov. Scott, 179; regarding inauguration, 179; regard- 
ing important events in administration of, 180. 

Madison County, officers of — 1122. 

Magna Charta, regarding public education — 279. 

Magnolia, State llower of Mississippi — 11; picture of, insert preceding 949. j 

Mahon, Hugh Kirby, sketch and picture of — 1020. 

Making of Mississippi, The — 1-2. . . i 

Mallory, John H., secretary constitutional convention, 1832 — 179. ] 

Manship, Luther, picture of — 950; biographical sketch of, 952. 

Map.^ Mississippi River — 1772, insert between 2-3; Louisiana Louisiane and 
Places of Mississippi Road, 1722, insert between 62-63; Carte Territoire 
D'Orleans, Floride Occidentale, Territoire du iMississippi, 1S06, insert be- 
tween 124-125; State of Louisiana with part of Mississippi Territory. 1816, 
insert between 228-22^); Congressional Districts of Mississippi, 238; Missis- 
sippi State, 1819, insert between 3S6-387; Mississippi State, 1822. insert be- 
tween 480-481 ; Mississippi in 1827, insert between 590-591 ; States of Mis- 
sissippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas Territory, 1832, insert between 736- 
7^7; An Accurate Map or Delineation of the State of Mississippi and 
Part of Louisiana and Al.ibama, 1839. insert between 812-813; Hardie's 
Geographical, Historical and Statistical Official Map of iMississippi, Em- 
bracing Parts of Alabama. Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, 1872, insert , 
between 884-885; Map of Mississippi. 1908. showing new counties, JetTer- 
.son Davis and Forrest, insert between T096-1097. 

Marion County, officers of — 1123. 

Marquette, Pere Jacques, in Mississippi — 164. ' | 

Marshall C<iunty, rcg.irdiu'j: Gov. Matthew\s — 142; officers of, I123. I 

Marschalk, Andrew, first Mississippi printer — 170, 177. j 

Martin. A. K., regarding Institute for Deaf and Dumb — 314. ! 

Martin, John Bennett, sketch and picture of — 1064. ! 

Matthews. George — 130. ' 

Matthews, Gov. Joseph \V., biography of — 142-143; regarding authorities for 
biography of. 143; regarding inauguration of, important events in adminis- 
tration of, 181; portrait of, between 140-141. 

Afaumee. battle of. regarding Maj. Isaac Guion — 143. 

Maury, J. 1 1. — 15.-;. ' 

Mayers, Judge. \. G.. regarding partnership with Gov. Lowry — 159. j 

Mayes, Judge Robert Burns — 9<xS; biography of. 971. J 

Mead. Cowlos. regarding Gov. Williams- -22. 23; regarding Aaron Burr. 12S, 
174; regarding appointment secretary, 174; regarding message of to legis- 
lature regarding .Aaron Burr, 174; regarding actions of against separation 
of Missi>Mppi from V. S.. 174; regarding Bank of Mississippi, 175. 

Members of lb.:iM> ..f Rfprt^omaiivt-; of Mississippi Trrriti^ry, list of^-ic. 

McmlriTs of Lruislativc C.)nncil of Mi